Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Average MPS Teacher Compensation Tops $100k/year
maciverinstitute.com ^ | 2/17./11 | staff

Posted on 02/17/2011 6:31:06 PM PST by Nachum

[Milwaukee, Wisconsin] MacIver News Service – For the first time in history, the average annual compensation for a teacher in the Milwaukee Public School system will exceed $100,000.

That staggering figure was revealed last night at a meeting of the MPS School Board.

The average salary for an MPS teacher is $56,500. When fringe benefits are factored in, the annual compensation will be $100,005 in 2011.

MacIver’s Bill Osmulski has more in this video report.

(Excerpt) Read more at maciverinstitute.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: average; compensation; mps; teacher; wisconsinshowdown
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-58 next last
Vid at link

100K a year to be a teacher in Wisconsin. Nice.

1 posted on 02/17/2011 6:31:11 PM PST by Nachum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Where can I apply?


2 posted on 02/17/2011 6:33:49 PM PST by Brilliant
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Benefits = 80% x salary ? And much of it non-taxable too . . disgusting

Especially considering the product they’re putting out now.


3 posted on 02/17/2011 6:36:38 PM PST by A_Former_Democrat (The Rodney King Riots: Courtesy of ABC, CBS, NBC & CNN)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Heck, they make as much as a Colonel in the U.S. Army.


4 posted on 02/17/2011 6:36:46 PM PST by big'ol_freeper ("[T]here is nothing so aggravating [in life] as being condescended to by an idiot" ~ Ann Coulter)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Reminds me of the teach who confronted Chris Christie complaining she couldn’t make it on her $83,000/year salary. These people are infused with an entitlement mindset...


5 posted on 02/17/2011 6:37:42 PM PST by Clock King (Ellisworth Toohey was right: My head's gonna explode.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Brilliant
Where can I apply?

I don't have a teaching degree but that should be a plus.

6 posted on 02/17/2011 6:42:29 PM PST by Graybeard58 (Of course Obama loves his country. The thing is, Sarah loves mine.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

8 month or so a year job. Plenty of holidays. Home by the afternoon.

Why do “public employees” deserve to make 2 and 3 x what private sector workers do?

Welcome to the pain that is post-U.S. 3rd world here we come...


7 posted on 02/17/2011 6:50:44 PM PST by TigerClaws
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Think it is easy? Think just anyone can so professionally destroy children’s natural inclination to learn? It isn’t! It takes a special person, and many of them, to year in year out destroy so many minds.


8 posted on 02/17/2011 6:51:17 PM PST by Leisler (Our debts are someone's profit. Follow the money, the vig.....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Anybody know how many days the kids in Milwaukee go to school each year?

Also anybody know how many hours kids in Milwaukee go to school each day?

Let’s see what the dollar per teaching hour looks like!!!


9 posted on 02/17/2011 6:58:12 PM PST by Presbyterian Reporter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

And they only work 9 mos a year.


10 posted on 02/17/2011 7:00:13 PM PST by Let's Roll (Save the world's best healthcare - REPEAL, DEFUND Obamacare!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter

180 days per year at 7 hours per day. That is 1260 hours. $79.37


11 posted on 02/17/2011 7:01:50 PM PST by LukeL (Barack Obama: Jimmy Carter 2 Electric Boogaloo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter

My back of the envelope guess is that the dollar per teaching hour in Milwaukee is about $110 per hour.


12 posted on 02/17/2011 7:01:53 PM PST by Presbyterian Reporter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Brilliant

Wisconsin?


13 posted on 02/17/2011 7:02:15 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (Islam is the religion of Satan and Mohammed was his minion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

Don’t forget that they only work about 180 days a year while the rest of us work 240.


14 posted on 02/17/2011 7:03:30 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (Islam is the religion of Satan and Mohammed was his minion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LukeL

Are they teaching 7 hours?

Isn’t it more like 5.5 hours with 1/2 hour for recess and 1 hour for noon break?


15 posted on 02/17/2011 7:04:08 PM PST by Presbyterian Reporter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter
In my high school they taught 5 periods per day or 225 minutes. The other periods were either free periods or study halls, or of course lunch.

This doesn't even factor in that 25%+ of the time we were watching movies or doing personal work which required very little effort on the teacher's part. Also with the exception of classes like calculus, chemistry, and physics, most of the curriculum can be understood within a couple of weeks of prep work.

16 posted on 02/17/2011 7:10:27 PM PST by LukeL (Barack Obama: Jimmy Carter 2 Electric Boogaloo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

“State of Wisconsin EMPLOYEES, UW GRADUATE ASSISTANTS
2011 Total Premium Rates”
http://etf.wi.gov/publications/dc_content/dc_2011/State_Rates_Page_1.pdf


“Wisconsin Retirement System
State employees are covered immediately under the Wisconsin Retirement System (WRS). Vested employee-required contributions, approximately 5% of an employee’s earnings, are made by the State on behalf of the employee. The State pays another 5-10%, depending upon the employee’s occupational status, toward the non-vested employer-required contribution.

For additional information on the WRS, please refer to the booklet entitled “Your Benefit Handbook”.

http://www.dot.state.wi.us/about/hr/jobs/pco/salary.htm


17 posted on 02/17/2011 7:13:05 PM PST by combat_boots (The Lion of Judah cometh. Hallelujah. Gloria Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: big'ol_freeper
Just spent the last half hour doing some research on this. The claim that the teachers "make" over $100,000 per year (salary and benefits combined) looks more like a claim that it costs just over $100,000 per year for each teacher!

What you do to get to that point is simply divide all public school operating costs in Milwaukee by the number of teachers in the system.

That does not mean the employees GET THAT MONEY.

For example, they pay Social Security. The school system also pays an amount about equal to that to Social Security. The employees never see the money, yet it is a cost to the system.

In reality actual salaries PAID to the employees appear to be more nearly in the $41,000 range, but to get that you need a Masters Degree and have worked in an inner city school for a requisite period of time in your career.

The medical package is claimed to cost $23,000 per annum. Even Congressmen don't get that! In fact, it's awfully tough in the United States to find a medical package in that category that's available from anyone!

Obviously people can play games with numbers ~ and in this case it looks like they did. However, they were not so careful with the terms "cost" and "pay" that I couldn't see what they were doing.

WE do not need to do that to properly portray out of control school system costs, nor do we need to claim that somehow the school principal's salary is part of the school teacher's benefit unless he or she packs a gun while patrolling the halls!

Here's a deal for Milwaukee ~ cut public school costs through the simple expedient of canning a good 3/4 of the supernumeraries and authorizing the teacher's to carry.

Things should work out in the long run, and that'll bring that average cost per teacher WAY WAY DOWN.

Oh, yeah, and get a 16 foot tall chain link fence around the parking lot so they are safe while going to their cars.

18 posted on 02/17/2011 7:16:39 PM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
The revolution is coming....most working people had no idea how much more government employees made...In the 1960s government work was like welfare..
19 posted on 02/17/2011 7:29:38 PM PST by Hojczyk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Hojczyk
Working people at most of New York's top brokerages never understood how all the poor people lived ~ until, of course, their companies failed and they ended up unemployed.

To them teachers, truck drivers and TEA Partiers were all the same thing.

20 posted on 02/17/2011 7:37:09 PM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Nachum

The average homeschooler is educated with less than $600.00 per year and scores at the 85th percentile on standardized tests. One salaried teacher giving up their career (for the kids) in WI would pay for over 200 kids to get a superlative education.


21 posted on 02/17/2011 7:43:46 PM PST by WorkingClassFilth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Nachum
Thank God, I have been saying this for at least a decade and people have tried to make me feel like a uncaring bastard. All I have listened to was how poor teachers were, that state and federal workers get shafted. When I argued that they actually do ok with great retirement benefits and cheap or free health care, many don't pay social security, what a punk I was.

Now is the time to finally end this myth. When push comes to shove they will refuse to accept pay freezes, or small payments to help fund retirement and health care, they vote to watch others get laid off, then whine that the classrooms are too crowded.

Soon people are going to start placing the blame on kids not learning on the teachers who are charged with this responsibility. Imagine that...soon we might be able to blame the post ofice for losing 10B a year. Oh the times they are a changing...

22 posted on 02/17/2011 7:50:11 PM PST by JohnD9207 (John McCain is a proud Ted Kennedy conservative!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Brilliant
"Where can I apply?"

You have to know somebody. And you might have to sell your soul.

23 posted on 02/17/2011 8:06:13 PM PST by UnwashedPeasant (Don't nuke me, bro)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Presbyterian Reporter

As a high school English teacher, on a good week, I work between 60 and 70 hours a week. At least. It’s no cake walk.


24 posted on 02/17/2011 8:06:20 PM PST by rubyjay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

It goes to show what lies people come up with.


25 posted on 02/17/2011 8:08:43 PM PST by webboy45
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: rubyjay

Really? That is certainly unusual. Please detail your schedule, since you made your claim.


26 posted on 02/17/2011 8:42:15 PM PST by gloryblaze (Don't forget to donate and keep FR going strong!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Muawiyah,

Almost none of us get the Money. I bill by the hour, and I still have the standard deductions. We all know that we have to make comparisons against non-paycheck benefits.

You have to figure in the equivalent that a real pension program would be. How much in savings out of a paycheck each year would it take to have the millions to fund a really nice retirement from around age 55 to 75? That’s real money - I don’t have any pension program and I often think about how much better off I would be with a teacher’s pension and job security.

I disagree about the health care costs too. I was with a global software company and didn’t really think that much about our “cafeteria program” - cause we didn’t see the real cost. And the benefits were great. But then I learned that it was costing 18 thousand per year. And it was easy for politicians to give on these nebulous benefits so I don’t doubt that they have the high-end Cadillac plan because these were easy for the politicians to give in negotiations.

And then factor in the weeks off at holiday time, the summers off. If you had job security, how much would you give for that kind of time freedom.

Then, as a Cheesehead let me also say that my school district has had back to back 9 percent tax increases. And the District Executive says that in no way brings them to a sustainable level. Its crazy talk.

Unemployment, employees giving back wages. I find the figures quite believable and I would like the teachers to express gratitude for the great income and benefits that they receive.

And now lets talk about Milwaukee’s ‘worst in the nation’ school performance...


27 posted on 02/17/2011 9:01:00 PM PST by sgtyork (The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage. Thucydides)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
GROUP retirement programs have a great deal of "cross subsidization". Many people pay for years and years and years ~ for their entire careers (or their employer pays in for them since that's required under the laws managing retirement systems).

Not everybody retires ~ some die before then. Then, of those who retire, some die early, some die soon after that, and yet others die a long time from now.

There's a scientific field of study called ACTUARIAL SCIENCE. It weighs the probability of death ~ based on actual data regarding death ~ and determines what it will take to sustain the retirement program for all the members out through time.

It also has to account for new entrants, and changing demographics.

Politicians like to ignore all of this since the numbers are huge and that always hurts their heads.

What happens is that your typical financing plan for any retirement system ends up appearing UNDERFUNDED. You have $X going in and $Y going out. Sometimes when the underlying investments are doing good, and new retirements are down, you may have a retirement system that looks OVERFUNDED. That always excites management since so many systems were set up so that companies could "tap" surplus retirement system funding.

Occasionally the fund managers will expand benefits such that the "surplus" gets used on behalf of the members. BTW, that's usually when a retirement system runs into trouble ~ what you have to do is look at the actuarial reports, not just the apparent balance sheet.

One general rule for most retirement systems is that you are not allowed to pass on the benefits to your heirs and assigns (except under very strenuous rules related to disabled survivors, spouses, etc). A typical individual plan would try to leave some surplus "for the kids". A group plan will leave them penniless.

I hope that helps answer some of your questions. The basic idea in a group plan is to build up a fund that can provide a retirement income for the members of the group. Some "win" and some "lose" by dying before they've been paid back.

28 posted on 02/18/2011 5:42:59 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: rubyjay
A friend of mine is a high school teacher. He's the school athletic director, head football coach, and teaches a full load. There are a total of six coaches that coach football (7-12), basketball (7-12), both boys and girls, girls volleyball, softball, baseball and track.

During the football season, in addition to teaching his full load, he does football practice, and coaches games on Thursday (7th grade, 8th grade & JV)then varsity on Friday night, reviews film on Saturdays, and has a film session with the players on Sunday afternoon. His office is about five feet by five feet. The weight room is above him, so when anyone drops a weight, dust falls, and the gym is next to him, so he has to keep the door closed to avoid being hit by stray basketballs, which make an awesome sound when they hit the door.

Can't honestly say I know what his salary is, but I can say that he's extremely happy with his job.

A lot of students from his high school come through my college program, and yes, they are competent students who can read, write, punctuate and do grammar.

I'm not going to defend all teachers, but I know some great teachers.

29 posted on 02/18/2011 6:42:02 AM PST by Richard Kimball
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
Excellent post. A couple of other points:

1. Politicians cannot see a pile of money without trying to grab it. Actually, this is true for most humans.
2. Underfunding of retirement systems USUALLY comes about like this: Contributions must equal the outgo times the number of people times a factor of rate of return. When the budget does not permit full contributions, politicians and other policy wonks don't worry about what will happen ten years down the road, they worry about making this year's budget balance and juggle the numbers. Instead of projecting the rate of return on what is a realistic number of how an investment will play out, they say, "We have X amount of dollars to put into the fund this year. What rate of return is required to make the fund look actuarially sound? A lot of funds projected a rate of return of 8-10% annually. Yes, it MIGHT happen some years, but basing a fiscal projection on a rate of return that high is nuts. You aren't going to have a rate of return of 10% unless a good credit risk is having to pay 10% on a loan. Any projected rate of return that exceeds the loan interest rate paid by a good credit risk is speculative, and could very well lose money.

As a last note, one of the things that will come up shortly is that government employees that have the option of retiring will do so in large numbers. This will put a big hit on the retirement systems.

30 posted on 02/18/2011 6:57:36 AM PST by Richard Kimball
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Richard Kimball
Noting that sometimes a fund will seem to be overfunded, that's currently the problem with the federal retirement system.

One large agency, USPS, that accounts for about 30% of all federal employees, is OVERPAID by $78 billion!

They also have to pay in advance for future retirees medical insurance.

How that came about is interesting ~ USPS discovered it'd overpaid to the federal fund backing CSRS and FERS and Health care for retirees, and was also covering the service time component of individuals who'd served in the military.

In short a massive overpayment of Biblical proportions was found ~ yet, Congress, rather than rebate the overpayment to the folks who pay postage, or to the employees who'd been overcharged as well, decided to INCREASE THE AMOUNT OF OVERPAYMENT.

In fact, Congress pretty well tripled the load.

At the moment the federal retirement system is being subsidized by postal workers, and the US government is beneficiary of a massive forced loan that pays little interest.

It's still the basic scam used to rip off the old LTV retirement fund ~ just in case anyone thinks this is peculiar to government.

31 posted on 02/18/2011 7:10:57 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: gloryblaze

It’s not all that unusual. Any good teacher, and I know there are plenty of bad ones out there, but any good teacher surely logs that many hours, if not more. My mother is a kindergarten teacher. Whenever I feel tired or overwhelmed, I just look at her. She rarely comes home before 6:00, and spends, on average, at least 12 hours in her classroom every weekend.

The sheer volume of work can be staggering. I try to have two graded assignments for each class every week. I have 150 students. Therefore, I grade at least 300 papers every single week (and good teachers grade for effort and accuracy, not simply completion). I’m also in the process of grading 70 literary analysis research papers. A good one takes about 20 minutes to grade. The ones that are, let’s say, problematic can take much longer. I teach three levels of English (freshman, sophomores, and juniors), and that means preparing three different sets of lessons and materials every week. I usually have to devote at least an entire Saturday or an entire Sunday every weekend to preparing for the coming week and grading any leftover assignments from the week before. I’m starting to put a few restrictions on myself. My latest rule is that 8:00 PM is the official cutoff for the work day.

I love my job, and I’m good at it, and I feel very accomplished to see the progress my students have made this school year. I don’t have complaints—I work hard because it’s my responsibility to educate my students to the best of my ability. And that takes time and dedication. So I don’t mean to whine. But when people act as though teaching is some cushy job, I’m irked.


32 posted on 02/18/2011 7:14:58 AM PST by rubyjay
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: rubyjay

If all your school time is spent in a full, active classroom, and all the grading and lesson plans have to be done before or after school, then kudos to you.

And if you and your Mother spend many hours of weekend time in the classroom, then more kudos.

I maintain that that is unusual.


33 posted on 02/18/2011 9:14:52 AM PST by gloryblaze (Don't forget to donate and keep FR going strong!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Kind of disappointed that you felt you need to school me.

Your short course in actuarial calculation does not change the fact that you did not list the value of that program on a present (paycheck) basis. I am quite certain that an Actuary could calculate that value taking mortality, departure from education employment. And I am also certain that for teachers who retire at ages between 55 and 65 (http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_average_age_of_retirement_for_a_teacher) the value is considerable.

A rule of thumb I read recently for retirement preparation is 20-30 percent of income.


34 posted on 02/18/2011 9:28:14 AM PST by sgtyork (The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage. Thucydides)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: rubyjay

I second the kudos. We know there are plenty of good ones and they don’t the real appreciation they should.


35 posted on 02/18/2011 9:29:47 AM PST by sgtyork (The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage. Thucydides)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Richard Kimball

Agreed. Politicians threaten solid pension management.

Don’t forget the risk that poor management - the kind performed by governments without a stake in the risk provide - will lead to outright theft...

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission warned public pension funds on Thursday that they risk running afoul of anti-fraud laws if they do not have proper procedures in place to prevent wrongdoing.

The SEC issued a report reminding public pension funds of their legal responsibilities after an agency investigation involving questions of insider trading at the Retirement Systems of Alabama (RSA).

http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/03/06/sec-pensionfunds-idUSN0624559320080306


36 posted on 02/18/2011 9:33:51 AM PST by sgtyork (The secret of happiness is freedom, and the secret of freedom, courage. Thucydides)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
Present value is frequently misused by propagandists to come up with immensely large numbers without meaning.

That's why I left it out.

The simpler term ~ that may get you to the same place ~ is called "anticipated earnings" used only with reference to the investment vehicle ~ and that may well be counseled by law over periods of time ~ e.g. no use of investments in real estate through some periods, and no use of stocks in another, and no use of bond rates in another ~ I've been around long enough to see just everything prohibited, then rehabilitated.

Frankly, using a single discount factor to bring in an average interest rate over the whole period of performance automatically disallows consideration of variations that may or may not occur in the future for short periods of time. I kind of like to keep my options open.

BTW, the federales don't use present value analysis for anything but initial land acquisition ~ USPS does it on EVERY rental, lease, new construction or rehabilitation project BTW ~ and I did THOUSANDS of them over the years. Lots of fun.

When you get right down to it the comparison of an individual retirement fund with a group fund the size of that of federal retirees is pret' near impossible ~ for one thing the federales NEVER suffer a mass die-off ~ but the individual does do that from time to time, plus his his heirs and assigns get the residual (along with the tax people).

I think that is a question better left to an organization like FIDELITY anyway.

37 posted on 02/18/2011 10:39:59 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah
The medical package is claimed to cost $23,000 per annum.

That sounds about right to me. At my company we pay 50% of the cost of the plan. Family coverage runs about $1,000 a month or so to the employee so that would make a total cost of between 23 and 24K per year.

L

38 posted on 02/18/2011 10:44:13 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
NOTE: That wasn't a lecture ~ you had an implicit question ~ to wit: How much would it cost to have a private individual retirement as lucrative as that of the teachers.

The answer is, of course, A LOT!!!! All individual plans cost more because of the risk of not dying soon enough!

39 posted on 02/18/2011 10:45:45 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
NOTE: That wasn't a lecture ~ you had an implicit question ~ to wit: How much would it cost to have a private individual retirement as lucrative as that of the teachers.

The answer is, of course, A LOT!!!! All individual plans cost more because of the risk of not dying soon enough!

40 posted on 02/18/2011 10:47:25 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Lurker
You guys spend a lot more than the federales. That may be because you have old sick people on the rolls and we have a 30% complement of young healthy adults in USPS keeping the costs lower.

Demographics make the difference.

41 posted on 02/18/2011 10:49:38 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

We have a much smaller group to work with, ergo higher costs.

Nice job losing 8.5 billion dollars last year. Congratulations. Fine work you’re doing over there.


42 posted on 02/18/2011 10:56:32 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Lurker
The USPS continued to stand ready to provide the service. Alas, the mail users failed to pay.

BTW, the real cause of all this is OVERBUILDING ~ we now have 10 million surplus homes in this country, and yet delivery has to be provided to each of them in case somebody moves in.

It's Barney Frank's fault!

43 posted on 02/18/2011 10:58:31 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Lurker
BTW, USPS is ready to slash up to $15 billion from its cost structure but Congress won't let them.

See those guys on TV today cutting $10 million here, a billion there, and USPS has this immensely large pile of stuff to give up and those some "brave souls" won't touch it.

44 posted on 02/18/2011 11:00:48 AM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Frankly the answer is to disband public schools and privatize education.


45 posted on 02/18/2011 11:27:51 AM PST by big'ol_freeper ("[T]here is nothing so aggravating [in life] as being condescended to by an idiot" ~ Ann Coulter)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: big'ol_freeper

Just leave them alone. Technology is going to unravel the entire edifice but we might want the buildings ~ for the gyms and meeting rooms if nothing else.


46 posted on 02/18/2011 2:03:40 PM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

It costs a lot for government employees and teachers as well not withstanding the pooling of risk and other actuarial factors. There is no reason not to include the considerable present value of that pension - especially when in Wisconsin it is 100 percent paid for by taxpayers.


47 posted on 02/18/2011 2:37:50 PM PST by sgtyork
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
You'd still need to have the actuaries say in public just exactly how many individuals will die each month during the build up as well as the pay out.

People really love to hear that stuff!

48 posted on 02/18/2011 3:03:47 PM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: muawiyah

Yes, I’m sure that all those pension-coveting teachers will be dissuaded from planning the first day of their retirement at 55 by those cold hard facts.

“There are some excellent teachers who want an early-out,” Parker said. “I know these teachers personally, and I’m sorry to even hear them talking about retirement.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/26/AR2008032602948.html


49 posted on 02/18/2011 5:49:01 PM PST by sgtyork
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: sgtyork
Michelle A. Rhee, the administrator supposedly coming up with an "early out" ended up on the wrong end of the stick in the last DC election.

A new Mayor came in and fired her.

What you have to remember in reading anything from DC is that the eternal rumor is "they're planning an early out". That story pops up in every water cooler conversation in every federal agency as well as the government of the District of Columbia.

Rhee didn't have backing from the people who hired her.

50 posted on 02/18/2011 6:15:30 PM PST by muawiyah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-58 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson