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Calvin Coolidge's Advice for Gov. Scott Walker
American Spectator ^ | Feb. 18, 2011

Posted on 02/26/2011 4:41:18 PM PST by T.L.Sink

[Boston, Massachusetts,1919.] The Boston police had decided - against the law - that they would organize a union. The police commissioner said they were in violation of the law. Samuel Gompers, head of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), jumped into the middle of the dispute and issued the police an AFL charter as a union. The police went on strike. The situation was rapidly deteriorating. Gov. Calvin Coolidge was furious and the police were fired. Said Coolidge: "THERE IS NO RIGHT TO STRIKE AGAINST THE PUBLIC SAFETY BY ANYBODY, ANYTIME, ANYWHERE." In his memoirs Coolidge wrote, "It was beginning to be clear that if voluntary associations were to be permitted to substitute their will for the authority of public officials the end of our government was at hand."

(Excerpt) Read more at spectator.org ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: wisconsinshowdown
The fact that Obama and the Left are owned and operated by the unions is obvious. But what makes the situation even more dire than in the 1920's when Coolidge was president is that we're now BROKE. We are now facing, for real, what Coolidge had most feared: "... the end of our government is at hand." But the socialist Obama doesn't care about our future as a nation so long as he has the support of taxpayer supported unions.
1 posted on 02/26/2011 4:41:23 PM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: T.L.Sink
Coolidge for President!

Even in his present condition.

2 posted on 02/26/2011 4:54:13 PM PST by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: T.L.Sink
Calvin Coolidge's Advice for Gov. Scott Walker.

Other advice that Calvin had for Walker is to not rely on All Season Radials in the winter. Go the extra mile and get a decent set of snow tires. Studs couldn't hurt either. Coolidge is a wealth of solid advice.


3 posted on 02/26/2011 5:15:19 PM PST by Lazlo in PA (Now living in a newly minted Red State.)
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To: Texas Eagle

Especially in his present condition.


4 posted on 02/26/2011 5:26:38 PM PST by Old Seadog (Always do a little more than is expected, and someday .....it will be expected.)
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To: Texas Eagle
Coolidge for President!

Although I'm likely among the older FReepers, I did miss out on the Calvin Coolidge administration. Everything I've read about it reveals that "Silent Cal" was likely the very best president of the 20th Century, yes, even edging out Ronald Reagan in that regard. It is my understanding that RWR did have a very high opinion of Coolidge whose thoughts on government and taxation are just as valid today as they were in 1924.

Unions are inherently evil.

Calvin Coolidge knew it and we Conservatives recognize that Marxism and unionism form a devil's alliance against freedom and liberty.
5 posted on 02/26/2011 5:27:30 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: re_nortex
Unions are inherently evil.

As in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.

6 posted on 02/26/2011 5:32:46 PM PST by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: re_nortex
Coolidge prided himself on saying only what had to be said at the time and really didn't expand on things.

He busted the police strike, but ultimately not the union, while he was Governor of Massachusetts.

Later on as President he set the stage for the Great Depression (which was made much worse by both Hoover and Roosevelt).

I spent some time this evening going through a number of his speeches and couldn't drag anything out of them that said he'd support Right to Work Laws.

BTW, in a nation where every person is a member of the people's militia and should be provided a weapon through conveniently located armories, or for home storage, or with tax credits so you could select your own, it seems to me that properly operated, the United States would only need a handful of cops ~ not these enormous paramilitary forces that think they ought to be unionized.

It's time for Conservatives to quit worrying about unions and push back until we get a fully armed and trained people's militia that can make Americans safe in America!

7 posted on 02/26/2011 5:38:14 PM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: muawiyah
Later on as President he [Coolidge] set the stage for the Great Depression (which was made much worse by both Hoover and Roosevelt).

Interesting. That's contrary to what I've read. But, if you'll read through my posting history here, I am always eager to explore those things that might be different from what I believe. In most cases, a dissenting view serves to strengthen my convictions because it leads to acquire more data from both sides.

However there are certainly exceptions so I welcome anything you have that shows Coolidge's part in laying the groundwork for the Great Depression.

For the record, I'll acknowledge Hoover's role in it. He had some definite RINO leanings (perhaps arising from his humanitarian work) and I think he meddled too much in the economy. That being said, had a second Hoover term had come to pass (albeit unlikely given the public's mood), there's no doubt that the Great Depression would not have been so "Great" nor so prolonged, both of which are decidedly the fault of Franklin Roosevelt's soft brand of Communism.

Please forgive the off-topic diversion into Hoover since I am indeed most anxious to get your thoughts on Calvin Coolidge.

8 posted on 02/26/2011 5:50:57 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: re_nortex
Coolidge was hardly a modern Conservative. He also favored OPEN BORDERS combined with a HIGH PROTECTIVE TARIFF.
9 posted on 02/26/2011 6:14:19 PM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: T.L.Sink

I have a sneakin’ suspicion that if Gov. Walker has to issue layoff notices the Wi. public employees may just walk out via strikes. We shall see what we shall see.


10 posted on 02/26/2011 6:15:58 PM PST by tflabo
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To: T.L.Sink
FDR said about the same thing. Anybody notice how there is NO collective bargaining allowed by federal gumint employees?
11 posted on 02/26/2011 6:47:14 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: muawiyah

Coolidge signed into law the last true restrictive and conservative immigration laws. He supported and signed into law legislation ending mass immigration.

With the possible exception of Eisenhower, Coolidge was the last good Republican president on immigration. Nixon can be forgiven to an extent in that the effects of Ted Kennedy’s deceptive 1965 Immigration Reform Act (which undid those signed into law by Coolidge, and reignited mass immigration) were not yet apparent. Reagan had some good things to say about border control, but he was a misguided romantic on immigration in general. And the Bushes? Well, they were both terrible, with W being as bad as any Democrat on the issue.

We need a Coolidge today when it comes to immigration. If this current wave of mass immigration is not cut off, then it is over for us. Admittedly, even if all immigration ended tomorrow, the demographic momentum of the the past 30 years of pro-Democrat immigration would continue to change the nation in a bad way for conservatives and Republicans.

But if immigration were drastically reduced, then at least we’d have a fighting chance demographically speaking.


12 posted on 02/26/2011 6:48:53 PM PST by Aetius
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To: re_nortex
Coolidge was Reagan's hero. He had a fine portrait of President Coolidge retrieved from the archives and displayed prominently in the White House. That was back when we had an American president.
13 posted on 02/26/2011 6:49:37 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: re_nortex

My favorite Coolidge aphorism is “It is easy to see why legislatures spend money. There is plenty of it laying around and it doesn’t seem to belong to anyone.”


14 posted on 02/26/2011 6:49:37 PM PST by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done needs to be done by the government!)
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To: Aetius

Coolidge ASKED FOR MORE LIBERAL naturalization standards ~ essentially an AMNESTY in modern usage!


15 posted on 02/26/2011 6:51:04 PM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: re_nortex
Beware contrarians who think that to run against the wind is a sign of intelligence. Coolidge had nothing to do with the Depression and most likely would not have made the activist mistakes of Hoover which added fuel to the fire.
16 posted on 02/26/2011 6:52:39 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: muawiyah
Coolidge was hardly a modern Conservative. He also favored OPEN BORDERS combined with a HIGH PROTECTIVE TARIFF.
People lightly toss around the RINO label for people who are actually just behind the times. High tariff and open borders was standard Republicanism that long ago. Cooledge must have had his points, for Reagan hung his portrait in the oval office.

17 posted on 02/26/2011 6:59:28 PM PST by conservatism_IS_compassion (DRAFT PALIN)
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To: muawiyah

Coolidge’s rhetoric on immigration was better than anything we’ve heard from the likes of Bush, or even Reagan.

And most importantly, and I repeat myself, he signed into law legislation that ended mass immigration. This alone marks him as the best President when it comes to immigration. Bush’s PC head would have exploded at the thought of cutting back on immigration.

Can you really put any other President from the past 110 years above Coolidge (from a conservative point of view) on immigration in terms of what he actually did?


18 posted on 02/26/2011 7:06:02 PM PST by Aetius
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To: muawiyah
Different times, and most immigrants were from different places than today. The immigrants of the Coolidge's time wanted to be Americans, to learn the language, to participate in the society. They didn't come here to join communist-leftist organizations and destroy America.
19 posted on 02/26/2011 7:11:45 PM PST by Clock King (Ellisworth Toohey was right: My head's gonna explode.)
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To: Clock King
The immigrants in Coolidge's time were mostly from Greece and Italy. Over half of them WENT BACK HOME.

They were here for the money.

20 posted on 02/26/2011 7:42:23 PM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: Aetius
Coolidge signed what he got. His rhetoric suggests he wanted easier standards for naturalization ~ he took what Congress sent him.

Not that he was a mealy-mouthed wishy-washy make a deal politician but he was still a politician ~ simply one that kept his mouth closed.

21 posted on 02/26/2011 7:43:59 PM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: hinckley buzzard
Coolidge had nothing to do with the Depression and most likely would not have made the activist mistakes of Hoover which added fuel to the fire.

Suffice it to say that, at least thus far, a compelling case to diminish my estimation of Calvin Coolidge has not been made in this venue. I still honor his place as among the true greats who held the office.

As for the "open borders" matter, Calvin Coolidge's statement makes his position abundantly clear:

American institutions rest solely on good citizenship. They were created by people who had a background of self-government. New arrivals should be limited to our capacity to absorb them into the ranks of good citizenship. America must be kept American. For this i purpose, it is necessary to continue a policy of restricted immigration. It would be well to make such immigration of a selective nature with some inspection at the source, and based either on a prior census or upon the record of naturalization. Either method would insure the admission of those with the largest capacity and best intention of becoming citizens. I am convinced that our present economic and social conditions warrant a limitation of those to be admitted. We should find additional safety in a law requiring the immediate registration of all aliens. Those who do not want to be partakers of the American spirit ought not to settle in America.

Plus there were budget surpluses each year during Coolidge's presidency. I really can't how a connection can be drawn from his prudent fiscal policies to the Great Depression.

22 posted on 02/26/2011 8:00:26 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: muawiyah

Well then I guess he was a politician since his rhetoric and words also explicitly supported restricitive immigration.

From what I’ve read the only reservation he had about signing the 1924 Reform Act was its exclusion of Japanese immigrants, but he didn’t let that stop him from doing what was best for the country and signing on the cut off of mass immigration.

Mass immigration only resumed after the 1965 Reform Act, even though its sponsors promised that it would do no such thing. The effects really weren’t evident until the 70s. If presented with a bill reestablishing caps on immigration levels, and undoing the 1964 act had been presented to Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton, Bush II, or Obama, do you think any of them would have signed it?

The answer is no. Coolidge did sign when presented with a restrictive bill, so that makes him the best President on immigration. I fully grant you that attaining such an honor isn’t hard seeing as how all those others I just mentioned were quite bad.

It should be noted, however, that Clinton initially supported the findings of the late Congresswoman Barbara Jordan’s commission on immigration reform in the mid 90s which called for cutting legal immigration by at least one-third. Would he have actually signed had it reached him? Who knows? It never made it that far, in part due to Republican supporters of mass immigration like former Senator Spencer Abraham who helped sabotage the bill. My guess is that Clinton would not have signed it, as he has since become a typcial and ardent supporter of mass immigration.


23 posted on 02/26/2011 9:10:18 PM PST by Aetius
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To: Aetius
It should be noted, however, that Clinton initially supported the findings of the late Congresswoman Barbara Jordan’s commission on immigration reform in the mid 90s which called for cutting legal immigration by at least one-third.

That commission was bipartisan, 5-4 Democrat vs. Republican. As chair, the 1995 "U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform" report bears her name, of course.

As a liberal Democrat, what do you think could have possibly caused Barbara Jordan to support any form of immigration restriction? It would seem to go counter to her partisan interests since the bulk of immigration by the mid-1990s was Mexican, a natural constituency for her party.

24 posted on 02/26/2011 10:11:25 PM PST by re_nortex (DP...that's what I like about Texas.)
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To: Lazlo in PA; Texas Eagle; Old Seadog

Another statement for which Coolidge became known (and which liberals hate) is: “The business of America is business.” A little historical anecdote about Coolidge: He was known as “Silent Cal” because, unlike most politicians, he only spoke when he felt it was important to speak. And when he did speak it was in a very concise manner. In other words, he wasn’t a typical windbag politician. Anyway, a reporter once said to Coolidge that he had a bet with a friend that he could get Coolidge to say more than two words in a private conversation. Coolidge looked at the reporter and said to him, “You lose,” and turned away. Cal had a very dry and keen sense of humor as that illustrates.


25 posted on 02/27/2011 5:23:45 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: re_nortex; muawiyah

I think it was part of the old liberal line in historiography to blame Coolidge for being a “do nothing” president and not taking steps to avert a depression. This argument was most strongly argued by the New Deal proponents. But nearly all modern historians have revised this position and reject it. First, because they realize the New Deal itself didn’t do that. Second, because economists are now aware of data (previously unavailable) that reveal the international currency and monetary connections of the global market. Americans in the 20’s were largely isolationist after WWI and didn’t want to get involved in foreign affairs. But, as we all know now, that was a fantasy. Coolidge isn’t blamed by historians for not knowing what no one else could have known at the time.


26 posted on 02/27/2011 5:44:56 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: tflabo

You may be right but I suspect that the unions (already unpopular according to polls) may fear a public backlash. The thing that is really different now than in any previous time is that we’re BROKE. Even unions can’t get blood out of a turnip! If there is such a public reaction the unions may lose not only wage demands but collective bargaining. But, as you say, it will be interesting to how this unfolds.


27 posted on 02/27/2011 5:58:37 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: hinckley buzzard

Right, and not only FDR but that old true blue unionist George Meany! Such a sort of collective bargaining as is now being defended was NEVER envisioned by the mainstream labor movement.


28 posted on 02/27/2011 6:04:07 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: muawiyah; All

The immigration issue then and now are totally unrelated. First, immigrants then came overwhelmingly from Europe and had completely different cultural and work-ethic values than many today. Second, and most important, labor for the rapidly growing industrial and manufacturing base of the nation was in fact desperately needed. The reality today when the declining manufacturing base has been eclipsed by information-processing and high-tech cyberntics is a different world ENTIRELY than the 1920’s. No serious comparison can be made.


29 posted on 02/27/2011 6:16:19 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: T.L.Sink

Calvin Coolide 1 of the only 2 decent presidents we have had in over 100 years.

We need a lot of Coolidge now...yet no one ever hears how great this president was...he was even better than Reagan.


30 posted on 02/27/2011 6:21:14 AM PST by surfer (To err is human, to really foul things up takes a Democrat, don't expect the GOP to have the answer!)
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To: re_nortex

Amen...Coolidge was the best.

We have the trifecta of disaster looming in our country the combination of 1919, 1929 and 1939...

And the result will be the same...progressives are just never happy until millions suffer and die.

Truly a twisted mentally ill bunch they are.


31 posted on 02/27/2011 6:23:36 AM PST by surfer (To err is human, to really foul things up takes a Democrat, don't expect the GOP to have the answer!)
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To: Lazlo in PA
That photograph of President Coolidge is almost unique. He's smiling. No toothy grin, mind you, but downright "warm," unlike every other photograph I have ever seen of him.

Put another way, in a lifetime of studying the presidents - and photographs of the presidents in particular - that is literally the first one I can remember that managed to capture Cal with anything resembling a smile.

Check it for yourself!

He's almost always photographed with the same thin-lipped, albeit "no-nonsense" flat and "Vulcan" expression, not a frown but not a smile, either.

Live long and prosper...

32 posted on 02/27/2011 6:29:19 AM PST by Prospero (non est ad astra mollis e terris via)
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To: surfer

I agree that Coolidge doesn’t get the praise he deserves. But I think Reagan is far greater and may be rated one of the best of the 20th century. Why? His challenges were vastly greater than those faced by Coolidge. He precipitated the collapse of the Soviet Union, created 22 million new jobs, and - above all - restored our national pride after the humiliations and failures of Jimmy Carter. That cites only a few of his great accomplishments.


33 posted on 02/27/2011 6:30:47 AM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: T.L.Sink
"It was beginning to be clear that if voluntary associations were to be permitted to substitute their will for the authority of public officials the end of our government was at hand. The issue was nothing less than whether the law which the people had made through their duly authorized agencies should be supreme."

-- Calvin Coolidge

Great quote.

34 posted on 02/27/2011 6:33:13 AM PST by EternalVigilance (But what is Freedom? Rightly understood, a universal license to be good. -- Hartley Coleridge)
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To: EternalVigilance
In quaint New England farmhouse on an early summer's day,
A farmer's boy became our Chief in a homely simple way
With neither pomp nor pageantry, he firmly met the task
To keep him on that job of his is all the people ask. (That's..all..they...ask)

So...

"Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" is the slogan of the day
"Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" for the good ol' U.S.A.
A lot of politicians cannot do a thing but knock
But Calvin Coolidge is a man of action and not talk!

So just "Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" in the White House, four years more,
We have a chance to do it in this year of '24,

He's been tried, he's never wanting,
He is giving of his best,

So "Keep Cool and Keep Coolidge" is our country's mighty test!


35 posted on 02/27/2011 7:10:20 AM PST by Prospero (non est ad astra mollis e terris via)
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To: T.L.Sink

My son has to do a report and Power Point presentation on a President. He chose Coolidge (I also threw Reagan out there, but he chose Cal). His dad and I are so proud ;)


36 posted on 02/27/2011 7:15:19 AM PST by Hoosier Catholic Momma (I'm not breaking down, I'm breaking out...last chance to lose control.--Muse 'Hysteria')
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To: T.L.Sink
He for sure wouldn't be making the rounds of talk shows like Fidel Obama:

He once explained to Bernard Baruch why he often sat silently through interviews: "Well, Baruch, many times I say only 'yes' or 'no' to people. Even that is too much. It winds them up for twenty minutes more."

Silent Cal

37 posted on 02/27/2011 7:33:59 AM PST by Madame Dufarge
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To: re_nortex

My guess is that this was one instance where a politician put the interests of her constituents and the nation as a whole above the interests of her political party. Maybe that’s naive. Maybe I’m missing something.

Jordan know doubt knew that Mexicans are natuarl Democrats (despite the delusions of people like Karl Rove, Michael Barone, and Richard Land saying otherwise), but perhaps she realized that an unending influx of them is not good for black Americans. Other black leaders must know that mass immigration is bad for most blacks, but they have obviously embraced it as a way to create permanent, demographic dominance for the Democrats and the Left. Once they get that, then they can redistribute even more wealth away from whites towards non-whites. Perhaps Jordan was more concerned about the average black person. Perhaps Jordan didn’t think the Mexicanization of the country is a good thing.

I don’t know for sure. I should probably read up more on her commission. It was a shame though that a restrictive bill might have passed had it not been for Republicans like Spence Abraham. Then again, I don’t think her recommendations went far enough. I think legal immigration should be cut by more like 3/4 or 4/5, down to no more than 200,000 per year, which would include all categories of immigrants inlcuding refugees and asylum seekers.


38 posted on 02/27/2011 7:41:35 AM PST by Aetius
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To: T.L.Sink
The Oriental Exclusion ACTS ~ 1881, 1924, etc. prove that NOT ALL immigrants were welcome ~ and that the US Congress knew very well what it was up to.

Wasn't just a "white preference" either ~ the 1875 act was aimed at "undesirables" ~ a choice term, but it usually meant any East Asian person arriving as a contract laborer or to be a prostitute, or just about anybody else Customs clerks didn't like.

At the same time there was agitation to slow down immigrants from Southern Europe and Eastern Europe.

BTW, whatever each of us claims about any of our immigrant ancestors it is always "immigrants then weren't like those today ~ they all wanted to become Americans". Which, of course, is total nonsense.

Many of mine arrived as Swedish captives ~ kidnapped for the purpose of settling a new commercial venture called New Sweden.

That failed, they all escaped and moved to Pennsylvania. Their job was to cut trees for the Swedish and British navies. Many of them figured out it was more lucrative to cut trees off more distant land to prep it for sale to new settlers ~ they became "The Cutting Edge".

They hadn't intended to come to America, and when they got here they had no idea where it was, nor did they even really know where they'd come from. No one spoke their language, nor did they speak theirs, and they despised Swedes and English people.

No, immigrants in the good old days were different ~ they wanted to survive.

39 posted on 02/27/2011 9:14:49 AM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: re_nortex
HIGH PROTECTIVE TARIFFS ~ the second highest in US history, were passed in 1930 ~ ON TOP OF the existing high tariffs ~ and whether or not they were passed into law under Coolidge, it's worth noting that between 1925 and 1929, there were thirty-three general revisions with substantial tariff changes in twenty-six European nations, and seventeen revisions and changes in Latin America. In 1927 and 1928, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand all raised their tariff rates in response to the Fordney-McCumber Tariff.

And Coolidge did nothing ~ apparently thinking that prohibitory tariffs against American products and food were good for somebody ~ certainly not Americans.

What I blamed Coolidge for was for creating the environment that allowed the Great Depression to occur, as he did by advocating high protective tariffs.

40 posted on 02/27/2011 9:27:33 AM PST by muawiyah (Make America Safe For Americans)
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To: Prospero

Nice.


41 posted on 02/27/2011 9:40:08 AM PST by EternalVigilance (But what is Freedom? Rightly understood, a universal license to be good. -- Hartley Coleridge)
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To: EternalVigilance; All
The Iconic Coolidge, wearing Sioux Head Dress: Coolidge was officially adopted into a Sioux tribe for his work [Bettmann/CORBIS/History.com].

Cool Cal.

42 posted on 02/27/2011 11:07:02 AM PST by Prospero (non est ad astra mollis e terris via)
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To: Prospero

Free sample of your song from earlier:

http://www.amazon.com/Keep-Cool-Coolidge-Calvin/dp/B000S3BO5O


43 posted on 02/27/2011 12:16:49 PM PST by EternalVigilance (But what is Freedom? Rightly understood, a universal license to be good. -- Hartley Coleridge)
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