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Popular Veterans Advocate Kills Self after War Tours
yahoo ^

Posted on 04/15/2011 8:39:22 AM PDT by wyowolf

WASHINGTON – Handsome and friendly, Clay Hunt so epitomized a vibrant Iraq veteran that he was chosen for a public service announcement reminding veterans that they aren't alone. The 28-year-old former Marine corporal earned a Purple Heart after taking a sniper's bullet in his left wrist. He returned to combat in Afghanistan. Upon his return home, he lobbied for veterans on Capitol Hill, road-biked with wounded veterans and performed humanitarian work in Haiti and Chile. Then, on March 31, Hunt bolted himself in his Houston apartment and shot himself.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: clayhunt; marine; mentalillness; military; ptsd; rip; suicide; veteran
Very Sad :(
1 posted on 04/15/2011 8:39:25 AM PDT by wyowolf
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To: wyowolf

Sorry to hear of his decision to end his life at such a young age. RIP


2 posted on 04/15/2011 8:52:53 AM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi ... Godspeed .. Monthly Donor Onboard .. Obama: Epic Fail or Bust!!!)
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To: wyowolf
It never goes away. You just deal with it, one way or the other.

Semper Fi, Marine
3 posted on 04/15/2011 8:52:58 AM PDT by ComputerGuy (HM2/USN M/3/3 Marines RVN 66-67)
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To: wyowolf

May God bless Clay Hunt and comfort his grieving family. I have no doubt that his American hero is having a joyous reunion with his fallen friends in Heaven.


4 posted on 04/15/2011 8:53:11 AM PDT by American Quilter (DEFUND OBAMACARE.)
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To: wyowolf

Every warrior comes away with their own demons, but the greater the scars the greater the pain.

I was in the Army during Vietnam and most of those poor guys that came back were sad & scary figures.

God bless them all.


5 posted on 04/15/2011 8:54:56 AM PDT by fuzzybutt (Democrat Lawyers are the root of all evil.)
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To: wyowolf

Not to minimize this tragedy, but did this person have any other aspects to his life besides military issues that could have some significance in this.


6 posted on 04/15/2011 8:55:06 AM PDT by 1raider1
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To: ComputerGuy
It never goes away.

I've never been in combat so I don't know what you're talking about. What never goes away?

7 posted on 04/15/2011 8:55:39 AM PDT by LouAvul
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To: wyowolf
I agree it's a terrible waste. To physically survive war, but still be in a war zone of sorts. I saw a story about him this morning on CNN and he certainly seemed like a fine young man who was struggling mightily to overcome his demons.


8 posted on 04/15/2011 8:57:29 AM PDT by Mila
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To: wyowolf

more here. Very sad.

http://www.aolnews.com/2011/04/09/clay-hunt-marine-who-campaigned-for-veterans-commits-suicide/


9 posted on 04/15/2011 8:59:22 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: wyowolf
People who adapt to extreme situations sometimes find themselves lost when there is no action or immediate purpose possible.

Some break, and react in what they believe to be a proactive controlled manner. They simply assume they will go somewhere else.

It is indeed a sad thing.

10 posted on 04/15/2011 8:59:29 AM PDT by mmercier (warrior class)
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To: American Quilter

Prayer bump.


11 posted on 04/15/2011 9:02:25 AM PDT by SZonian (July 27, 2010. Life begins anew.)
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To: LouAvul
PTSD
Survivor's Guilt
Being frustrated with the VA

I've never actually experienced any of that stuff myself, but I hear that a bad case of even one of them can cause an increase in one's suicide potential.
12 posted on 04/15/2011 9:07:24 AM PDT by ComputerGuy (HM2/USN M/3/3 Marines RVN 66-67)
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To: wyowolf

I think I just saw the ad he did 2 days ago on tv.
Tragic


13 posted on 04/15/2011 9:08:55 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: wyowolf

My heart goes out to this Marine’s family.. It can be very tough coming back from war, sounds like this Marine had it a lot worse than I did in ‘ol Sand Box


14 posted on 04/15/2011 9:11:42 AM PDT by nanis
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To: LouAvul
It never goes away.

I've never been in combat
so I don't know what you're talking about.
What never goes away?

I'm a Physician
Having been at the bedside of over a hundred people
who have died in my presence...
The sense of failure and grief are intense

The... Damage never goes away

It's one of those things that
If you don't know, I can't tell you
You have to be there to understand...

Ask a Woman who has had their Child Die
Ask a Priest who has a Parishoner Suicide

15 posted on 04/15/2011 9:17:52 AM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: LouAvul

Unity and desire to maintain.

Separation from group is more painful than dying with group.


16 posted on 04/15/2011 9:20:54 AM PDT by mmercier
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To: fuzzybutt
"Every warrior comes away with their own demons".

No "every warrior" does not, because (a) not "every warrior" has such "demons" in the first place and (b) not "every warrior" spends the ENTIRE rest of their life expelling any "demons" they did obtain; if they ever had them in the first place.

Some people were never cut out to be soldiers in the first place.

"I was in the Army during Vietnam and most of those poor guys that came back were sad & scary figures."

Again, NOT TRUE.

Of the approximately 2.6 million soldiers who served "in country" during the Vietnam war, "MOST" of them DID NOT return as "sad & scary figures". A "great number"?? Yes. Most? No. "Most" came back as and remained well adjusted individuals.

Just like the case with the young hero of this story; we need to honor his record of bravery, heroism, love of country, and desire and drive to help his fellow vets. But, "MOST" returning vets from the Iraq and Afghan theaters are NOT living with his demons or meeting his tragic end. As real and tragic as these stories are, they are never reflective of MOST vets. MOST vets do not develop such demons and among those who do, MOST are made of stronger stuff in dealing with them.

17 posted on 04/15/2011 9:30:31 AM PDT by Wuli
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To: 1raider1
did this person have any other aspects to his life besides military issues that could have some significance in this.
From the story ... "Last year, Hunt's life took a downward spiral. His marriage ended, he dropped out of school ..."
Who knows, maybe alcohol and drugs were involved too. Whatever, the burden was too much even for a good Marine.
18 posted on 04/15/2011 9:32:57 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: LouAvul

What never goes away?
+++++++++++++++++
No way to answer that question. No way describe it.

It is just what it is. If you jumped out of bed with an adrenaline surge, every time you hear a bump downstairs or a noise outside or change lanes with the slightest bit of debris on the road or sat staring at your double bolted front door waiting for it to come crashing down followed by whatever...

It does get better. It just takes lots of time even years.


19 posted on 04/15/2011 9:39:25 AM PDT by 240B (he is doing everything he said he wouldn't and not doing what he said he would)
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To: wyowolf

Be at peace, Marine.


20 posted on 04/15/2011 9:57:34 AM PDT by struwwelpeter
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To: LouAvul
If you read some of the better books written by combat veterans you can probably gain a handle on what these men have to deal with. The best one I've read is With the Old Breed at Peleliu and Okinawa by Eugene Sledge.

That's assuming, of course, that your comment/question was serious. If you were being obtuse then you have issues beyond what a book can help.

21 posted on 04/15/2011 10:05:29 AM PDT by katana
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To: wyowolf

Prayers for the repose of his soul and for the comfort of his friends and family.


22 posted on 04/15/2011 10:07:10 AM PDT by mountainbunny
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To: wyowolf

Sorry he took himself out. Somehow he fell thru the cracks. Shoulda never happened. RIP


23 posted on 04/15/2011 10:15:36 AM PDT by gitmogrunt
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To: katana
That's assuming, of course, that your comment/question was serious. If you were being obtuse then you have issues beyond what a book can help.

That's an uncalled for response. It is you who are in danger of being obtuse.

24 posted on 04/15/2011 10:56:07 AM PDT by LouAvul
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To: Wuli

Are speaking from personal knowledge?


25 posted on 04/15/2011 11:01:02 AM PDT by sport
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To: wyowolf
I heard about this a couple of days ago....very sad.

Prayers up for his loved ones and prayers up that Corporal Hunt is at peace.

26 posted on 04/15/2011 11:13:40 AM PDT by Allegra (Hey! Stop looking at my tagline like that.)
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To: LouAvul

Sorry, but the way you phrased the question it could have been taken as flippant and I do apologise.


27 posted on 04/15/2011 11:16:24 AM PDT by katana
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To: wyowolf; All
RIP.

I see the know nothings are out in force criticizing the deceased.

28 posted on 04/15/2011 11:17:43 AM PDT by newzjunkey (2009: Obama promised to cut Bush deficits in half. 2011: He's tripled them.)
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To: 240B
It is just what it is. If you jumped out of bed with an adrenaline surge, every time you hear a bump downstairs or a noise outside or change lanes with the slightest bit of debris on the road or sat staring at your double bolted front door waiting for it to come crashing down followed by whatever...

The first two...I definitely relate.

And I used to love big fireworks shows....but I was home for the Fourth of July in '08 and attended the display in downtown Houston. The sounds made me edgy and uncomfortable.

29 posted on 04/15/2011 11:20:20 AM PDT by Allegra (Hey! Stop looking at my tagline like that.)
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To: HangnJudge
The sense of failure and grief are intense The... Damage never goes away

Former EMS, here, Doc.

Yes, the sense of failure and grief are intense, but only until you realize that some things are meant to be.

If you are willing to do your human best, even to the point of what would be described as 'superhuman effort', and yet fail, there just might be a reason.

We don't understand any more than a small part of God's plan, and usually that in retrospect years later. Frankly, we aren't capable of understanding all of it any better than someone who only ever saw a gear tooth move understands a Grandfather Clock.

'Handling it' amounts to trusting that the creator of all is in control, and He knows what He is doing.

Everything happens for a reason, whether we understand it or not.

Funny, how the more learned we are, the tougher that is to accept.

That doesn't mean we shouldn't do all we can to stop injustice, combat the evils of this world, help those in need, comfort those in pain, and heal the sick and injured, it just means that it won't always work--even if we did everything right, and we won't understand why, at least at the moment.

When we have done all we can, it is in God's hands, and trusting Him is the key to sleeping at night.

30 posted on 04/15/2011 11:47:28 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Allegra

Too bad about the soldier. I suspect there must be something we don’t know. This is an unusual case. Even the guys in the field usually have a significant, personal reason.

It gets better with time as you learn to trust your surroundings again. I’m much better now than I was a year ago. It took me 8 months just to let my hair grow out and I still wake up instinctively at 5AM. And working with a VA counselor. (recommended)

I know what you mean. I get the same uncomfortable feeling with war movies.

It actually surprised me. Clicked on Band of Brothers one day and found that I couldn’t watch it. It made me uncomfortable and nervous. No more war movies, I can live with that. Don’t want to see anymore of that crap anyway.


31 posted on 04/15/2011 12:02:09 PM PDT by 240B (he is doing everything he said he wouldn't and not doing what he said he would)
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To: ComputerGuy

“It never goes away.”

The awful, helpless realization that you have become cannon fodder, a pawn, in a politicians’ game.


32 posted on 04/15/2011 1:48:53 PM PDT by charlie72
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To: ComputerGuy

I watched my dad let himself go, slowly. From Vietnam he always carried the fallen brothers he lost. He also had the 1000 meter stare. Not being wounded when so many died in his company really hurt him. RIP Ron 173rd Airborne 67-68. And god bless this marine.


33 posted on 04/15/2011 2:04:10 PM PDT by crazydad
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To: Smokin' Joe
When we have done all we can,
it is in God's hands,
and trusting Him is the key to sleeping at night.

We Know these Answers
Applying them is another Thing

And for you a Benediction:

Live in Peace
Live in Victory
Know that there is also Love in this World

34 posted on 04/15/2011 2:05:20 PM PDT by HangnJudge
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To: HangnJudge
We Know these Answers

Applying them is another Thing

And for you a Benediction:

Live in Peace
Live in Victory
Know that there is also Love in this World

Thank you FRiend. I wish the same for you, and anyone troubled by the places they have been and things they have seen.

It takes time and practice, but gets easier each day, no matter where you start. After a while, trusting in Him becomes second-nature. The going truly gets easier further on.

35 posted on 04/15/2011 2:29:07 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Tearful ping


36 posted on 04/15/2011 4:33:11 PM PDT by SandRat (Duty - Honor - Country! What else needs said?)
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To: wyowolf

RIP.


37 posted on 04/15/2011 4:57:51 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Amber Lamps !"~~)
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To: sport

Personal anecdotal experience of some does not back up the known statistics regarding “most”.

And even my own anecdotal experience, of my own family and friends and those that served in ‘Nam - quite a few - does NOT even back up the views driven by the anecdotal experiences of some who met tragedy or knew someone who did.

War IS hell; and those that suffer the most from it deserve our understanding, respect and support, but it is erroneous to assume that PTSD is a universal outcome of ALL soldiers; not even “most” would be close to the truth.


38 posted on 04/16/2011 12:41:33 PM PDT by Wuli
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To: Wuli

I think I understand what you are saying:Some could cope and some couldn’t.


39 posted on 04/16/2011 1:20:50 PM PDT by sport
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To: sport

“I think I understand what you are saying:Some could cope and some couldn’t.”

I am saying more than that. It is my belief that “most” can cope.


40 posted on 04/16/2011 1:32:03 PM PDT by Wuli
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