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Aerial View of Missouri River flooding (ND)
flickr ^ | 5.29-11 | Bill Prokopyk

Posted on 06/02/2011 9:18:28 PM PDT by WOBBLY BOB

Aerial view of the Missouri River from a North Dakota National Guard Black Hawk helicopter in the vicinity of Bismarck and Mandan, N.D., on May 29, 2011. When these photos were taken, the river was at about 15.74 feet with a garrison release flow of 80,000 cubic feet per second.

(Excerpt) Read more at flickr.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: North Dakota
KEYWORDS: bismarck; fargo; flood; flooding; mandan; missouri; nd; river

1 posted on 06/02/2011 9:18:34 PM PDT by WOBBLY BOB
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To: WOBBLY BOB

My wife’s family is in the thick of that flooding.


2 posted on 06/02/2011 9:21:15 PM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier currently deployed in the Valley of Death, Afghanistan)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

It’s even worse in Montana.


3 posted on 06/02/2011 9:21:59 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (You have entered an invalid birthday)
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To: SoldierDad

How’s their house?


4 posted on 06/02/2011 9:26:40 PM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

If they could they can send all that they want to to SE Texas because it is drier than a popcorn fnart down here. Driest I have seen it in 25 years.

Amazing, almost everything looks new or near new in those photos. Must have singled out an area because I don’t recall it being that prosperous up there. Ethanol must be great for farming.


5 posted on 06/02/2011 9:27:02 PM PDT by Sequoyah101 (Half the people are below average.)
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To: Sequoyah101

Ethanol nothing, there’s an oil boom on up here. (Bakken, Three Forks). (Grain prices are way up, too.) People are either leasing their minerals and/or getting royalties, working in the patch or in any service sector job, etc. For now, anyway, things are good (Thank God).


6 posted on 06/02/2011 9:40:48 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Sequoyah101

Ethanol must be great for farming.

You should take that back.


7 posted on 06/02/2011 9:42:17 PM PDT by DManA
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To: WOBBLY BOB

When I was young the Missouri River flooded from far north and south at least to Kansas City. We had a huge stock yard with thousands of cattle that had been brought to market. Everything in the bottoms was under water. Even though it was at least 60 years ago I will never forget the sight of so much water everywhere and the cries of the stranded cattle.


8 posted on 06/02/2011 9:43:23 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: Smokin' Joe

They are calling for a crest down here (KS/Mo) around 6/12 shy of the ‘93 flood. Depends what blows out north of her on the Missouri. Lots of bottom ground already messed up/late. Grain prices will only go up.


9 posted on 06/02/2011 9:47:55 PM PDT by One Name
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To: BigSkyFreeper

The Missouri is basically bluff to bluff south of Williston where US 85 goes across to McKenzie County (about 10 miles east of the confluence with the Yellowstone). The roadbed is a couple of feet out of the water, but all the fishing access sites and boat ramps are well under water.

Over on 1804, East of Williston, if you look south at the railroad bridge, the water level is at the bottom of the bridge (Little Muddy). Highest I’ve seen either in most of thirty years, and all headed south.

Water levels have dropped about 4 inches in the past week, just judging from the signs poking out of the water.


10 posted on 06/02/2011 9:49:34 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: bgill

Her family lives in Minot. There are several family members who had to evacuate from their several homes that are in the flooding area. I haven’t yet heard how bad the damage is. My wife’s parent’s home is not in the flooded area, and her sister has moved her children into this house (my wife’s mother died this past Winter, and her father died in 2009).


11 posted on 06/02/2011 9:51:10 PM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier currently deployed in the Valley of Death, Afghanistan)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

12 posted on 06/02/2011 9:52:33 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: One Name

See post 10.

I agree about grain prices, the fields are generally too wet to sow, even where they aren’t under water.

Heavy snowpack and a late blizzard hurt here, and the bottoms are still inundated.

There is some talk of seeding from the air, but any more rain will make a mess of that and its expensive as all get-out, too. Better buy your grains now, if you can and have a dry place to keep them.


13 posted on 06/02/2011 9:52:47 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

The Missouri is a really big mud puddle on the move.


14 posted on 06/02/2011 10:03:36 PM PDT by lurk
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To: Smokin' Joe

River bottoms all got planted here already, barely. Wet and cool spring. The outfits that do the big bottoms get in there with Challengers,etc. and get their stuff done while the smaller guys on hill ground are waiting for dry weather.

Still some hill ground beans to be planted and now some creek bottom fields will have to be replanted.

And the Missouri ain’t out down here yet.


15 posted on 06/02/2011 10:07:23 PM PDT by One Name
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To: One Name
Sugar beets and corn in the bottoms here, mostly--not in. Upland farming is mostly wheat, durum, sunflowers, 'canola', and a few other crops besides hay.

If the bottoms had been planted early, they'd have drowned, but we've had so much snow this year in the area (all time record for the winter), not much is in up hill either.

16 posted on 06/02/2011 10:18:01 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Smokin' Joe
If the bottoms had been planted early, they'd have drowned,

They'll probably end up getting replanted next year.  The sugarbeet crops around Sidney are usually in the ground after the last thaw.  Even the Canadians across the border in Saskatchewan along the Souris River have decided to skip planting this year and worry about it next year. 

17 posted on 06/02/2011 10:29:10 PM PDT by BigSkyFreeper (You have entered an invalid birthday)
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To: SoldierDad

My kids live just outside of Towner. They must be on a little rise, because they are about to become an island. Hwy 2 has been closed, with water over the bridge, near Minot, I understand.


18 posted on 06/02/2011 10:41:45 PM PDT by redhead (Get the &%@*$ Government OUT of our BUSINESS!)
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To: BigSkyFreeper

I’m not sure how much that will affect sugar markets, outside of the local areas, but the guys who drive truck for the beet harvest are likely working in the oil patch anyway right now.


19 posted on 06/02/2011 10:47:05 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Sequoyah101

Ethanol farmers drive new trucks and Corvettes. I know some.


20 posted on 06/02/2011 11:11:41 PM PDT by Uncle Miltie (0bamas PLAN is national bankruptcy. Our plan is to save Medicare and Social Security with reforms.)
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To: Sequoyah101

Shows how well informed you are. North Dakota is the most prosperous State right now because of OIL that is being developed over there. I hope this flood doesn’t destroy those oil fields. Besides all the farmland in the West...8 times the average snowfall here in Montana which hasn’t even started to melt yet, but when it does, the Missouri River will carry it...No crops this summer much of anywhere. And lots of flyover country Americans out of their homes. Where I am in the middle of Montana there have already been huge floods and I may be the only one in my neighborhood who hasn’t suffered water damage yet. We don’t know if we can get groceries here next week because all the roads are washed out. Look up ROUNDUP, MT and Lewistown MT flooding to see what is happening here already.


21 posted on 06/02/2011 11:14:05 PM PDT by tinamina
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To: Sequoyah101

http://www.lewistownnews.com/articles/2011/06/02/news/doc4de6bc50e3b15973891666.txt

This is wheat and cow country, no ethanol here, but this flooding is from rainfall, not snow melt. It’s been too cold for snowmelt yet. Go stock up on meat and grains.


22 posted on 06/02/2011 11:24:38 PM PDT by tinamina
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To: SoldierDad

It’s good they have friends and family to go to.


23 posted on 06/03/2011 4:17:26 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: Sequoyah101

N.D. ranks second in nation for economic performance
http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/149938/

North Dakota economy booms, population soars

North Dakota is enjoying an oil boom in the western part of the state, drawing workers from across the country. Williston, in oil country, grew 17.6% to 14,716. The oil windfall has created a $1 billion state budget surplus.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/census/2011-03-16-north-dakota-census_N.htm


24 posted on 06/03/2011 4:45:36 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB ( "I don't want the majority if we don't stand for something"- Jim Demint)
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To: Grams A

BISMARCK — North Dakota’s Garrison Dam opened its emergency spillway gates for the first time today, and the river is expected to rise for the next several days.

Army Corps of Engineers project manager Todd Lindquist says the gates are being used because Lake Sakakawea has almost reached its water storage limit.

The gates have never been used to dump water out of Lake Sakakawea since the dam began operating in the 1950s. Lindquist says the release will be controlled by opening the gates by about a foot. There are 28 gates and they’ll be opened in groups of seven.

http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/205323/group/homepage/


25 posted on 06/03/2011 4:48:59 AM PDT by WOBBLY BOB ( "I don't want the majority if we don't stand for something"- Jim Demint)
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To: WOBBLY BOB

Prayers up for you all.


26 posted on 06/03/2011 8:52:17 AM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
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To: redhead

That’s not good. Any word on how long the river is expected to be at flood stage?


27 posted on 06/03/2011 8:56:57 AM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier currently deployed in the Valley of Death, Afghanistan)
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To: SoldierDad
"That’s not good. Any word on how long the river is expected to be at flood stage?"

From what I understand, the mandatory evacuation orders told residents of Minot to be prepared to be away for about two weeks. But there have been flood warnings up along all the major rivers for over a month. I'm surprised that there has been so little news about this, as it has been ongoing for some time.

28 posted on 06/03/2011 10:13:49 AM PDT by redhead (Get the &%@*$ Government OUT of our BUSINESS!)
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To: redhead

My wife’s younger sister called both her cell, and mine, with a cryptic message that it was vital that one of us return her call. When my wife returned her call it was all about the flooding and evacuation order. I’m not sure what she expected from us being here in CA.


29 posted on 06/03/2011 10:58:17 AM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier currently deployed in the Valley of Death, Afghanistan)
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To: SoldierDad; All
I know the feeling. My daughter-in-law is especially bummed out at even the thought of being stranded.

I thought you might be interested in this simple weather map from weatherunderground.com. Now, it looks like they will get to see whitecaps on their floodwaters. Woopeee.

30 posted on 06/03/2011 1:37:12 PM PDT by redhead (Get the &%@*$ Government OUT of our BUSINESS!)
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To: WOBBLY BOB; SoldierDad; BigSkyFreeper; bgill; Sequoyah101; Smokin' Joe; lurk; redhead; One Name

Is this flood man-made?

http://www.kfab.com/pages/voorhees.html?article=8659238

Tom Daschle has some ‘splainin’ to do.


31 posted on 06/09/2011 2:25:38 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX
For the last couple of decades ND residents near Lake Sakakaweja have been told the spring releases from the Garrison Dam were being done to float barge traffic down river to extend the commercial shipping season. Friends who retired on lakefront property saw the lake level decline to the point they were half a mile from the water, and the whole time the Corps was repeating the mantra about the economic necessity of barge traffic. Businesses folded, boat ramps were high and dry, lake access was limited and the local sport fishing and tourism industry suffered outrageously, but some barges at St. Louis were more important.

What is happening now is the result of record snowfall over the winter and continuing rain.

I'm not sure what was done in the Oahee Reservoir, but Ft. Peck and Sakakaweja have been kept low over the last few decades on the premise of facillitating navigation downstream.

32 posted on 06/09/2011 10:41:21 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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