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To: driftdiver

Other flight crews in similar Airbus ships with the same failures DID recover from the condition. ALL involved loss of altitude, IIRC. this is not the first time it happened.

For whatever reasons, this crew did/could not recover the aircraft, likely from some sort of a stall condition with very limited attitude information available to them.

Again, I fly small, single engine slow-movers with that spinning thing out front. IT is VERY hard to lose control of a Champ, a Tri-Pacer, or a 152, or a 172, or a Rocket, etc etc


17 posted on 05/23/2011 7:04:52 AM PDT by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur)
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To: Blueflag
I think if it were day time and the pilots could see the ocean surface below, they may have been able to recover from the stall.
19 posted on 05/23/2011 7:09:51 AM PDT by libh8er
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To: Blueflag

Those planes you fly don’t have a fancy dancy computer flying the plane for you.


23 posted on 05/23/2011 7:15:15 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Blueflag
IT is VERY hard to lose control of a Champ, a Tri-Pacer, or a 152, or a 172, or a Rocket, etc etc.

I understand what you are saying; we own a Cherokee which I would argue is probably easier to fly than any of the other planes you just mentioned. But, actually it has been proved repeatedly by scores of pilots that it is fairly easy to lose control of almost any aircraft. All you have to do is pull the yolk all the way back and apply full rudder.

You can't do that in a stock “spin proof” Ercoupe since they don't have rudder pedals, but you can still fly it into a cloud ... get disoriented and inadvertently point the nose toward terra-firma.

I live on an airpark (a small airport with houses built around it). I personally have known several “pilots” over the years who have managed to permanently escape the limitations of this imperfect physical world. In most cases all it took was just a small amount of overconfidence in their aircraft or their abilities. I have shared similar personality traits so but for the grace of God go I. I like to think that most of them are still experiencing the joys of flight in a place where the laws of gravity and aerodynamics no longer can cause an abrupt end to what should have been another fun day of flying.

I remember when I was first getting into hang gliding; I had explained to my skeptical new bride how safe it really was. I thought it would be a good idea to take her to the Cloud Base Country Club monthly meeting to introduce her to some fellow pilots. Unfortunately it had been a turbulent spring. The Shakeys Pizza Parlor felt like eerily similar to a hospital ward from a Marx Brothers movie. It seemed like every other person was being wheeled in with one limb or another in some sort of traction. She is very courageous... so I still managed to get her 5000 feet over launch under a tandem hang glider.

Fortunately for me since that time my wife has been my constant flying companion. She brings up the Pizza Parlor when I start making risky decisions. I can't help but wonder if she couldn't have helped the crew of the ill fated Airbus. I suspect that the sequence of events leading to the incident started much earlier than when the captain had to leave the cockpit for a potty break.

47 posted on 05/23/2011 8:42:20 AM PDT by fireman15 (Check your facts before making ignorant statements.)
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To: Blueflag

“Previous experience” doesn’t, unfortuantly, neccessarily mean its applicable to the extant scenario. Too many variables. That AF447 entered a “deep stall condition” is obvious from the data gleaned. But it leaves unanswered the particulars of the aircraft’s CG at the time of the accident vs those “successful recoveries”. Lets hope the recovery of the flight data and CP units resolves this.

Progress in aviation has always been earned in blood. >PS


88 posted on 05/23/2011 4:13:41 PM PDT by PiperShade
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To: Blueflag

Four minutes sounds a bit short for a glide duration from 35000’.


109 posted on 05/28/2011 2:24:55 PM PDT by Justa
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