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College Education: Another bubble ready to burst!
Bennington Banner ^ | 04/19/2011 | Audrey Pietrucha

Posted on 04/19/2011 8:55:52 AM PDT by SeekAndFind

Senator Bernie Sanders added a new victim to the long list in his most recent column -- college students. Sanders complained that the Republican budget proposal would reduce the average Pell higher education grant by 17 percent at a time when the cost of a college education is "soaring."

Having just sent the last of my three children off to college, I cannot argue with Sanders’ description of college tuition costs -- they are, indeed, soaring. Statistics confirm personal observation as, according to the Measuring Up 2008 report by the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, tuition and fees for U.S. colleges and universities increased by 439 percent between 1982 and 2007.

Over this same period, median family income rose only 147 percent. In fact, a line graph showing increases in medical, housing and education costs in comparison to the Consumer Price Index has education on top, far and away.

Maintaining the current level of higher education funding, or worse, raising it, does nothing to address the issue of why college costs are rising so much faster than others. In fact, it may be ignoring one of the biggest factors in increasing costs. Much of the upward pressures on college costs can be traced directly to government involvement in education financing. Colleges charge more because the government makes sure the money will be paid.

Aid to college students has increased at well above the rate of inflation over the past few decades. In 1990 the federal government provided $19 billion in grants and loan guarantees. By 2000 that number had climbed to $63 billion. The 2009 federal budget included more than $129 billion in federal assistant to college students, and President Obama’s 2012 budget raises that amount to nearly 167 billion, a $38 billion or 29 percent increase in three years.

It is not unreasonable to observe that once a third party takes partial responsibility for costs, both consumers and providers become a lot more careless about how that money is used.

There are a number of games being played by our colleges and universities to justify rising costs. One is to send out a gazillion brochures to every high school kid who’s even sneezed in the direction of the SAT so as to attract as many applicants as possible. Since there are only so many openings, the school then gets to reject a whole lot of those applicants (and still keep their $50 to $80 application fees) and appear more "exclusive."

The more exclusive they appear, the more they can charge for their services. The current crop of students and their parents have accepted this unquestioningly and have shown a willingness to pay, with help from Uncle Sam, top dollar for what they believe will be a superior education.

Meanwhile, college costs show no sign of moderating and more young people are starting their working lives saddled with significant amounts of debt, only some of which is federally subsidized.

"Cheap" loans lure many young people into higher education despite their lack of serious interest in academic pursuits. That many students are attending college for the wrong reasons is borne out by some disappointing findings: Six-year graduation rates for bachelor’s students is only about 56 percent; college students devote 3.2 hours to education on an average weekday, versus 3.9 hours to "leisure and sports;" and almost half of full-time college students binge drink or abuse drugs, with the incidence of such behaviors rising.

Since these young people still have to repay their loans, whether or not they actually benefit from their time spent in college or complete their degrees, should warrant more caution on the parts of parents, students and institutions.

There are a few colleges that have not joined this circle of folly, and these exceptions help prove the rule. One of them is Grove City College, a small, private liberal arts college in western Pennsylvania. GCC does not accept any money tied to federal funding, including Pell Grants, federally guaranteed student loans and even scholarships. GCC prides itself on being academically rigorous as well as affordable.

For the 2010-11 school year GCC charged students about $21,000 for tuition, room and board. Compare this to the average private college costs of slightly more than $37,000 for the same academic fiscal year. Somehow Grove City is able to provide a quality education without the federal dollar infusion and does it at almost half the average cost.

Government-guaranteed loans and grants distort the true cost of education. If parents and students start refusing to take on excessive debt in order to pay the hyper-inflated tuition rates being fueled by third-party involvement in education financing, we should soon see a downward shift in higher education costs. Wiser consumers could provide the good, sharp pin of which the higher education bubble is in dire need.

-- Audrey Pietrucha helps coordinate the Vermont Liberty Alliance


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bloat; bubble; college; colleges; cost; education; gouging; tuition
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1 posted on 04/19/2011 8:55:56 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Gee, government interference in the market place dislocates stuff— just like in housing.


2 posted on 04/19/2011 8:57:43 AM PDT by Lysandru
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To: SeekAndFind

The cost of higher education is going up and up and up because they can dip into federal funds. There’s no basic reason that costs should be so high.


3 posted on 04/19/2011 9:00:17 AM PDT by RC2
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To: All
Grossly inefficient higher education, among other destructive occurrences, has created a nice little safe cocoon for heinously unproductive, overpaid and often talentless academics.

It is a bubble that has been LONG overdue for some SERIOUS bursting.

4 posted on 04/19/2011 9:01:30 AM PDT by EyeGuy (Gimme Shelter)
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To: SeekAndFind

>>...at a time when the cost of a college education is “soaring.” <<

The author forgot to add, “and the value of a college education is plummeting.”

My youngest daughter is doing her post graduate engineering work now. She is deferring her graduation until next fall because she is in a relatively well paying internship and loses that job once she graduates. Even though her grades are stellar, and she beet out 4,000 candidates for the job she currently does in this internship, there is no work for her out there. And engineering is one of the few places that a college education is a MUST. Brain surgery would be another.

Businesses have been wising up to the MBA for a long time now as well. I have no doubt the higher education bubble is about to collapse. It is not about if. It is about when.


5 posted on 04/19/2011 9:02:28 AM PDT by RobRoy (The US today: Revelation 18:4)
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To: SeekAndFind
If parents and students start refusing to take on excessive debt in order to pay the hyper-inflated tuition rates being fueled by third-party involvement in education financing, we should soon see a downward shift in higher education costs.

I wonder how he thinks they could do this. Not attend college? Not attend top ranked colleges? The parents and students are squeezed in the middle with nowhere to go.

6 posted on 04/19/2011 9:04:27 AM PDT by Prokopton
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To: RC2

You are so right! I went to college when we could work and afford the tuition without our parents having to remortgage our home. I remember the days when you could afford to go to a doctor and/or dentist without having medical/dental either. I know we can never go back, but perhaps the concepts would serve us well for decisions going forward.


7 posted on 04/19/2011 9:05:32 AM PDT by myrabach
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To: RC2

Why should State Universities exist when a good number of students leave the state immediately after graduation. What benefit does the state get for their money?


8 posted on 04/19/2011 9:07:04 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: SeekAndFind

I think we are just awakening to the tip of the iceberg.

It’s a perfect storm. The college gets the money and the student is saddled with the debt. Many diploma mills are registering homeless people. They talk them into completing the FASFA application, take the money and could care less if they ever see the “student” again.


9 posted on 04/19/2011 9:11:58 AM PDT by IamConservative (Liberalism - the surety of knowing that which cannot be proven.)
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To: Lysandru

In the late ‘70s when my daughter was 8 or so, I decided that Duke was a good place to send her. So I began to put aside enough to pay for four years at the school, based on what was charge in 1979. By the time she graduated, I had discovered that costs at that school had gone up exponentially, So she went somewhere else. My theory is that when the school saw that the feds would give loans, they made plans to spend it. When the Reagan Administration began to cut back, they had already committed themselves. So they jacked up tuition, fees etc. amd gulled parents with the promise of a relatively cheap Ivy League education. When ther federal money began to come back. they continued to raise the costs, charging what the markey would bear. What happened in health, happend also in education. Too much of a good thing.


10 posted on 04/19/2011 9:12:40 AM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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To: Prokopton

RE: I wonder how he thinks they could do this. Not attend college? Not attend top ranked colleges?


If you can get aid from top ranked private colleges and you can afford the difference in tuition, I say go for it.

If you can’t, why worry yourself over it?

There is no rule in life that says you must go to Harvard or Yale to be successful in life.

How about attending STATE COLLEGES and if that does not appeal, considering CONSERVATIVE COLLEGES that do not take Federal government money?

There are quite a few of the latter you know... the article mentions the excellent Grove city College ( ranked in the top 20% in terms of value for money in a survey by Payscale, see here : http://www.payscale.com/education/average-cost-for-college-ROI-2010 ).

Hillsdale College is another one to consider ( Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh and Mark Levin have been raving about this college ).

There are many more and I’m sure posters can post their own favorite conservative colleges here.


11 posted on 04/19/2011 9:16:02 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: Lysandru

Anytime a seller of a product or service knows that every person walking in their door AUTOMATICALLY has access through loan or otherwise, a set minimal amount of money available to them, there is no reason whatsoever to ever charge less than that amount of money.

Guaranteed Student loans, Section 8 rental vouchers, etc all create artificial floors on the cost of products or services and any seller of such products or services sees no reason to EVER price their product below that minimum, in fact, given that is the minimum they know everyone has, if they feel they are providing more than the bare minimum they feel naturally obligated to charge above and beyond that floor.

There is no downward pressure on price below that floor.


12 posted on 04/19/2011 9:16:23 AM PDT by HamiltonJay
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To: SeekAndFind
Regardless of one's opinion of him, I always think of Bill Gates who NEVER WENT TO COLLEGE...

Multi-billionaire

13 posted on 04/19/2011 9:20:00 AM PDT by Huebolt (It's not over until there is not ONE DEMOCRAT HOLDING OFFICE ANYWHERE. Not even a dog catcher!)
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14 posted on 04/19/2011 9:20:52 AM PDT by TheOldLady
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To: RC2
It also keeps rising because a lot of American parents will do absolutely ridiculous things to make sure they can "afford" to send their kids to outrageously priced schools.

I'll never understand how smart people who tend to be pretty careful with their money are willing to mortgage their own futures (let alone their kids' futures) by p!ssing away $45,000+ per year on an undergraduate education.

15 posted on 04/19/2011 9:23:02 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: Huebolt

Actually Bill Gates went to college ( Harvard ), he dropped out.

So did Apple’s Steve Jobs.

BTW, Abraham Lincoln never went to college.


16 posted on 04/19/2011 9:27:04 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

It is no surprise that liberals disproportionally populate college faculties.

Instead of someone standing up and saying that the cost of college education is inflated far beyond all reasonable value, we have to simply increase the amount of taxpayer dollars allocated towards subsidizing faculty payrolls.

I may have missed it, but I will be dollars to doughnuts that the phrase “for the children/students” is in there somewhere.


17 posted on 04/19/2011 9:27:27 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: SeekAndFind
There are quite a few of the latter you know... the article mentions the excellent Grove city College ( ranked in the top 20% in terms of value for money in a survey by Payscale,

My son and I are going to a reception tonight for students who have just been admitted to Notre Dame. It's #9 on the list of best value for the money : )..... but it still costs $182,0000 for four years. : (

18 posted on 04/19/2011 9:29:24 AM PDT by Prokopton
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To: myrabach

I joined the military, got the GI Bill, and went to a State College when I got out. I commuted to school, lived at home with my parents who were more than happy to waive rent as long as I was going to school, and graduated with a degree and no debt.

No way my parents would have been able to send me to Harvard even if I had wanted to go, and I wasn’t going to strap them with that.

It is related to living within your means, and spending 250-500K on a college education isn’t living within your means for most people.


19 posted on 04/19/2011 9:31:24 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: HamiltonJay

Exactly.


20 posted on 04/19/2011 9:32:31 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: SeekAndFind

“Aid to college students has increased at well above the rate of inflation over the past few decades. In 1990 the federal government provided $19 billion in grants and loan guarantees. By 2000 that number had climbed to $63 billion. The 2009 federal budget included more than $129 billion in federal assistant to college students, and President Obama’s 2012 budget raises that amount to nearly 167 billion, a $38 billion or 29 percent increase in three years.”

Unfortunately, these numbers substantially underestimate the government’s role in higher education. Democrats nationalized student loans, a little noticed law because it was passed at the same time as Obamacare using the same rat dirty trick. The previous model for student loans was a government subsidy along with private sector financing and risk taking. The Democrats now have eliminated private sector financing incorrectly arguing that government subsidies could be saved by nationalizing the program. The subsidies revealed the cost of the very favorable loan terms.

Along with nationalization, Democrats have increased the subsidies without having the subsidies directly shown in the budget. Democrats have sharply reduced interest rates (6% to 4.5% in the last 2 years), expanded income contingent repayment, provided loan foregiveness to government and non profit employees, and expanded disability loan foregiveness. Thousands of ex students are now applying for disability to discharge their student loan debt.


21 posted on 04/19/2011 9:32:36 AM PDT by businessprofessor
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To: Alberta's Child
I'll never understand how smart people who tend to be pretty careful with their money are willing to mortgage their own futures (let alone their kids' futures) by p!ssing away $45,000+ per year on an undergraduate education.

My son worked very hard to be #1 out of 500 students while lettering in two sports and working in the summers. He has been accepted by Notre Dame, where he wants to go. It's pretty hard not to do whatever it takes to get him there.

22 posted on 04/19/2011 9:33:53 AM PDT by Prokopton
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To: SeekAndFind

By the phrase “...the phrase “for the children/students” is in there somewhere...” I meant in the liberal argument, not the article itself...


23 posted on 04/19/2011 9:35:59 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: Prokopton

I understand what you mean, and agree that for a parent, whatever can be borne for the sake of their offspring is a decision to be made completely by them.

The problem is the inflated value due to all the taxpayer money pumped into the higher education system through grants of all types.

And, again, it boils down to what parents/student can bear. It is just crazy to make people sacrifice their financial future for the sake of getting their child the best education they can. Because, they know people will, and their costs will never, ever go down, but will only go up, and are passed onto parents who want the best for their offspring.


24 posted on 04/19/2011 9:41:12 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: RobRoy

What kind of engineering is she in?

My husband is a manufacturing engineer who just started working for his current employer 5.5 months ago. The company had to go outside the state to find someone qualified enough to take the job they were offering (the plant’s in Ohio, and we’re in Arkansas). My husband knows of other engineers from his last employer who put in for the Ohio job who had more education and seniority (my husband doesn’t even have a Bachelor’s in Engineering—just his Associate’s, but has several years in the field—call it on-the-job training, I guess, LOL).

In the end, it was my husband’s actual accomplishments that landed him where he is now and not the degree. That being said, I’m going to be on him like white on rice when the kids and I move to Ohio to get that stinking Bachelor’s finished—he only has about a couple of semester left.


25 posted on 04/19/2011 9:45:11 AM PDT by Hoosier Catholic Momma (Change everything you are, everything you were, your number has been called.)
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To: Lysandru

“Colleges charge more because the government makes sure the money will be paid.”

That’s all the whole thing in a nutshell.

Nowadays though, people have educational alternatives - lots of education available online to get your ticket to the Middle Class. As one of my professors told me years ago, today’s university is an institution straight out of the Middle Ages, but that is changing.


26 posted on 04/19/2011 9:45:56 AM PDT by bopdowah ("Unlike King Midas, whatever the Gubmint touches sure don't turn to Gold!')
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To: Hoosier Catholic Momma

I think his experience is the key. I have no college and have no problem getting a job (well, for the most part). I’m 57 now and I think my age may be starting to become a factor. That is easily resolved by contracting. Companies may not want to hire old experienced guys, for fear it will not pay off in the end, but when it comes to contracting, old experienced guys actually have an advantage.

She’s in structural engineering, specializing in steel and concrete. She also was the lead singer/guitar/fiddle in my band last year. :)


27 posted on 04/19/2011 9:50:40 AM PDT by RobRoy (The US today: Revelation 18:4)
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To: SeekAndFind
There are many questionable attributes of an expensive college education:

1)The physics and math courses at our local community college are far more instructive than my past ones at an elite private university, e.g. they are taught by industrial practitioners and designers who genuinely know the day to day applications of say angular momentum or rotational energy or heat capacity.

2)As an instructor, the textbook pushing business is obscene. One hundred plus dollars for an elementary calculus text for a subject that hasn't changed for two hundred years. A perfect example of the article's reference to third party or government funding inflating costs.

3)A good company or apprentice technical pathway can be many times more efficient, productive, and beneficial than a formal campus matriculation. Any insightful employer knows, and experiences, that a credential can be as phony as an applicant.

4)Liberal rounding background (in the academic sense) can always be obtained through night programs.

5)However the sequestration of a campus for drinking, partying, and idealizing, is tough to repudiate for the hormonal set; as many of us know from experience.

Johnny Suntrade

28 posted on 04/19/2011 9:51:55 AM PDT by jnsun (The Left: the need to manipulate others because of nothing productive to offer.)
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To: Prokopton

What is the major? $182K for most degrees isn’t a wise investment.


29 posted on 04/19/2011 9:52:59 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: myrabach

I believe that the problem we have today is that when the government gives the people something, it’s tough to take it away and the politicians won’t because they are looking for votes. This is what we have to change..........some how.


30 posted on 04/19/2011 9:54:02 AM PDT by RC2
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To: SeekAndFind

in the 1950’s academicians were paid low salaries.

also, the communists feared losing their jobs because of what they called “mccarthism”.

tenure was devised to protect themselves.

the new left boomer generation in the 1960’s gained control of university faculties

and larded their salaries.

meanwhile, in the 1990’s universities reduced the teaching load of faculty from 3 courses to 2,

thus, increasing the number of faculty needed.


31 posted on 04/19/2011 9:55:30 AM PDT by ken21 (dem taxes + regs + unions = jobs overseas.)
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To: rlmorel

Thomas Sowell summed it up perfectly with a great quote of his that read a while back. He pointed out that liberals will always tend to work in “industries” where the quality of the “product” has no bearing on the success of the industry — which is why they tend to dominate academia and journalism, for example.


32 posted on 04/19/2011 9:55:50 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: IamConservative

It’s a racket to many!
“Government-guaranteed loans and grants distort the true cost of education.”

In the Eighties, I attended Control Data’s computer tech school. I paid at the beginning of every Quarter, CD didn’t like that at all, because the government wasn’t guaranteeing a loan for me. Mostly it was minority students taking the loans. They clock in in the morning, then split to hang out all day. Then they’d come back, late afternoon, and clock out. But they attended every other Tuesday, cuz that’s when the CETA gal came to pay them for their non-existing attendance. Control Data didn’t care! They got their money!
So,,, we taxpayers guaranteed their loans, and paid them a salary. What a racket! And then I got screwed out of the job at NASA because they needed to hire a Black female!


33 posted on 04/19/2011 9:57:48 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: bopdowah

So Dems constantly grow Government, raise taxes to support the Union and Acemdemia Classes all the while throttling the life out of the Evil rich and private industry and then the brainwashed grads cant find a job and join the ranks of non-working government bennies addicts that are given free housing.

Sounds like a plan.

Anybody heard of Savoy Brown’s “Hellbound Train”?

Thats what we are on but this madness will end one way or another, may be really ugly.


34 posted on 04/19/2011 10:00:58 AM PDT by Gasshog (going to get what all those libs asked for, but its not what they expected.)
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To: IamConservative

Wonder when we’ll hear Dems moan about price gouging from “Big Education” ??

3rd party payer systems screw up everything.this is just another example, healthcare being the prime example.


35 posted on 04/19/2011 10:02:12 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB ( "I don't want the majority if we don't stand for something"- Jim Demint)
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To: redgolum
$182K for most degrees isn’t a wise investment

It's hard to tell, but Payscale has Notre Dame ranked ninth for return on investment.

36 posted on 04/19/2011 10:03:28 AM PDT by Prokopton
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To: SeekAndFind

Whenever I see a new program to “enhance” the education at colleges, I turn to my daughter and say, “If you are running a college and the government just told parents they will get $2,000 in a tax credit, what is the first thing you do?”

After a while, she got it. Not she would respond with, “raise the tuition $2,100. $2000 for the tax credit, and $100 because you can get away with it.”

Good girl....


37 posted on 04/19/2011 10:05:30 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (How long before the Mall becomes Tahifir Sq?)
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To: SeekAndFind

Whenever I see a new program to “enhance” the education at colleges, I turn to my daughter and say, “If you are running a college and the government just told parents they will get $2,000 in a tax credit, what is the first thing you do?”

After a while, she got it. Now she would respond with, “raise the tuition $2,100. $2000 for the tax credit, and $100 because you can get away with it.”

Good girl....


38 posted on 04/19/2011 10:05:50 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (How long before the Mall becomes Tahifir Sq?)
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To: Vermont Lt

Yuor daughter could be the administrator of a college.


39 posted on 04/19/2011 10:09:28 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: Prokopton
Would he want to go to Notre Dame if he had to pay for it himself? That's really the underlying lesson to be learned here, no?

When I was in high school I was accepted to a top engineering school, and I actually had an alumnus of the school steer me away from it. His rationale was purely financial. He said: "For what it will cost you to get an undergraduate degree from this school, you could go to a state school for your undergraduate degree and follow it up with a master's program at MIT or Stanford."

I took his advice on the undergraduate part, but didn't follow up with the MIT/Stanford part. LOL.

40 posted on 04/19/2011 10:12:42 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: SeekAndFind

One of my sons attended ERAU back in the early 90’s. Tuition was $13000 a year. This is what it would cost now. Obviously now it would be out of our reach.

Estimated Costs Undergraduate Students Item Cost
Tuition and Fees* $29,248
Room and Board $8,790
Books (estimated) $1,400
Total, non-flight students** $39,438


41 posted on 04/19/2011 10:21:00 AM PDT by heylady
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To: SeekAndFind
There is no rule in life that says you must go to Harvard or Yale to be successful in life.

The main advantage of attending an Ivy League college is the opportunity for quality networking.

42 posted on 04/19/2011 10:21:23 AM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Shemp was the Fourth Stooge of the Apocalypse.)
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To: SeekAndFind

She has actually maneuvered herself around the college application process to where she is able to attend the best school for her major, and has gotten scholarships and non federal funding so that she only has to foot about $5k of the $33k bill.

Smart kid. Much smarter than I.


43 posted on 04/19/2011 10:23:20 AM PDT by Vermont Lt (How long before the Mall becomes Tahifir Sq?)
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To: EyeGuy
a nice little safe cocoon for heinously unproductive, overpaid and often talentless academics.

Well said. You forgot to mention that many of them are Marxist ideologues whose main interest is the political and sexual indoctrination of students, not teaching core subjects.

Since the 1960s most colleges and universities have been politically radicalized on the public dollar. Any parent who sends a son or daughter off to college these days without knowing a lot about what and how the school teaches risks sending their child into a damaging environment.

44 posted on 04/19/2011 10:26:01 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: heylady

RE: One of my sons attended ERAU back in the early 90’s

Pilots are paid very well. One year’s salary could pretty much pay off the tuition by my estimation.


45 posted on 04/19/2011 10:27:54 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

If you want a higer education pay for it yourself period.


46 posted on 04/19/2011 10:47:51 AM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: jnsun

You are absolutely right. The textbook scam goes like this: students pay hundreds of dollars for a textbook. About four or five semesters later, the textbook publishers offer a “new” addition, which is commonly the same old edition with the cover and a few pages changed and maybe a few other minor changes. That way, the textbook publishers can charge the students for new instead of used books. If is an endless cycle.It is not uncommon for a student to pay $500-800 a semester just for books.


47 posted on 04/19/2011 10:56:05 AM PDT by NotTallTex
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To: EyeGuy
It is a bubble that has been LONG overdue for some SERIOUS bursting.

Amen!

48 posted on 04/19/2011 11:06:16 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: SeekAndFind

The cost of higher education is inflated.

The estimated preparedness of incoming Freshmen, and their appropriateness for college is inflated.

The grades are inflated.

The self-assessment of the knowledge of graduating students is inflated.

The whole process has become a joke.


49 posted on 04/19/2011 11:09:04 AM PDT by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
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To: Alberta's Child

Ah. Thomas Sowell...one of my “heroes” (see my freep page...:)

Should be: The GREAT Thomas Sowell.


50 posted on 04/19/2011 12:26:48 PM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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