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To: Publius
I tend to read the Federalists from my leather-bound volume of the essays, and found that this one had many penciled-in notes and brackets from my previous readings.

Some points of Hamilton's were very strong, 59-62 especially so.

Hamilton's comments on the will of the people teams with that day's belief that the government will be limited and charged the judiciary above all others with enforcing the limitations. It is that belief that fostered the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence. I do not believe that Hamilton would attempt to justify a takeover by a large faction which wanted to thwart liberty or independence.

But it is easy to see that it would require an uncommon portion of fortitude in the judges to do their duty as faithful guardians of the Constitution where legislative invasions of it had been instigated by the major voice of the community.

Fortitude? Let's see if the justices attend the State of the Union speech.

I temper my views on Hamilton with this essay. Although he wanted a powerful federal government, he wanted its scope to be limited. His fault was that he did not place enough trust in the craft of man, who eventually set up a series of events which led to the corruption of the judiciary.

7 posted on 01/24/2011 4:03:00 PM PST by Loud Mime (If you don't believe in God, you will believe in government. Choose your "G")
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To: Loud Mime

“I do not believe that Hamilton would attempt to justify a takeover by a large faction which wanted to thwart liberty or independence. “

Newburgh Conspiracy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newburgh_Conspiracy

Washington, in response to a letter from Alexander Hamilton said that while he sympathized both with the plight of his officers and men and with those in Congress, he would not use the army to threaten the civil government, a course which Washington believed would violate the principles of republicanism for which they had all been fighting. A small group of officers, led probably by Major John Armstrong, Jr., aide to Major General Horatio Gates, attempted to forestall Washington’s intervention, viewing him as too moderate; they would have forcibly installed Gates in his place as Commander-in-Chief. They published placards, the “Newburgh Addresses,” calling for a meeting on March 12. They warned that come peace Congress would ignore them as they “grow old in poverty, wretchedness and contempt.”[4]

Hamilton of course, played the snake in the grass,
http://books.google.com/books?id=4iafgTEhU3QC&pg=PA177&lpg=PA177&dq=Hamilton+was+coaxing+washington&source=bl&ots=v5wryL8ivp&sig=GxNnopKKxhQ73PWreDhfrYkhbVg&hl=en&ei=DTs-Tf2HC8atgQfoxbinCA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&sqi=2&ved=0CBMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Hamilton%20was%20coaxing%20washington&f=false


9 posted on 01/24/2011 6:57:39 PM PST by MontaniSemperLiberi (Moutaineers are Always Free)
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