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Grandma dropped in Arctic in botched rescue dies
MSNBC ^ | April 24th 2011 | MSNVC/AP

Posted on 04/24/2011 3:15:35 AM PDT by Cardhu

LONDON — A 73-year-old grandmother who was dropped into freezing Arctic waters during botched rescue attempt has died, British media reported Saturday.

Janet Richardson died Saturday at Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle, England, The Daily Mail reported. Her 78-year-old husband, George Richardson, was by her side at the time of her death.

Richardson had been fighting for her life in the British hospital after rescuers dropped her into freezing Arctic waters as they attempted to transfer her from a cruise ship to a lifeboat.

Richardson reportedly began to feel dizzy and ill on the Ocean Countess cruise along the coast of Norway last month. After she was examined by the ship's doctor the captain decided to transfer her to shore for treatment.

Another passenger on the ship, Colin Prescott, said both the ship and the lifeboat "were steaming at ten knots" when paramedics tried to move her on a stretcher, The Sun newspaper reported.

"The vessels, which hadn't been latched together, suddenly moved apart by several feet as they were transferring her, which caused the rescue crews to drop the stretcher into the sea," Prescott said.

George Richardson looked on in horror.

"Six men were holding the stretcher, but it went down and then Janet slipped into the sea. She was conscious throughout," he told The Sun.

British media reported that the water was -3 degrees Celsius (26.6 degrees Fahrenheit) and that it took paramedics around 8 minutes to rescue her from the frigid waters.

Colin Prescott / Patrick Hill Image: Janet Richardson, 73, is transferred to a rescue boat after being taken ill on board the Ocean Countess ship. "It was very traumatic to see her fall in," her husband said. "I thought I was going to lose her."

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.msn.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 73yowoman; arctic
"Janet had always wanted to go on a cruise to the Norwegian Fjords so she could see the Northern Lights," her husband said. The couple share eight grandchildren between them through previous marriages."

[snip]

"Larsen said it wasn't unusual for ships to be used in rescue operations instead of helicopters and said people are safely transferred between ships in Norway every day."

1 posted on 04/24/2011 3:15:42 AM PDT by Cardhu
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To: Cardhu

That will teach you not to be pining for no fjords.


2 posted on 04/24/2011 3:27:23 AM PDT by billorites (freepo ergo sum)
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To: Cardhu

One of the men was heard saying, “You’re going to have to swim the rest of the way”.


3 posted on 04/24/2011 3:35:28 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: All

another way to look at it, God was calling her home and those men got in the way


4 posted on 04/24/2011 3:37:10 AM PDT by SF_Redux (Sarah stands for accountablility and personal responsiblity, democrats can't live with that)
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To: billorites

I would hate to be the cox’n of that lifeboat as the ships moved apart.

Guess who is to blame for that.


5 posted on 04/24/2011 3:37:49 AM PDT by Cardhu
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To: count-your-change

When I was in the Arctic, testing survival gear, they used to tell us that one would only last 3 minutes unprotected in the icy waters.

This old lady lasted 8 minutes - for a while at least.


6 posted on 04/24/2011 3:43:51 AM PDT by Cardhu
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To: Cardhu

I’m sure everyone involved was horrified. Poor guy lost his wife and the rescuers have to live the rest of their lives with this haunting them. I hope they can all find some peace.


7 posted on 04/24/2011 4:00:43 AM PDT by Nickname
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To: Cardhu
I would hate to be the cox’n of that lifeboat as the ships moved apart. Guess who is to blame for that.

If the boats had been tethered together there was every bit as much chance of the smaller boat capsizing. At sea transfers are risky at 10 knots more so because of too many uncontrollable factors. I wasn't a Coxun but I worked boat crew { as engineman} on 50' UB's and 35' PB's for the ship while deployed when we entered ports. I about bought the farm once from a swell when we were tied to a deck house and the ship anchored.

This was one of the reasons when that cruise ship went D.I,W. last year off Cali/Mexico coast they had the passenger stay put while it was towed. There is no such critter as a risk free at sea rescue.

8 posted on 04/24/2011 4:02:56 AM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: Cardhu

I would think if she was strapped onto the stretcher securely, that she would have drowned and that not being strapped to it gave her a chance?
It just seems like it took way too long for them to rescue her.


9 posted on 04/24/2011 4:13:48 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: nuconvert

Good pics at the MSNBC site. The poor lady is lucky she survived the drop and was not pulled through the props of one of the vessels as the rescuers cling to the lifelines. They were definitely steaming too fast, look at the wake in the pic....I see a long trail of Law-lie-yers in the near future for all involved.


10 posted on 04/24/2011 4:25:02 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: Cardhu

Anytime, peace or war, rough water or calm, moving people between two boats on the water is never a sure thing.

I remember one time, coming back from liberty, as the liberty launch full of drunk sailors pulled up to the stern of the carrier, the water was rough enough that the platform attached to the stern of the ship was rising and falling, while independently of that, the liberty launch was rising and falling at a different rate.

The result was, the boat and the deck were sometimes as far as six feet away from each other, and were swinging wildly past each other. We had to time it, so that as the two rushed past each other, they would occasionally pause for a second or two nearly even, and two or three drunk guys would leap over before it began oscillating again.

There were a few instances where people leaped badly or stumbled and either ended up in a heap on the other side, or had people grabbing them to pull them all the way over. People all doing this while completely intoxicated. To this day, I am not only amazed they were trying to get people aboard in this fashion, but also that nobody was seriously hurt or crushed between the vessels.

I also read about the battle for Iwo Jima, where they had a large pallet with 24 wounded Marines in litters on it, and they were hoisting it onto a ship. The hoist gave way, and all the men went into the water. None were recovered.


11 posted on 04/24/2011 4:31:03 AM PDT by rlmorel (Capitalism is the Goose that lays The Golden Egg.)
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To: Cardhu
Say hello to the new owner of the cruise ship:
GrandPa. . . . . .
12 posted on 04/24/2011 4:36:14 AM PDT by DeaconRed (TAGLINE: I can't come up with a good one, so I'll revert to my old standby - FUBO)
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To: Cardhu

RIP.


13 posted on 04/24/2011 4:36:46 AM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Amber Lamps !"~~)
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To: iopscusa; Cardhu

“Richardson had suffered from internal bleeding during the homeward leg of a two-week cruise “

Meaning she had an ulcer? I don’t understand why they thought sending a boat instead of a helicopter was going to get her the medical attention she needed fast enough?


14 posted on 04/24/2011 4:42:25 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: Cardhu

I have two thoughts, OUCH (having been in 30 degree water for 10 seconds myself)(and glad it wasn’t 8 minutes). Two, were they really in such a hurry that they couldn’t have just STOPPED to transfer her or would that have had it’s own dangers? (i.e. giving directional control over the ship to the sea). I’m from the Air Force family and don’t know my Aft from Stern, so enlighten me.


15 posted on 04/24/2011 4:51:03 AM PDT by politicalmerc (The whole earth may move, but God's throne is never shaken. I think I'll stand by Him..)
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To: nuconvert

If the ship waa in the Norwegian Fjords it is very close to land so a boat would get her to hospital in a very short time.


16 posted on 04/24/2011 5:13:50 AM PDT by Cardhu
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To: Cardhu

Put a line on the patient and lower her? Or at least have a line on her? It’s a wonder she wasn’t sucked into the screws.


17 posted on 04/24/2011 5:13:50 AM PDT by TalBlack ( Evil doesn't have a day job.)
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To: nuconvert
It just seems like it took way too long for them to rescue her.

In water at 26.6 degrees, it might take longer than that to convince me to go in after her.

18 posted on 04/24/2011 5:21:13 AM PDT by Graybeard58 (Be the kind of man that when you get up in the morning, the devil says, "Oh crap, he's UP !!)
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To: Cardhu

ok. thanx


19 posted on 04/24/2011 5:29:05 AM PDT by nuconvert ( Khomeini promised change too // Hail, Chairman O)
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To: nuconvert
I don’t understand why they thought sending a boat instead of a helicopter was going to get her the medical attention she needed fast enough?

The NHS refused to pay for it? That'd be my guess.

20 posted on 04/24/2011 5:42:10 AM PDT by mewzilla (Were members of both political parties in on the Lockerbie bomber deal?)
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To: mewzilla
I was curious, so I'll just throw this in. From 2009. Interesting stats.

Lives Saved by Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: An Overview of Literature

21 posted on 04/24/2011 5:47:54 AM PDT by mewzilla (Were members of both political parties in on the Lockerbie bomber deal?)
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To: Cardhu
I've heard various times, 7 to 13 minutes for a pilot going down. The Nazis used Jewish prisoners in barrels of ice water to “research” the question.
I expect for the granny it was the end of the line no matter how short the time. The shock, the lowered body temp., all over with by the time she's warmed up again.
22 posted on 04/24/2011 6:14:42 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: Cardhu
How long you will last in Arctic water depends a lot on your genetic baggage ~ a square heart helps, plus you want to make sure your system doesn't shut down blood flow to your arms and legs instantly.

It's good if your body is set up to INCREASE metabolic rates rather than to DECREASE them.

Even Tropical people can survive for a good 20 minutes. The record in the Far North for someone with the correct baggage is 6.5 hours! She's a med tech in a Norwegian hospital.

The lady was older and sick. She may well have been in the early stages of death anyway. The record shows she could have survived much longer than 8 minutes.

23 posted on 04/24/2011 6:45:37 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Nickname

I hope they can all find some peace.

***
Prayers up for all involved.


24 posted on 04/24/2011 6:50:08 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
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To: muawiyah

square heart ??


25 posted on 04/24/2011 6:55:06 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
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To: rlmorel

Tragic, tso think you’ve survived hell only to drown strapped to a pallet. Pure horror I suspect before the great reward, Thanks to Jesus.


26 posted on 04/24/2011 7:12:11 AM PDT by mcshot (The GREATEST GENERATION would not tolerate this bastardization of our Republic.)
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To: Bigg Red
A "square heart" is simply one where all four chambers are of roughly equal size ~ you can inherit the condition (very common in the Far North among the Polar Peoples) or you can engage in very long term heavy exercise ~ running marathons is a good way to find out.

The "square heart" pumps more blood faster to the lungs, and also adds to the general strength of the heart thereby improving flow to the arms, legs, etc.

It gives you a decided advantage in Cross Country Skiing.

27 posted on 04/24/2011 7:23:09 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Bigg Red

Look for “athletic heart” ~


28 posted on 04/24/2011 7:26:56 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: iopscusa
They were definitely steaming too fast, look at the wake in the pic

That movement and speed was required for stability. Stop the boat and ship and both will pitch and roll a lot worse. Moving lessens it somewhat but not entirely. Believe it or not the one ship you do not want to be on is a dead in the water {stopped} ship or boat on high seas.

29 posted on 04/24/2011 11:52:55 AM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: rlmorel
Anytime, peace or war, rough water or calm, moving people between two boats on the water is never a sure thing. I remember one time, coming back from liberty, as the liberty launch full of drunk sailors pulled up to the stern of the carrier, the water was rough enough that the platform attached to the stern of the ship was rising and falling, while independently of that, the liberty launch was rising and falling at a different rate.

The result was, the boat and the deck were sometimes as far as six feet away from each other, and were swinging wildly past each other. We had to time it, so that as the two rushed past each other, they would occasionally pause for a second or two nearly even, and two or three drunk guys would leap over before it began oscillating again.

There were a few instances where people leaped badly or stumbled and either ended up in a heap on the other side, or had people grabbing them to pull them all the way over. People all doing this while completely intoxicated. To this day, I am not only amazed they were trying to get people aboard in this fashion, but also that nobody was seriously hurt or crushed between the vessels.

We were on A MED Cruise in 79. I'd been on boat duty for 24 hours and was fixing to get relieved. We went to Deck House one {quarterdeck} to pick up a load of officers and my relief was to meet me there. I was working on a PB crew. I decided to lay against the windshield while waiting. Big Mistake. Seas were calm but a swell caught the boat. I heard someone yell my first name and Jump so I looked up and dove into the deck just as the windshield was busted by the deck house ladder. I got back to the states a few months later and my dad asked if I had a close call one night. He said my mom woke up yelling Jump.

I did the boat crew a cruise and a half till I got my Crow. All A-Division Snipes E-3 and below were sent T.A.D. boat crew in port on deployments. The liberty boats were ran by two deckapes and a snipe plus after dusk till morning a boat officer.

I know what you mean about getting from boat to deck house platform. I missed once myself and went between the barrel and platform. I was lucky the Coxun saw it happen and kept the boat off me till I got out. The only thing harder is trying to get on a boat from a Jacobs Ladder from a boat boom. On a carrier the boat booms are level with the hanger deck. When we weren't making runs we tied off to a boom and used the Jacobs Ladder to get on and off the boat onto the ship. That usually required leaving one man on the boat so he could drive the boat under the guy coming down. I about got my skull cracked a couple of times trying to get from the Jacobs Ladder onto the boat. Swells are not fun.

It seems the media in this article is trying a blame game for circumstances they know little about. No one wanted to drop the woman but there are too many uncontrollable factors in an at sea transfer even under best of seas.

I've seen wire mesh stretchers used for transferring drunk and disorderly sailors from Liberty Launch to ship. We would put a life jacket on them, tie them in, then place another stretcher on top forming a restraining cage of sorts. We then tied a couple of life jackets to the cage as well. Drunk could not hurt you during transit was the goal. Getting them from the boat onto deck house platform was a P.I.T.A. The sailor for causing such a ride always won a free visit to see the Old Man and usually lost liberty the duration of the cruise, a rank, and some pay.

The one thing I hated with a deep passion was being first on duty when we hit port. That meant I had to launch the boat. Instead of simply climbing on the boat while still on the ship the ships Bosun always made us jump from the aircraft elevator onto the boat. That meant trying to climb out of the wire safety net on the elevator and jumping onto the boat. Then the crane would lower us on down to the water. It was a dangerous manuver.

30 posted on 04/24/2011 12:25:43 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: cva66snipe

Passing a stretcher through the door to the boat requires a lot of skill on the part of the boat operator. It’s always easy to second guess the guys on scene, but I wonder if lowering the stretcher from a j-bar davit wouldn’t have been a better idea. From the pics I’ve seen this isn’t one of those monster cruise ships with a 100 ft freeboard.


31 posted on 04/24/2011 2:43:49 PM PDT by GATOR NAVY ("The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen." -Dennis Prager)
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To: GATOR NAVY
Passing a stretcher through the door to the boat requires a lot of skill on the part of the boat operator. It’s always easy to second guess the guys on scene, but I wonder if lowering the stretcher from a j-bar davit wouldn’t have been a better idea. From the pics I’ve seen this isn’t one of those monster cruise ships with a 100 ft freeboard.

Even a refueling at sea or a VERT REP can go bad real fast. That's why they practiced Emergency Break Away on the lines but there you just drop the lines and move off. This type of operation did not allow for that nor could it do so practically without dropping the stretcher. My guess is they figured she had the best chance not tied in because the life jacket would right her head and body position if they lost control.

That area they were in is in very unforgiving seas. The closer the transport boat was to the ship the greater the danger to the boat.

Rescues happen every day at sea. Most go good despite all things going wrong. People go to sea and some will die in accidents. That applies to Navy, Merchant Marines, and even cruise ships.

For that matter hitting port real fast would have been the safest thing. A transfer behind a sea wall is much calmer seas. A pier even more so.

I'm just guessing that hand to hand they had more control when they started and determined how to attempt it. With a line it would be as unpredictable. In a matter of a couple seconds she could be 5 ft above the deck of the rescue boat or her hanging 3 ft below the bow with the boat moving downward toward her. Any way they could have rigged it was not fail safe.

32 posted on 04/24/2011 4:12:59 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: muawiyah

Okay, thank you for the info.

I always learn so much on FR.


33 posted on 04/24/2011 5:36:30 PM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
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To: Bigg Red
Here ~ one more thing on those square hearts, they are (as noted) associated with Bradycardia ~ a type of arrhythmia in the upper Atrial chamber.

That, by itself, is frequently associated with an extra sinus ~ or nerve nexus that fires an electrical charge that makes the heart beat.

So, with a square heart, enlarged Atrial chambers, and an extra sinus you can end up with arrhythmia so severe that you are almost an invalid and will usually not get enough sleep time.

Fortunately modern science has given us a solution ~ a simple procedure where they insert a tube up through your groin into your heart. Another tube is inserted into your main artery and down to about the same spot. The physicians then send an electrical charge into the extra sinus and ablate it (which means to coagulate the cells). That ends the problem. They pull out the equipment. Put a bandage on your crotch, and you go home about 2 hours after you arrived, Cured!

One of the symptoms of having this condition involves an inability to get your heart pumping more than about 120 beats per minute except when it's involved in one of it's spells of arrhythmia.

You'll be pumping along doing what you want and your heart is chucking faster and faster and it hits 120, then it starts slowing down ~ usually as low as 40 beats per minute.

Now that's some serious stuff. On the other hand each beat is much more powerful than it normally would since the atrial chambers are actually helping to move blood through the body, and you are sucking in more oxygen since there's more blood being pushed through the lungs faster.

Been thinking about this one for many years. It has something to do with being able to get dunked in cold Arctic waters and survive ~ and to live around glaciers all the time ~ and survive that.

Remember, if you just move more air in and out of your lungs, you may get a bit more oxygen but at the same time you'll dry out your bronchial tubes and mouth. You'll lose a lot of heat too. So, if you can extract just a little bit more oxygen from the blood, and more efficiently move more CO2 into the air in the lungs on each breath, that more powerful heart can be your friend. Instead of moving air past the blood, you move the blood past the air, reduce your breathing rate, retain more body heat, and ski uphill with ease!

Much of a bird's breathing apparatus does exactly this ~ finding something similar in humans shouldn't be a surprise.

34 posted on 04/24/2011 6:42:33 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Cardhu

I’m sure it will be easy for those who have never rescued a single person in their lives to second guess these rescuers.

May God be with grandma and all involved.


35 posted on 04/24/2011 6:49:16 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: muawiyah

...of moving air past the blood, you move the blood past the air...

***
Amazing.

So this square heart is found more frequently among groups indigenous to regions above the arctic circle?

This is fascinating stuff. Thanks again for the free education. :)


36 posted on 04/25/2011 9:06:20 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Palin in 2012)
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