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Amazon.com shutting Irving office over tax dispute
Dallas News ^ | February 10, 2011 | ERIC TORBENSON and MARIA HALKIAS

Posted on 02/11/2011 6:18:58 PM PST by NCjim

As a result of an ongoing tax dispute with Texas, Amazon.com has decided to take its ball and go home.

The online retailer said Thursday that it would shutter its Irving distribution facility April 12 and cancel plans to hire as many as 1,000 additional workers rather than pay Texas what the state says is owed in uncollected sales tax.

Texas wants $269 million from Seattle-based Amazon in past-due sales tax. It sent the bill to the company last October.

“Despite much hard work and the support of other Texas officials, we’ve been unable to come to a resolution with the Texas comptroller’s office,” Dave Clark, vice president of operations for the facility, said in a letter sent to its employees here announcing the closure.

“Closing this fulfillment [distribution] center is clearly not our preferred outcome,” he said.

“We were previously planning to build additional facilities and expand in Texas, bringing more than 1,000 new jobs and tens of millions of investment dollars to the state, and we regret the need to reverse course.”

State officials weren’t backing down Thursday.

“We regret losing any business in the state of Texas,” said Allen Spelce, spokesman for the comptroller’s office. “But our position hasn’t changed: If you have a physical business presence in the state of Texas, you owe sales tax.”

Amazon continues to appeal the tax bill through an administrative process, Spelce said, “and it’s going to be a while” before a decision and potential appeals are completed.

(Excerpt) Read more at dallasnews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events; US: Texas; US: Washington
KEYWORDS: amazon; dufusperry; salestax; taxes
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1 posted on 02/11/2011 6:19:00 PM PST by NCjim
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To: NCjim

Just out of curiosity even *if* they pack up and go home they still owe the Tax money right?


2 posted on 02/11/2011 6:21:02 PM PST by N3WBI3 (Ah, arrogance and stupidity all in the same package. How efficient of you. -- Londo Mollari)
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To: NCjim
NC did the same thing and lost bigtime.Texas deserves ZERO!
3 posted on 02/11/2011 6:25:06 PM PST by taxtruth (Don't end the fed,jail the fed!)
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To: NCjim

Too many corporations are pitting one state and municipality (meaning you and I) against each other for cutting special deals ...free land, tax breaks, kickbacks etc.

The NFL teams pulled that scam so that taxpayers were forced to fund billion dollar stadiums. Business should expand or build based only upon a business plan that has no taxpayer involvement. If they can’t make a profit, then don’t build, but leave taxpayers out of it.

I support a national law that levels the playing field so that business can’t pit Pittsburgh taxpayers against Cleveland. They need to make a go of it on their own without taxpayer help...period. When did this all start where business looks to taxpayers for providing capital?


4 posted on 02/11/2011 6:25:42 PM PST by apoliticalone (America for Americans, not government for corporatists)
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To: NCjim
“We regret losing any business in the state of Texas,” said Allen Spelce, spokesman for the comptroller’s office. “But our position hasn’t changed: If you have a physical business presence in the state of Texas, you owe sales tax.”

Right. Because it's much more important for the government to get paid than it is for hundreds of Texas Amazon employees to get paid.
5 posted on 02/11/2011 6:27:08 PM PST by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: NCjim
Perry criticizes Combs' handling of Amazon

Perry said he would work with the Republican-controlled Legislature to try to make sure Amazon can stay. And he was bluntly criticial of his fellow Republican Combs:

"That is a problem and I would suggest to you that we need to look at that decision that our comptroller made," he told the Examiner. "The comptroller made that decision independently. I would tell you from my perspective that's not the decision I would have made."

6 posted on 02/11/2011 6:28:21 PM PST by MamaDearest
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To: NCjim
Perry criticizes Combs' handling of Amazon

Perry said he would work with the Republican-controlled Legislature to try to make sure Amazon can stay. And he was bluntly criticial of his fellow Republican Combs:

"That is a problem and I would suggest to you that we need to look at that decision that our comptroller made," he told the Examiner. "The comptroller made that decision independently. I would tell you from my perspective that's not the decision I would have made."

7 posted on 02/11/2011 6:29:30 PM PST by MamaDearest
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To: taxtruth
NC did the same thing and lost bigtime.Texas deserves ZERO!

cudos to Amazon. The parasitic bureaucrats at all levels of government NEVER stop in their pursuit of the wealth of the Producers. Governments everywhere are the enemy of Freedom. I am glad Amazon is standing strong against this and online taxes. The vast majority of government workers at ALL levels perform no real (productive) work.

8 posted on 02/11/2011 6:29:48 PM PST by sand88
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To: AnotherUnixGeek

They are going to have trouble finding a state that does not have the physical presence = taxable sales rule.


9 posted on 02/11/2011 6:30:16 PM PST by Ingtar (Together we go broke (from a Pookie18 post))
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To: AnotherUnixGeek

Maybe for in-state sales, but certainly not out-of-state...


10 posted on 02/11/2011 6:33:41 PM PST by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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To: sand88

This reminds me of people living in Ma.driving to NH to purchase cigarettes and alcohol and the Ma.police were searching cars at the stateline and demanding tax payments.Insane!


11 posted on 02/11/2011 6:36:59 PM PST by taxtruth (Don't end the fed,jail the fed!)
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To: NCjim

All taxation should be on the individual. Taxing corporations is simply hiding the tax in the price of goods. People should feel the impact of all the “services” they want the government to provide.


12 posted on 02/11/2011 6:40:21 PM PST by hopespringseternal
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To: Axenolith

Maybe for in-state sales, but certainly not out-of-state...


I didn’t read this entire article. But I believe I read in another that Texas wants to collect Texas Sales Tax on out of state purchases. Amazon already collects sales tax on in-state purchases.

Kentucky has an Amazon Distribution center here too and they collect sales tax on in-state purchases here. As much as I like Texas I think that they are wrong to try and collect Texas Sales tax on out-of-state purchases. If anyone has the right to collect Sales tax it’s the states where the purchaser lives and had the items delivered to.


13 posted on 02/11/2011 6:45:23 PM PST by The Working Man
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To: apoliticalone
Too many corporations are pitting one state and municipality (meaning you and I) against each other for cutting special deals

Meadow muffins!

The problem is government. The solution isn't more government.

Adding laws is STUPID.

/johnny

14 posted on 02/11/2011 6:46:33 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: apoliticalone
When did this all start where business looks to taxpayers for providing capital?

My guess is about the same time the taxman looked to business to take their capital to pay for social programs and whatnot.

I don't disagree with you in theory, it's just the reality. Business pay a myriad of taxes - including half of SS among others, not to mention fees and permits up the whazoo. Businesses have been used to serve as a slave tax collector - just pass it on to the customer so they don't blame us. Case in point - who makes more money off a gallon of gas - it's not big bad oil.

My opinion is that the cause of this is the lack of personal responsibility of the general public. There will be a 911 operator taking a call if MCD's runs out of chicken nuggets and hell to pay if little Johnny's parents have to fork up more than $50 for a year of public school and coincident babysitting services.

I'd like pay as you go for the services you use. If certain services aren't used - get rid of them.

Take care.

15 posted on 02/11/2011 6:47:08 PM PST by !1776!
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To: NCjim

I think it’s going to be hard for Amazon to convince a court that they have no direct relationship with a distribution center, when they seem to have direct control in being able to close it and move it, or to hire or fire workers.

And the law is clear, if you have any business relationship in a state, you are required to collect from the residents of the state the sales tax those residents are required to pay.

Amazon was trying to help Texas residents cheat on their sales taxes, and Texas is calling them on it. And Amazon is proving them right, by exercising direct control over their so-called “independent” distributer.


16 posted on 02/11/2011 6:50:19 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: apoliticalone

In this case it isn’t a tax Amazon has to pay, it’s a tax Amazon was supposed to collect, just like the mom-and-pop book store down the street had to collect the sales tax. Amazon realised they could make more money if they helped people cheat on their taxes, just like some businesses find they can make more profit if they hire illegal immigrants and pay them under the table so they don’t have to pay taxes on them.


17 posted on 02/11/2011 6:52:08 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: AnotherUnixGeek

Amazon insists they don’t have any Texas employees, and that’s why they don’t have to collect Texas sales tax.


18 posted on 02/11/2011 6:53:15 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: sand88

If your state has a sales tax, and nobody in your state pays it, are you ready to have your roads piled up with snow, full of potholes, with bridges collapsing and lights failing?

How do you expect your state to collect taxes, if some companies can get away with helping people cheat?


19 posted on 02/11/2011 6:55:01 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: apoliticalone

How is not being extracted by force, a tax, or fine, or fee....’looking for capital’?

Why should there be a single tax? Values are different, citizens ought to be able to shape the kind of economy they want. Some want Detroit, and have it. Others want Houston, and have it.


20 posted on 02/11/2011 6:55:01 PM PST by Leisler (Our debts are someone's profit. Follow the money, the vig.....)
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To: taxtruth

And will get zero.


21 posted on 02/11/2011 6:55:44 PM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.8)
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To: The Working Man

Without digging out my accountants eyeshade.. cursory glance seems that TX is wanting sales tax for ALL Amazon’s Sales, not just TEXAS Sales.

If that’s the case... I’d be cheering Amazon OUT..


22 posted on 02/11/2011 6:55:56 PM PST by gwilhelm56 (Egypt 2011 = Iran 1979)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Yes. Roads should be private.


23 posted on 02/11/2011 6:59:05 PM PST by Leisler (Our debts are someone's profit. Follow the money, the vig.....)
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To: hopespringseternal

Dead assed backwards.
The state should have zero authority to make individual citizens keep financial records of their economic activity and pay for each transaction.

You deserve an IRS audit for your post, because that is the inanity you just proposed as the norm.


24 posted on 02/11/2011 7:01:10 PM PST by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.8)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Yep.


25 posted on 02/11/2011 7:09:15 PM PST by Jedidah
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To: CharlesWayneCT
If your state has a sales tax, and nobody in your state pays it, are you ready to have your roads piled up with snow, full of potholes, with bridges collapsing and lights failing?

Gas tax, property tax, vehicle registration tax, etc.

What does/should a sales tax have to do with road maintenance?

26 posted on 02/11/2011 7:13:33 PM PST by !1776!
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To: Leisler

Roads are in the constitution.


27 posted on 02/11/2011 7:13:52 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: MrEdd

Am I on FRee Republic ?? or am I in the KOS ZONE?? Hearing a lot of “TAX that CORPORATION” crap.

after a little further investigation, it appears that TX is trying to tax Amazon for ALL its sales.. not just TEXAS Sales (which they already ADMITTED they paid).

Amazing how long some of these Liberal TROLLS can live here.


28 posted on 02/11/2011 7:14:20 PM PST by gwilhelm56 (Egypt 2011 = Iran 1979)
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To: Ingtar

Here in NH we have no sales tax (and no income tax). Amazon could build here to distribute to the New England states.

A great place for them would be the Pease Trade Port next to the old SAC Airforce base now being used for cargo flights.


29 posted on 02/11/2011 7:22:33 PM PST by CapnJack
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To: apoliticalone

The greedy government, local, state and federal think everyone owes them (as of now 50% of everything they make) and bleed companies dry also...When a company can go oversea’s for their steel, pay for it, pay for the shipping of it back into the country, pay tariffs on it and its still cheaper than buying steel in the US, its unions and government regulations that deserve the scorn.


30 posted on 02/11/2011 7:30:32 PM PST by goat granny
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To: The Working Man

Texas does collect sales tax on internet purchases from out of state. Whenever I type in my ship to address, it automatically add Texas sales tax. I buy from many large online sites, and all do it.


31 posted on 02/11/2011 7:39:18 PM PST by rightly_dividing (1 Cor. 15:1-4)
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To: Ingtar
They are going to have trouble finding a state that does not have the physical presence = taxable sales rule.

True, but locating in a state where they make fewer sales will lower the state sales tax hit. If, for example, they relocate to North Dakota, they'll have very few sales in that state compared to the sales they make in Texas.

32 posted on 02/11/2011 7:40:28 PM PST by Richard Kimball
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To: gwilhelm56
I saw nothing in the article to suggest what you said.

According to the article:

“Amazon.com was asked to play by the same rules and has responded by eliminating hundreds of Texas jobs,” said Danny Diaz, a spokesman for the Alliance for Main Street Fairness in Washington, D.C. “Amazon could have chosen to collect the sales tax as Texas retailers do, but instead they opted to protect their special sales tax loophole to the detriment of hardworking families.”
The dispute is over whether the distributer gives Amazon a physical presense, which would then require they they collect sales tax for purchases made by residents.

Amazon insists that the distributer is independent:

Amazon, with $25 billion in sales last year, has operated the Irving center since 2006. It argues that a subsidiary company owned the center. The state audited Amazon after reporting by The Dallas Morning News questioned whether the retailer was complying with state law.
But now they claim they will close the distributer. Which means that they have direct control over it, which means it is hard to argue that it is independent.

Texas is asking for $269 million in unpaid sales tax, for sales over multiple years. Amazon had $25 billion in sales; if Texas was going after all of that, the amount due would be $1.25 billion a year. So clearly they aren't trying to tax ALL sales.

According to another article: "The state says that Amazon is responsible for the tax it has not collected on online sales made in Texas. The $269 million includes the taxes, plus penalties and interest, from 2005 to 2009."

Note that this is $269 million that people in texas owed on items they purchased; that $269 million is made up by the other texas residents who don't cheat on their taxes.

Note also that that $269 million, when not collected by Amazon, is then the responsibility of the individual residents. Unfortunately, since Texas has local sales taxes, it's a bit complicated for the residents when Amazon doesn't do the job of collecting the sales tax.

Texas residents should follow this process: Sales and Use Tax

Also FAQ for Texas Use Tax:

You used property purchased from an out-of-state retailer. In general, if you purchase a taxable item from an out-of-state retailer without paying Texas tax and use the property in Texas the purchase is subject to use tax and must be reported. If you paid Texas use tax to such a retailer, you are not required to report the tax. That retailer must provide you with a receipt showing, among other things, the amount of use tax collected. You should retain a copy of the receipt showing you paid Texas tax.

...

Do I owe tax on goods purchased via mail-order catalogs or Internet merchandise?
Yes. A seller who uses catalogs or the Internet to sell goods is treated the same as any other seller of taxable items. If you purchase merchandise through a catalog or the Internet from a seller located in Texas, you owe Texas sales tax on the purchase. If you purchase merchandise through a catalog or the Internet from a seller located outside of Texas and use the taxable item in Texas, then you owe Texas use tax on the purchase. An out-of-state mail-order company or an Internet company may hold a Texas Sales and Use tax permit and collect Texas tax. If the out-of-state seller does not have a Texas permit or does not collect Texas use tax, the use tax is due and payable by the purchaser.
...
If you do not hold a Texas sales and use tax permit and you bought items on which the seller did not collect Texas sales or use tax, you must report your purchases on form 01-156, Texas Occasional Use Tax.

Use Tax Form:
When to File: This return, with payment, should be filed on or before the 20th day following the period (month or year) during which items subject to use tax are brought into the Texas.
Imagine having to fill out this form once a month, every time you make a purchase from Amazon. But that is what Amazon is forcing it's Texas customers to do, by not collecting the tax for them.

The only people who benefit from this, are TAX CHEATs. I guess I could do that hysterical rant "Am I fn Free Republic? Or am I in the Democrat Zone, where we cheer people who cheat on their taxes????" But I won't, because there is a weird disconnect when it comes to discussing this issue -- conservatives who would NEVER think to cheat on other taxes, defend their right to cheat their own state out of legally required tax payments.

WHich also cheats their fellow state residents, since they have to pay more taxes to make up for the tax cheaters.

33 posted on 02/11/2011 7:50:58 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: NCjim

Three cheers for amazon standing up to the tax bullies. Moving to a friendlier state is what Going Galt is all about! Wish more companies had the balls amazon does!


34 posted on 02/11/2011 7:52:05 PM PST by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from the right stuff!)
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To: rightly_dividing

Only if the online merchant has a bricks-and-mortar presence in that state.


35 posted on 02/11/2011 7:59:28 PM PST by Jedidah
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To: catnipman

Get real. It’s not “tax bullying” for a state to collect sales taxes from Amazon, just as it does from all other merchants doing business in the state. The Amazon warehouse is a legitimate bricks-and-mortar physical presence in Texas.

Amazon’s crap about a negative business climate in Texas is just that.

Us Texans like bidness. We also like fair and honest play, and Amazon is nothing but a tax cheat in this instance.


36 posted on 02/11/2011 8:02:05 PM PST by Jedidah
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Comment #37 Removed by Moderator

To: gwilhelm56

So, did you have a source for your claim that Texas was trying to tax Amazon for all their sales? Because I can’t find it, and you certainly didn’t provide it in all your ranting.

And I’m sorry that you didn’t understand, but most of my comment to you wasn’t really about you, and it also wasn’t a quote of the article. It was quotes from OTHER articles, along with extensive quotes from the Texas tax information web site.

If you read the whole article, you should have known that most of what I wrote didn’t come from the article. And even if you didn’t, the fact that I TOLD you in the comments exactly what I was quoting, AND gave you links, should have been a clue.

But thanks for the good laugh, it’s been a long time since my kids were young enough to use the “wild crazy-man rant” style of argument.


38 posted on 02/11/2011 8:34:02 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Doesn’t matter ... You’ve already marked them GUILTY... so HANG THE WHOLE BUNCH to save the cost of a trial to your precious taxpayers.

Troll


39 posted on 02/11/2011 8:42:33 PM PST by gwilhelm56 (Egypt 2011 = Iran 1979)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Doesn’t matter ... You’ve already marked them GUILTY... so HANG THE WHOLE BUNCH to save the cost of a trial to your precious taxpayers.

Troll


40 posted on 02/11/2011 8:42:40 PM PST by gwilhelm56 (Egypt 2011 = Iran 1979)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

As a small Texas business who reports to the State Comptroller, I will be most surprised to learn, with certainty, of any Texas “use tax”. The Comptroller collects “sales and services” tax in Texas.

Maybe Virginia has such a use tax.


41 posted on 02/11/2011 8:49:35 PM PST by dusttoyou ("Progressives" are wee-weeing all over themselves, Foc nobama)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

Amazon does charge sales tax on sales made to Texas residents. Texas is trying to say that Amazon owes taxes on all sales serviced through that logistics center, including out of state sales. My cousin, who works for one of the law firms involved in this fight, told me about this.


42 posted on 02/11/2011 9:22:53 PM PST by SirFishalot
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To: MrEdd
I didn't say anything about keeping records. Why would you need to keep records? If everyone has equal standing before the law, no records are necessary. The tax bill is the same for everyone.

People pay taxes. Every tax ultimately comes out of the pocket of citizens. Corporations don't pay taxes, they collect them. They pass the cost on to consumers.

There was a time when taxes were levied this way. A tax had a specific purpose, and when that purpose was met the tax went away because those paying it could directly feel its cost. It forced hard decisions about what was really necessary.

Now we blindly transfer trillions from productivity to sloth simply because we hide the cost from ourselves.

Getting nasty because you don't understand what someone posted is pretty immature.

43 posted on 02/11/2011 9:33:28 PM PST by hopespringseternal
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To: taxtruth

That isn’t necessarily so... if that tax figure is based on sales WITHIN Texas - then the state is 100% entitled to collect.

If that is an attempt by Texas to grab sales tax revenue to out-of-state sales, then they are out of luck.


44 posted on 02/11/2011 9:42:43 PM PST by TheBattman (They exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature...)
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To: rightly_dividing
Texas does collect sales tax on internet purchases from out of state. Whenever I type in my ship to address, it automatically add Texas sales tax. I buy from many large online sites, and all do it.

That must mean that the companies you order from have some sort of physical presence in your state. All it takes is a little one-man office to suddenly make those taxes from what is technically outside the state, to become legally taxable as in-state.

The first time I encountered this (and by no means the last time) was several years ago when I bought a PowerMacintosh directly from Apple. They charged me sales tax (though the shipping was free). When I buy a 99cent song on iTunes - it actually costs me just over $1 due to sales tax.

Guess what - there is no Apple store in the entire state. But there is some form of physical company presence in Arkansas, thus they are required to collect sales taxes from buyers here. On the other hand, Amazon does not (they have no physical presence here in Arkansas).

Order a cell phone from Verizon or AT&T's online stores - even though it is shipped from another state (at least for me - maybe not for you) - I still get charged sales tax - because both have physical offices and even company-owned retail locations in the state.

45 posted on 02/11/2011 10:00:08 PM PST by TheBattman (They exchanged the truth about God for a lie and worshiped and served the creature...)
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To: rightly_dividing
What you may not comprehend, is that although those companies “charge you a tax”, that does not mean the company is passing it to any government entity, or even that what you paid as a tax, was actually even subject to taxation.

My company is based in Florida.
We have an “office” in one other state.
If you buy a product through my company, and either your billing or shipping address is located in Florida, or that one other state we have an office in, my company is required to collect sales tax, and pay it directly to the appropriate taxation authority.
If you are from any of the other 48 states, and buy a product from my company, we do not charge a sales tax for your purchase.
As to whether or not YOU “owe” a tax of any sort to your own state or local government for whatever you bought from my company, I have no idea, nor is my company required to do anything about collecting it, except to maintain records for all our sales to everyone for a period of seven years.

Many “Internet” companies automatically add your local sales tax to your purchase price, but do not remit that amount to your State.
So if you buy something online that is 6-10% cheaper than what you would pay at your local store, and yet you are still stupid enough to pay “tax” on it....you just enabled an out of state tax cheater to keep on cheating.
Florida has no income tax.
We have a state sales tax of 6%, and local option taxes of up to an additional 2%
I consider that a reasonable amount of State government taxation, for government services rendered.

46 posted on 02/11/2011 10:21:59 PM PST by sarasmom
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To: Axenolith

It punishes other TX businesses who are paying sales taxes to give Amazon a tax break...but it makes sense not to charge out of state sales.


47 posted on 02/11/2011 10:37:35 PM PST by lonestar
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To: sarasmom
I understand exactly what you are saying. Before I moved to Texas six months ago, in many years of online purchasing, I was never charged a sales tax by anyone online and out of state, large companies or mom and pop, now living in Texas, the same companies charge state sales tax, but not local sale tax. I don't know if they pay Texas, but I bet they do. I seriously doubt that HP or other multi-billion dollar companies would charge a tax then not pay it. When I bought my new computer(from HP) and typed in my old address in another state, there was no sales tax included, but when I used my new Texas address, state sales tax was included in the cost. Same thing for other online purchases.

My wifes company just moved to Texas 6 months ago from a deep south state. There was no taxes due there because only the end user pays tax in that state, no a reseller, and they are an importer and wholesale outfit. On they other hand, in Texas, they have to pay state sales tax on all of their merchandise, even though most of the sales are going out of state and even out of the country to Canada, Mexico, and South America.

Since I am not a tax attorney, nor CPA, I do not know just how all this effects Amazon, the subject of the article. I'm just relaying my personal experiances with Texas's sales taxes and making comparison to my home state's tax code, which sounds like that of Florida.

48 posted on 02/12/2011 12:51:22 AM PST by rightly_dividing (1 Cor. 15:1-4)
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To: CharlesWayneCT

I still don’t want time wasting civil engineers, hack contractors, union labor, social planners doing high cost, low quality often unwanted roads. I’d rather go with out. That would 1., naturally form cities, 2. reserve open space outside the cities. 3. reduce the size and political attraction of government.


49 posted on 02/12/2011 3:05:35 AM PST by Leisler (Our debts are someone's profit. Follow the money, the vig.....)
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To: CharlesWayneCT
If your state has a sales tax, and nobody in your state pays it, are you ready to have your roads piled up with snow, full of potholes, with bridges collapsing and lights failing?

Bridges are collapsing now. Roads are being neglected now. The reason is NOT because governments aren't collecting enough money. Government parasites at all levels are purposely neglecting the infrastructure needs in order to hire more people in do nothing jobs and to pay out obscene pensions. Governments have long ago stopped "serving the public needs" to become wealth consuming beasts hell bent on extracting as much hard earned money from productive citizens as possible. Every major problem in this Republic can be traced back to government.

How do you expect your state to collect taxes, if some companies can get away with helping people cheat?

If any company or person can legally withhold money from any government entity, then they are truly doing a "public service." Money left in the hands of the people is much better managed and valued than if it is handed over to the parasite class.

Our Republic is approaching very perilous times -- whether it's in one year, two or twenty. Our currency is being destroyed by the government class, our education has long ago been destroyed by the leftist political class (purposely.) Who knows if the parasite class will succeed in the Cap and Tax fraud -- with untold misery to be reaped upon the citizens through higher energy taxes and reduced energy availability. The list of damage being done "purposely" daily by governments to our Republic is endless. And yet you think someone is cheating on their sales taxes???

Thomas Paine didn't say this as a throw away, but as a serious statement on the nature of government:

Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil; in its worst state, an intolerable one.

Considering how governments are a true danger to our Republic, I applaud any legal effort Amazon or any other entity undertakes to reduce their tax burden.

50 posted on 02/12/2011 7:16:51 AM PST by sand88
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