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More Cracks in the Golden Dome - The University of Notre Dame’s ongoing confusions
NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE ^ | June 10, 2011 | George Weigel

Posted on 06/10/2011 5:33:32 PM PDT by neverdem

More Cracks in the Golden Dome
The University of Notre Dame's ongoing confusions

In 2001, the University of Notre Dame hired George O’Leary as its football coach: a position regarded by some alums, boosters, and board members as only slightly less significant than that held by the university’s president, and by others as of undoubtedly greater importance. Shortly after the hire, the Manchester Union Leader disclosed that O’Leary had engaged in some serious résumé padding, including claims for a master’s degree he had not earned from a university that did not exist. O’Leary’s tenure as head coach of the Fighting Irish ended three weeks after it began.

It now seems that, over the ensuing decade, Notre Dame didn’t learn much about due diligence, even as its leaders forgot a few more things about integrity and honesty.

Late in the spring term, Notre Dame announced that one of its alumnae, Roxanne Martino, a prominent Chicago investment manager, had been elected a member of the university’s board of trustees. Such a seemingly routine appointment — wealthy alum joins university board — would have drawn little notice at a less contentious moment in Catholic higher education. But by its 2009 decisions to make an unabashedly pro-abortion Barack Obama its commencement speaker and to honor him with an honorary doctor of laws degree, Notre Dame invited intense scrutiny by Catholics determined to hold the country’s flagship Catholic university to a standard of Catholic identity it seemed unwilling to maintain by itself. Thus, shortly after Ms. Martino joined the Notre Dame board, it came to light that she had been a longtime and significant contributor to Emily’s List, one of the nation’s premier pro-abortion lobbies.

Emily’s List does not mask its agenda behind a blizzard of euphemisms. Its website asks the visitor to “HELP US ELECT PRO-CHOICE DEMOCRATIC WOMEN.” The What We Do part of the site makes the organization’s goals quite clear: “We’re a full-service political team with a simple mission: to elect pro-choice Democratic women.” It would take a very dim observer of the contemporary political scene not to know what Emily’s List is all about. One might barely imagine that a Chicago donor who reflexively gives to the usual Democratic causes could write a check to Emily’s List under the impression that the organization was some sort of generic feminist lobby — although imagining a generic feminist lobby that is not pro-abortion takes even more, er, imagination.

Faced with the revelation that one of its new board members — one of those charged with guiding Notre Dame into the future — was in the habit of writing large checks to a pro-abortion lobby, the Notre Dame administration tried to wriggle out of the bind by claiming that Ms. Martino hadn’t realized that Emily’s List did what Emily’s List does. When that invited the obvious rejoinder that no one so unaware of elementary political reality had a claim to help guide a major university into the future, board chairman Richard Notebaert tried to save Ms. Martino, doubling down while clumsily changing the subject.

In an e-mail to the Wall Street Journal’s William McGurn, a Notre Dame alumnus who was on the case, Notebaert harrumphed that the fact that Ms. Martino “erred in not knowing completely about two of the many organizations to which she makes contributions does not in any way diminish the exemplary way in which she has lived her life and faith.” Moreover, the chairman averred, this is precisely “the sort of person we want on our board”: someone who is “a Notre Dame graduate, loving parent, dedicated to national and international service, a highly regarded professional in her field, and committed to all Catholic teachings.” (Memo to Mr. Notebaert: If those are your criteria for Notre Dame board membership, your letter inviting an alumnus of Notre Dame who is a distinguished journalist, a former presidential speechwriter, and a loving husband and parent to join the Notre Dame board should be in the mail today; I’m sure Bill McGurn will consider the possibility carefully.)

A week or so into the controversy, it seemed clear to all except the university’s board chairman and its president, Fr. John Jenkins, that Ms. Martino was unsalvageable: Either Notre Dame had a significant donor to an aggressive pro-abortion lobby among its trustees, or it had a board member whose judgment in making donations “on the basis of a recommendation from others” (as Notebaert put it to McGurn) raised severe questions about her competence to serve the university and its Catholic mission. Yet the dissembling continued and the implications of it for Notre Dame’s governance were briskly identified on June 4 by Fr. Wilson Miscamble, CSC, a distinguished diplomatic historian on the Notre Dame faculty.

In an address to a group of Notre Dame alumni concerned about the university’s Catholic identity, Miscamble said that board chairman Notebaert seemed “to have supplanted Fr. Jenkins in determining university policy” in the Martino affair. Then Miscamble, an Australian given to plain talking, cut to the chase: “If [Notebaert] can’t understand the damage that an appointment like this does to Notre Dame’s credibility and reputation as a Catholic university, then his credentials and capabilities to lead the board must surely be questioned.” And lest he be thought excessively clerical in calling out a lay board chairman, Father Miscamble immediately went on to lament the six members of his own religious order, the Congregation of the Holy Cross, who had acquiesced in Ms. Martino’s appointment.

After Father Jenkins had met with Bishop Kevin Rhoades of Fort Wayne–South Bend, this sad affair came to a formal end on June 8 when Ms. Martino resigned from the Notre Dame board, telling the Chicago Tribune that “the current controversy doesn’t allow me to be effective.” Yet the fallout from the Martino affair continues, and one finds some rather depressing indicators about Notre Dame’s future while sifting through the wreckage.

At no point during the controversy did the formidable Notre Dame publicity machine do the obvious and honorable thing: admit that due diligence had not been done; admit that a serious mistake had been made and that the mistake was deeply regretted; then state that Ms. Martino had been asked to remove herself from the board. Those watching from a distance could only conclude that Ms. Martino, Mr. Notebaert, and perhaps Father Jenkins simply did not understand what the fuss was about, and yielded only under unbearable pressure. That impression was strengthened by the affair’s untoward end game, which Father Miscamble described in a public statement after the Martino resignation:

I am grateful that Mrs. Martino had the decency to resign from the Board of Trustees but very disappointed that she included no apology in her statement for her sad record of donations to Emily’s List and other virulently pro-abortion PACs like Illinois State Personal PAC. I am further disappointed by the very limited press release from the University of Notre Dame and by the remarks of the board chairman, Mr. Richard Notebaert. He neither gives an apology for his earlier misleading statements concerning Mrs. Martino’s donations nor expresses regret for his failure to vet this appointment with appropriate diligence. Further, he gives no assurance that contributing in any way to explicitly “pro-choice” organizations in incompatible with service on the Notre Dame Board of Trustees.

The obtuseness displayed by the university administration and board chairman over the past two weeks suggests that neither the administration nor the board has learned the primary lesson it should have learned from the controversy over the Obama commencement in 2009: that an unambiguous, indeed happily robust, pro-life position, embodied in action and not just in abstract declarations of adhesion to Catholic teaching, is now the cultural marker of seriousness about Catholic identity in the American public square.

That this fact of 21st-century American Catholic life makes things difficult for Catholic tribal Democrats is undeniable. But efforts to dilute the weight and density of that cultural marker by, among others, Notre Dame faculty who find in Barack Obama the living embodiment of Catholic social doctrine now look ever more farcical, as indeed they seemed highly implausible before the administration’s policies began to crumble. (Republicans tempted to gloat here should be very careful: Catholics determined to strengthen, not dilute, Catholic identity in Catholic institutions will turn their fire on squishy members of the GOP just as readily as fire has been turned on Democrats.)

Irrespective of the politics involved, though, what is really disturbing about all this from a Catholic point of view is just how out-of-it Notre Dame’s leadership seems to be. The administration and board of a university that has long imagined itself on the cutting edge of Catholic culture in the United States seem to have completely missed the great sea-change that has taken place in the public life of U.S. Catholics since Roe v. Wade, Blessed John Paul II, and the emergence of the pro-life cause as the prime, although surely not sole, indicator of Catholic seriousness amidst the sundry contentions of the public square.

A month or so before the Martino affair broke, the Notre Dame faculty senate voted down a proposed resolution commending the president, Father Jenkins, for his efforts to strengthen Notre Dame’s pro-life commitment in the wake of the Obama commencement. That was weird enough. But windy faculty senates with little real power often do weird things. What is so striking about the Martino case, however, is that it makes clear that Father Jenkins’s modest efforts to demonstrate the university’s pro-life commitment since the 2009 Obama commencement have been largely in vain. Things have gotten worse, not better, since 2009.

If an Emily’s List contributor is considered a fit member of Notre Dame’s board of trustees by, among others, members of the religious congregation that founded Notre Dame, and if the Notre Dame board chairman flails about defending such a decision by suggesting that the nominee in question is an ideal Domer trustee, then the Catholic learning curve in South Bend remains a steep one.

— George Weigel is distinguished senior fellow of Washington’s Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. 



TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Editorial; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: abortion; catholic; notredame; prolife

1 posted on 06/10/2011 5:33:35 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

The only good thing about ND having all of its football games televised, is watching them lose. Bring back Jerry!


2 posted on 06/10/2011 6:00:53 PM PDT by Boiler Plate ("Why be difficult, when with just a little more work, you can be impossible" Mom)
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To: neverdem
Liberals doing what Liberals do:
infiltrating every segment of society possible.
3 posted on 06/10/2011 6:04:47 PM PDT by YHAOS (you betcha!)
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To: Boiler Plate

Right on


4 posted on 06/10/2011 6:23:28 PM PDT by squirt (POLITICIANS & DIAPERS NEED TO BE CHANGED, FOR THE SAME REASON)
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To: neverdem

Give me a break...this is the university that gave a student tailgating ticket to a 38 year old Gulf War Era veteran (who was a grad student at the time) about 10 years ago and refused to apologize. They didn’t give one to the others who were not students(many of which were much younger) or the student’s parents, some of which were his age. Stupid idiots.


5 posted on 06/10/2011 6:26:48 PM PDT by fuente
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To: neverdem

Gosh, I didn’t even know this school was still in business. Didn’t they disappear right around the time Milli Vanilli had to give up their Grammy award?


6 posted on 06/10/2011 6:44:28 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: Boiler Plate
Bring back Jerry!

Don't even know who Jerry is? Let us in on the joke.

Notre Dame football is not the subject of this long winded article but for the record, no football program in the nation has done as poorly with as much talent as Notre Dame for the last 20 years. Every year they get a top ten recruiting class and they have underperformed for that whole time. So something is really wrong there.

The problem with the president and the top officials of Notre Dame is that they want the respect of the Harvard president and their top officials more than that of the Pope.
7 posted on 06/10/2011 7:21:42 PM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: neverdem

The long and the short of it is that those of us who are ND alums and pro-life Catholics are looked down upon with real contempt by Jenkins and his buddies. I had a discussion about this with the executive director of the ND alumni association about 15 years ago, and he called me and others who think like me “single issue Catholics”.

This guy Notebaert is a real joke. He’s not an ND alumnus, but rather a CINO secular humanist and ruthless corporatist who graduated from Wisconsin-Madison (Notebaert was the CEO of Qwest, the big telephone company which operates between the Pacific Northwest and Lake Michigan). Obama was invited to ND because of Notebaert and Fr. Hesburgh (who, although 95 years old and has not been president of ND since 1986, is still in the middle of most things that go on there). Notebaert’s wife was involved in some sort of civic venture with Michelle Obama.

The sad thing is that ND will probably look for another trustee who believes what Martino believes but isn’t dumb enough to give to Emily’s List or Personal PAC. They’ll never pick pro-life conservative Catholics to sit on the board. One of the great pro-life crusaders in this country is ND alumnus Joe Scheidler. He’s got a snowball’s chance in hell of ever being asked to join the board, although he would be a fantastic addition.

Recently, it seems that when a leading position opens up at ND, and there is a pro-lifer and a pro-abort seeking that position, the pro-abort gets picked, and the pro-lifer gets the bum’s rush. The head football coach, the dean of the law school, the former dean of the Arts & Letters college, all of these are pro-aborts. I’m guessing Marianne Corr, the general counsel, is a pro-abort; she was directly responsible for the brutalization and arrest of pro-life crusader Father Norman Weslin; in the ND hierarchy, she is the “chief law officer” and is over the ND Security Police (who, under Indiana state law, have police powers, including arrest).

I’m guessing that Bishop Rhoades, who has struck me to date as pusillanimous, finally laid down the law to Jenkins. What Bp. Rhoades needs to do next is get Cardinal George of Chicago involved, and pressure Notebaert to quit. While Rhoades cannot excommunicate Jenkins as Jenkins is a member of a religious order which is not under the control of the diocese (the superior of the order lives in Rome and is supposedly obedient to the Pope), he could declare him persona non grata in the diocese.

Another ND guy who is complicit in bringing the university into disrepute is the Most Rev. Daniel Jenky, CSC, the Bishop of Peoria, Illinois. Jenky is an alum and was once the rector of the spectacular Basilica of the Sacred Heart on campus. Jenky appears to have gone along with the pro-abort trustee and the pro-abort appointments on campus.

Notre Dame is a fantastic place with really flawed leadership. It ought to be the single greatest university in the country, and they should not care a whit what the Ivy League thinks. We have the money, the facilities and the prestige. We’ve got a great student body, and great parents behind the kids. All we need is sound, principled leadership. If the board of trustees had a modicum of decency, they would all resign. Fr. Wilson Miscamble ought to be given the opportunity to run the university for a while. A new group of life fellows and a new board of trustees, 100% Catholic, 100% pro-life and 100% committed to the Catholic faith and tradition, need to be installed yesterday.


8 posted on 06/10/2011 7:40:31 PM PDT by nd76
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To: neverdem

9 posted on 06/10/2011 7:43:21 PM PDT by EternalVigilance (Some of us still 'hold these truths to be self-evident'..Enough to save the country? Time will tell.)
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To: truthguy

Jerry must mean “Gerry” Faust, who succeeded Dan Devine as head football coach in the 1981 through 1985 seasons. He once managed to beat the #1 team in the country on the road (Pitt, 31-16 in 1982 when Pitt had Dan Marino as QB), but managed to lose back to back games 36-6 and 58-7 to Penn State and Miami in 1985. Gerry wore his Catholicism on his sleeve, but was barely over .500 for his 5 years. Lou Holtz succeeded him, and won the national championship in 1988.


10 posted on 06/10/2011 7:44:42 PM PDT by nd76
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To: neverdem
What is so striking about the Martino case, however, is that it makes clear that Father Jenkins’s modest efforts to demonstrate the university’s pro-life commitment since the 2009 Obama commencement have been largely in vain. Things have gotten worse, not better, since 2009.

Can anyone fill me in?

I have little doubt that Jenkins actions were indeed "modest" but what has Jenkins done to "demonstrate the university’s pro-life commitment"?

11 posted on 06/10/2011 8:19:39 PM PDT by RJL
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To: neverdem

I used to have respect for Notre Dame..... not any more.


12 posted on 06/10/2011 8:27:54 PM PDT by boycott (CAL)
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To: neverdem

Excellent piece by George Weigel.


13 posted on 06/10/2011 8:37:07 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Boiler Plate
Weigle is an excellent writer and he is correct on this one. The role of the Catholic church today is to be the root of pro-life activities. From the Didache written in 75 A.D. to Pope John Paul II's Evangelium Vitae in 1995 the Church has consistently broadcast the pro-life message. And N.D. has the potential to reach millions with the same message.

Botton line: Either serve the Lord and His people or do what Fr. Jenkins does: server yourself.
14 posted on 06/10/2011 9:03:44 PM PDT by Falconspeed ("Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage with others." Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-94))
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To: boycott

Ditto.


15 posted on 06/10/2011 9:14:27 PM PDT by Dapper 26
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To: RJL

After it was deduced by ND beancounters that they had lost $120 million in donations as the result of the day of shame on May 17, 2009, they hastily arranged for Jenkins to walk in the March for Life on January 22, 2010. He supposedly also marched this past year. In my view, it was a phony, empty gesture—he probably went back to his hotel and took a shower to wash off the pro-life aroma.

Jenkins continues to endorse the Vagina Monologues, homosexual film festivals, liberal politicians, etc., etc. And, like I noted above, when a position opens and they have a choice between a pro-lifer and a pro-abort, you know who they are going to hire.


16 posted on 06/10/2011 9:28:42 PM PDT by nd76
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To: nd76

Thanks, That’s about what I figured Jenkins’ pro life actions would have entailed.


17 posted on 06/10/2011 9:36:17 PM PDT by RJL
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>> Article: Notre Dame faculty who find in Barack Obama the living embodiment of Catholic social doctrine now look ever more farcical, ...

And its enabler Jenkins forever an ass in my book.


18 posted on 06/10/2011 9:46:42 PM PDT by Gene Eric (*** Jesus ***)
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To: nd76; neverdem; YHAOS

Yup, this is just another example of leftists making their long march through the institutions. Just as I have read of charities, foundations, and societies being slowly taken over by leftists getting hired on staff and then hiring others of their ilk and slowly taking over.

But, sight unseen, it looks more like this started at the top and stayed there.


19 posted on 06/10/2011 10:18:25 PM PDT by sinanju
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To: Boiler Plate; truthguy; nd76

I know the article was not about football, but I have to get it off my chest that I’ve read some very convincing exposes about college football programs, i.e. that they should be regarded in the same light as municipally-funded white-elephant stadiums.

Can’t give you chapter and verse, but I’ve read that the big-time athletics programs in general and football in particular eat up far more time and treasure than they give back. “Prestige” notwithstanding.

This is not even to mention the ugly corruption and exploitation of student athletes that these programs inevitably give rise to.

A real act of academic seriousness would be for an institution of higher learning to dump these things and concentrate on scholastics. Alumni howls notwithstanding.


20 posted on 06/10/2011 10:26:30 PM PDT by sinanju
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To: sinanju
Greetings sinanju:

Just as I have read of charities, foundations, and societies being slowly taken over by leftists getting hired on staff and then hiring others of their ilk and slowly taking over.

Lest we forget the Mass Media. In a past life, a former employer was "The World's Greatest Newspaper." After the paper went public; leftists targeted the Human Resources Department, which quickly tossed the paper's credibility into the gutter.

Cheers,
OLA

21 posted on 06/10/2011 11:19:54 PM PDT by OneLoyalAmerican (In God I trust, all others provide citations.)
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To: sinanju
Can’t give you chapter and verse, but I’ve read that the big-time athletics programs in general and football in particular eat up far more time and treasure than they give back. “Prestige” notwithstanding.

Not really. Big Time Football at many universities actually helps to pay for the minor sports. This is not true at all universities that have big time sports programs but is true for many. I don't have a breakdown of the various 120 schools that are division 1A College Football.

At an institution like Notre Dame, you can rest assured that the women's soccer team is financially supported by their football program. Many universities would need to drop all or nearly all of their non-revenue sports if they didn't have football, and to a lesser extent basketball revenue. This is why these instititions put up with the shenanigans of college football and basketball.

The madness of Title IX has made the situation even worse. So these schools who have big time programs must continue these programs. Very few schools in Division 1A are like Duke and Stanford who can afford these non-revenue programs without football revenue. No Football- no soccer, no volleyball, no swimming, no women's softball, etc.
22 posted on 06/11/2011 11:42:21 AM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: truthguy

In Jim Thorpes’ day, an athlete played several sports. Not that long ago there were “four letter” men. I think Doak Walker was one. Today college football is so specialized, so demanding that no one does that any more. The business has become professionalized. The broadcasting networks have poured tons of money into football and basketball, relatively little of it going to other sports, men’s or women’s. I recall the “outrage” felt at the University of Texas back in the early ‘60s when the professorate found out how much Darrell Royal was being paid after a bootlegged copy of his tax return made the rounds. Now what Royal received, even factoring for inflation, is peanuts compared with what big-tme college coaches make. But it really goes back to the days of Rockne, when he stopped teaching chemistry because he was taking in serious money just for coaching etc. Most places, of course, coaching was stiull a small time thing. Not much different than it was for Eisenhower and James Van Fleet. Eisenhower was an outrstanding coach for army post teams, and he did it to supplement his regular army pay. and Van Fleet good enough to turn professional if he had chosen. But, again, Big time sports has become an industry and everything serves its “stakeholders”of which the students who are not players scarcely benefit.


23 posted on 06/11/2011 1:06:40 PM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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To: RobbyS
Big time sports has become an industry and everything serves its “stakeholders”of which the students who are not players scarcely benefit.

Really? How about the women's volleyball or softball team? Don't they benefit? Today women are getting athletic scholarships from football money. They wouldn't even have their sports unless they got revenue from the Football program. Do you think Women's Softball generates enough money for coaches, equipment, scholarships, etc. They wouldn't have these programs without football revenue unless it was a extremely wealthy University.

BTW, Just who are these "stakeholders" you speak of?
24 posted on 06/11/2011 2:09:01 PM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: truthguy

When college football was small-time, all of the sports cost about the same. But it is now big-time and the lion’s share of all revenues go to it. In effect the others are treated like scavengers. My cousin’s cousin was a coach for Colorado, who went to the Orange Bowl. Almost none of the money from that game went to the college at large. It went into the football program, because the competition with other schools is very great, and so more and more money must be spent on it on the revenue will keep coming in. If it falls off, it drains the University. It is a lot like show business.


25 posted on 06/11/2011 2:21:39 PM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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To: RobbyS
When college football was small-time, all of the sports cost about the same. But it is now big-time and the lion’s share of all revenues go to it. In effect the others are treated like scavengers.

When college football was small time, women's sports didn't exist or were very, very small. The lion's share of the revenue goes to football because the lion's share of revenue is generated by football. Do you think the revenue is generated out of thin air? That's Obama type thinking. Women's sports at any major university brings in something less than 1% of the total revenue. Do you think women's softball should get the same as the football program? Honestly!
26 posted on 06/11/2011 2:27:37 PM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: sinanju

ND football is one of the few exceptions. It generates enough money to pay for the entire athletic department, and then some. ND has its own merchandise/licensing operation, which generates even more money.

Only the University of Texas, Ohio State and a couple others are in the same league as ND football when it comes to generating money and making a profit.


27 posted on 06/11/2011 6:53:26 PM PDT by nd76
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To: RobbyS

Ara Parseghian was the coach the first three years I was at ND. At that time, tuition, room and board was about $4k per year, and the highest paid professor on campus was making about $30,000 per year (this is before the Carter administration’s student loan program that caused rampant inflation in the cost of college).

Officially, Ara didn’t receive any more from the university than the highest paid professor. However, he was a spokesman for Ford automobiles, made a number of lucrative personal appearances across the country, and was set up in an insurance business by a number of wealthy alums, so his total compensation was in the six figures (very high by mid-1970s standards). His last football season was 1974. He never coached again; he was a football commentator on ABC and CBS for 15+ years.


28 posted on 06/11/2011 6:58:05 PM PDT by nd76
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To: sinanju
But, sight unseen, it looks more like this started at the top and stayed there.

Infiltration does not necessarily commence at the bottom. It can come from the top. Witness the National Girl Scouts or the YWCA.

”Sight unseen,” indeed. You’re right; we can’t know the extent of the infiltration, but the recent dust-up demonstrates it has not infested the entire institution.

29 posted on 06/11/2011 9:21:44 PM PDT by YHAOS (you betcha!)
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To: sinanju

Personally I think the NCAA Football and Basketball should just be taken over by the NFL and NBA respectively and just hand the schools a check. Then go ahead and pay the players.

The whole thing is corrupt and the NCAA is enriching themselves on the efforts of so called student athletes.

If GE and Lockheed Marting can pay engineering students why can’t the NFL and NBA?

There is only one sport in college that makes money and that is Men’s Basketball. A good Football program breaks even a great one will make some money at times. Football brings in Alumni donations, that’s why the newer stadium have executive suites.


30 posted on 06/11/2011 9:23:21 PM PDT by Boiler Plate ("Why be difficult, when with just a little more work, you can be impossible" Mom)
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To: sinanju

Personally I think the NCAA Football and Basketball should just be taken over by the NFL and NBA respectively and just hand the schools a check. Then go ahead and pay the players.

The whole thing is corrupt and the NCAA is enriching themselves on the efforts of so called student athletes.

If GE and Lockheed Marting can pay engineering students why can’t the NFL and NBA?

There is only one sport in college that makes money and that is Men’s Basketball. A good Football program breaks even a great one will make some money at times. Football brings in Alumni donations, that’s why the newer stadium have executive suites.


31 posted on 06/11/2011 9:23:44 PM PDT by Boiler Plate ("Why be difficult, when with just a little more work, you can be impossible" Mom)
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To: truthguy

Football and badsketball programs have developed enormously since the ‘60s. The colleges have become the minor leagues for the NFL, of course, but more than that, they have grown for their own sakes. Students have become less and less a part of them, even as spectators. The UT programs includes a few hundred students as players etc. The athletes exist as a breed apart from the regular students. Their job is draw attention to the school. The recent incident in Ohio is an example of the corruption that has long plagued the schools. Look what happened at USC and at SMU, where the chreating wass done clumsily. I don’t buy that athletes are treated poorly. Were it not for their athletic talent they would not have the chnage to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Even those who do not go on to the NFL, acquires connections that—if they keep straight—leaad them to nice careers in business. But it is a lot like show business. Lots of talent. but just a few good roles.


32 posted on 06/11/2011 9:38:50 PM PDT by RobbyS (Pray with the suffering souls.)
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