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To: Garvin

I’m having a debate with someone on this topic right now. Help me explain the “OR” part of the phrase below. I see that as probematic if I quote it to them to debate:

“No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States”

Is it an ‘either/or’ situation or an ‘and’ qualifier or just some legalize phrasing that means both?


25 posted on 04/25/2011 5:38:17 AM PDT by Ikaros
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To: Ikaros
“No person except a natural born Citizen, or a Citizen of the United States”

Is it an ‘either/or’ situation or an ‘and’ qualifier or just some legalize phrasing that means both?


The main problem above is that you truncated the quote which would have easily answered your question.

Here's the rest: "at the time of the Adoption of this Constitution"

There are two groups here that, at the time of the adoption of the Constitution, were eligible for the presidency: 1. natural born Citizens, 2. those who, though not "natural born," were citizens at the time of the adoption of the Constitution. The second category no longer exists, unless you can find someone that is over 224 years old.
26 posted on 04/25/2011 5:46:42 AM PDT by aruanan
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