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SWAT Team Mania: The War Against the American Citizen
rutherford.org ^ | 13 June, 2011 | John W. Whitehead

Posted on 06/14/2011 4:17:25 AM PDT by marktwain

“He [a federal agent] had his knee on my back and I had no idea why they were there.”--Anthony Wright, victim of a Dept. of Education SWAT team raid

The militarization of American police--no doubt a blowback effect of the military empire--has become an unfortunate part of American life. In fact, it says something about our reliance on the military that federal agencies having nothing whatsoever to do with national defense now see the need for their own paramilitary units. Among those federal agencies laying claim to their own law enforcement divisions are the State Department, Department of Education, Department of Energy, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Park Service, to name just a few. These agencies have secured the services of fully armed agents--often in SWAT team attire--through a typical bureaucratic sleight-of-hand provision allowing for the creation of Offices of Inspectors General (OIG). Each OIG office is supposedly charged with not only auditing their particular agency’s actions but also uncovering possible misconduct, waste, fraud, theft, or certain types of criminal activity by individuals or groups related to the agency’s operation. At present, there are 73 such OIG offices in the federal government that, at times, perpetuate a police state aura about them.

For example, it was heavily armed agents from one such OIG office, working under the auspices of the Department of Education, who forced their way into the home of a California man, handcuffed him, and placed his three children (ages 3, 7, and 11) in a squad car while they conducted a search of his home. This federal SWAT team raid, which is essentially what it was, on the home of Anthony Wright on Tuesday, June 7, 2011, was allegedly intended to ferret out information on Wright’s estranged wife, Michelle, who no longer lives with him and who was suspected of financial aid fraud (early news reports characterized the purpose of the raid as being over Michelle’s delinquent student loans). According to Wright, he was awakened at 6 am by the sound of agents battering down his door and, upon descending the stairs, was immediately subdued by police. One neighbor actually witnessed the team of armed agents surround the house and, after forcing entry, they “dragged [Wright] out in his boxer shorts, threw him to the ground and handcuffed him.”

This is not the first time a SWAT team has been employed in non-violent scenarios. Nationwide, SWAT teams have been employed to address an astonishingly trivial array of criminal activity or mere community nuisances: angry dogs, domestic disputes, improper paperwork filed by an orchid farmer, and misdemeanor marijuana possession, to give a brief sampling. In some instances, SWAT teams are even employed, in full armament, to perform routine patrols.

How did we allow ourselves to travel so far down the road to a police state? While we are now grappling with a power-hungry police state at the federal level, the militarization of domestic American law enforcement is largely the result of the militarization of local police forces, which are increasingly militaristic in their uniforms, weaponry, language, training, and tactics and have come to rely on SWAT teams in matters that once could have been satisfactorily performed by traditional civilian officers. Even so, this transformation of law enforcement at the local level could not have been possible without substantial assistance from on high.

Frequently justified as vital tools necessary to combat terrorism and deal with rare but extremely dangerous criminal situations, such as those involving hostages, SWAT teams--which first appeared on the scene in California in the 1960s--have now become intrinsic parts of local law enforcement operations, thanks in large part to substantial federal assistance. For example, in 1994, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Department of Defense agreed to a memorandum of understanding that enabled the transfer of federal military technology to local police forces. Following the passage of the Defense Authorization Security Act of 1997, which was intended to accelerate the transfer of military equipment to domestic law enforcement departments, local police acquired military weaponry--gratuitously or at sharp discounts--at astonishing rates. Between 1997 and 1999, the agency created by the Defense Authorization Security Act conveyed 3.4 million orders of military equipment to over 11,000 local police agencies in all 50 states. Not only did this vast abundance of military weaponry contribute to a more militarized police force, but it also helped spur the creation of SWAT teams in jurisdictions across the country.

In one of the few quantitative studies on the subject, criminologist Peter Kraska found in 1997 that close to 90 percent of cities with populations exceeding 50,000 and at least 100 sworn officers had at least one paramilitary unit. In a separate study, Kraska determined that, as of 1996, 65 percent of towns with populations between 25,000 and 50,000 had a paramilitary unit, with an additional 8 percent intending to establish one.

While the frequency of SWAT operations has increased dramatically in recent years, jumping from 1,000 to 40,000 raids per year by 2001, it appears to have less to do with increases in violent crime and more to do with law enforcement bureaucracy and a police state mentality. Indeed, according to Kraska’s estimates, 75-80 percent of SWAT callouts are now for mere warrant service. In some jurisdictions, SWAT teams are responsible for servicing 100 percent of all drug warrants issued. A Maryland study, conducted in the wake of a botched raid in 2008 that resulted in the mistaken detainment of Berwyn Heights mayor Cheye Calvo and the shooting deaths of his two dogs, corroborates Kraska’s findings. According to the study, SWAT teams are deployed 4.5 times per day in Maryland with 94 percent of those deployments being for something as minor as serving search or arrest warrants. In the county in which the Calvo raid occurred, more than 50 percent of SWAT operations carried out were for misdemeanors or non-serious felonies.

This overuse of paramilitary forces and increased reliance on military weaponry has inevitably resulted in a pervasive culture of militarism in domestic law enforcement. Police mimicry of the military is enhanced by the war-heavy imagery and metaphors associated with law enforcement activity: the war on drugs, the war on crime, etc. Moreover, it is estimated that 46 percent of paramilitary units were trained by “active-duty military experts in special operations.” In turn, the military mindset adopted by many SWAT members encourages a tendency to employ lethal force. After all, soldiers are authorized to terminate enemy combatants. As Lawrence Korb, a former official in the Reagan Administration, put it, soldiers are “trained to vaporize, not Mirandize.”

Ironically, despite the fact that SWAT team members are subject to greater legal restraints than their counterparts in the military, they are often less well-trained in the use of force than are the special ops soldiers on which they model themselves. Indeed, SWAT teams frequently fail to conform to the basic precautions required in military raids. For instance, after reading about a drug raid in Missouri, an army officer currently serving in Afghanistan commented:

My first thought on reading this story is this: Most American police SWAT teams probably have fewer restrictions on conducting forced entry raids than do US forces in Afghanistan. For our troops over here to conduct any kind of forced entry, day or night, they have to meet one of two conditions: have a bad guy (or guys) inside actively shooting at them; or obtain permission from a 2-star general, who must be convinced by available intelligence (evidence) that the person or persons they’re after is present at the location, and that it’s too dangerous to try less coercive methods.

Remember, SWAT teams originated as specialized units dedicated to defusing extremely sensitive, dangerous situations. As the role of paramilitary forces has expanded, however, to include involvement in nondescript police work targeting nonviolent suspects, the mere presence of SWAT units has actually injected a level of danger and violence into police-citizen interactions that was not present as long as these interactions were handled by traditional civilian officers. In one drug raid, for instance, an unarmed pregnant woman was shot as she attempted to flee the police by climbing out a window. In another case, the girlfriend of a drug suspect and her young child crouched on the floor in obedience to police instructions during the execution of a search warrant. One officer proceeded to shoot the family dogs. His fellow officer, in another room, mistook the shots for hostile gunfire and fired blindly into the room where the defendant crouched, killing her and wounding her child.

What we are witnessing is an inversion of the police-civilian relationship. Rather than compelling police officers to remain within constitutional bounds as servants of the people, ordinary Americans are being placed at the mercy of law enforcement. This is what happens when paramilitary forces are used to conduct ordinary policing operations, such as executing warrants on nonviolent defendants. Yet studies indicate that paramilitary raids frequently result in misdemeanor convictions. An investigation by Denver’s Rocky Mountain News revealed that of the 146 no-knock raids conducted in Denver in 2000, only 49 resulted in charges. And only two resulted in prison sentences for suspects targeted in the raids.

General incompetence, collateral damage (fatalities, property damage, etc.) and botched raids tend to go hand in hand with an overuse of paramilitary forces. In some cases, officers misread the address on the warrant. In others, they simply barge into the wrong house or even the wrong building. In another subset of cases (such as the Department of Education raid on Anthony Wright’s home), police conduct a search of a building where the suspect no longer resides. SWAT teams have even on occasion conducted multiple, sequential raids on wrong addresses or executed search warrants despite the fact that the suspect is already in police custody. Police have also raided homes on the basis of mistaking the presence or scent of legal substances for drugs. Incredibly, these substances have included tomatoes, sunflowers, fish, elderberry bushes, kenaf plants, hibiscus, and ragweed.

All too often, botched SWAT team raids have resulted in one tragedy after another for the residents with little consequences for law enforcement. Judges tend to afford extreme levels of deference to police officers who have mistakenly killed innocent civilians but do not afford similar leniency to civilians who have injured police officers in acts of self-defense. Even homeowners who mistake officers for robbers can be sentenced for assault or murder if they take defensive actions resulting in harm to police.

And as journalist Radley Balko shows in his in-depth study of police militarization, the shock-and-awe tactics utilized by many SWAT teams only increases the likelihood that someone will get hurt. Drug warrants, for instance, are typically served by paramilitary units late at night or shortly before dawn. Unfortunately, to the unsuspecting homeowner--especially in cases involving mistaken identities or wrong addresses--a raid can appear to be nothing less than a violent home invasion, with armed intruders crashing through their door. The natural reaction would be to engage in self-defense. Yet such a defensive reaction on the part of a homeowner, particularly a gun owner, will spur officers to employ lethal force.

That’s exactly what happened to Jose Guerena, the young ex-Marine who was killed after a SWAT team kicked open the door of his Arizona home during a drug raid and opened fire. According to news reports, Guerena, 26 years old and the father of two young children, grabbed a gun in response to the forced invasion but never fired. In fact, the safety was still on his gun when he was killed. Police officers were not as restrained. The young Iraqi war veteran was allegedly fired upon 71 times. Guerena had no prior criminal record, and the police found nothing illegal in his home.

The problems inherent in these situations are further compounded by the fact that SWAT teams are granted “no-knock” warrants at high rates such that the warrants themselves are rendered practically meaningless. This sorry state of affairs is made even worse by recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings that have essentially done away with the need for a “no-knock” warrant altogether, giving the police authority to disregard the protections afforded American citizens by the Fourth Amendment.

In the process, Americans are rendered altogether helpless and terror-stricken as a result of these confrontations with the police. Indeed, “terrorizing” is a mild term to describe the effect on those who survive such vigilante tactics. “It was terrible. It was the most frightening experience of my life. I thought it was a terrorist attack,” said 84-year-old Leona Goldberg, a victim of such a raid. Yet this type of “terrorizing” activity is characteristic of the culture that we have created. As author Eugene V. Walker, a former Boston University professor, wrote some years ago, “A society in which people are already isolated and atomized, divided by suspicious and destructive rivalry, would support a system of terror better than a society without much chronic antagonism.”


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: banglist; bloodoftyrants; constitution; donttreadonme; donutwatch; government; jackbootedthugs; jbt; killswat; leo; militarizedpolice; noknockraids; noknockwarrant; oig; paramilitary; paramilitarypolice; police; policestate; rapeofliberty; roguecops; standdown; standingarmy; swat; swatabuse; swatassholes; thinblueline; tyranny
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All officers take an oath to protect and defend the Constituion of the United States, and usually of their home state. We need to use the new media to hold them accountable for the observance of their oath.
1 posted on 06/14/2011 4:17:29 AM PDT by marktwain
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To: marktwain

The Dept. of Education apparently “misplaced” some
of the student-repaid money; and to cover this up
“confuses” tyranny with due process.


2 posted on 06/14/2011 4:21:01 AM PDT by Diogenesis (Nothing surpasses the complexity of the human mind. - Leto II: Dar-es-Balat)
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To: marktwain

The Africanization of America proceeds apace.


3 posted on 06/14/2011 4:22:39 AM PDT by Jack Hammer
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To: marktwain

Horse, meet Barn Door. After all, it was all fun and games when they were just sticking it to the druggies, eh?


4 posted on 06/14/2011 4:25:05 AM PDT by Wolfie
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To: marktwain

This is a big issue.

SWAT teams are for violent situations.

And there should be no such thing as a no-knock warrant.

If you tolerate these things, the governement will use them more and more. The Jose Guerena murder was a wake-up call.

How many folks have been killed in their own homes, many times the result of a mistaken address? How many family pets are shot dead, in front of children, to “make a point”?

And for what, a war on drugs that is 40 years old with no sign of ending?

These hut-hut-hut shock and awe troops are out of control, against our own citizens, with no accountability.

Either the Fourth Amendment has meaning or it does not.


5 posted on 06/14/2011 4:29:30 AM PDT by exit82 (Democrats are the enemy of freedom. Sarah Palin is our Esther.)
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To: marktwain

Imagine how much local taxes could be saved if SWAT teams were cut from the budget.


6 posted on 06/14/2011 4:29:57 AM PDT by pnh102 (Regarding liberalism, always attribute to malice what you think can be explained by stupidity. - Me)
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To: marktwain
All officers take an oath to protect and defend the Constituion of the United States, and usually of their home state. We need to use the new media to hold them accountable for the observance of their oath.
How are we going to do that when the Supreme Court seems to think that the constitution doesn't prohibit these murderous home invasions?

In recent months, because of reading more and more of these stories, I have completely reversed myself on the position of the Drug War.

I would now rather try to deal (as a society) with the consequences of increased drug use than have this backwoods 3rd-world animals-in-uniform running the Thugocracy known as America.

End the War on Drugs and you end 90% of the justification for these unspeakable savages. I know they'll come up with other reasons (like unpaid student loans), but taking away the War on Drugs will go a long way towards pulling the carpet out from under their feet.

7 posted on 06/14/2011 4:34:37 AM PDT by samtheman
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To: exit82

“SWAT teams are for violent situations”.

I understand when SWAT is sent in on a situation where there are hostages or major bad guys (like the D.C. snipers for example). I understand that but to send them for unpaid student loans etc.. is ridiculous. What’s next? Unpaid parking tickets? To me, this is more than just a big issue. It is downright FRIGHTENING!!


8 posted on 06/14/2011 4:34:45 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: marktwain

American police are becoming nothing less then Jack Booted Thugs.
I saw stark examples of it before I left the USSA in 2004.


9 posted on 06/14/2011 4:41:08 AM PDT by AlexW (Proud eligibility skeptic)
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To: marktwain

Cops on FR have expressed frustration that their “rules of engagement” are tighter than those in Afghanistan.


10 posted on 06/14/2011 4:42:58 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Diogenesis

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION S.W.A.T. team ???????

As a citizen, I am outraged and demand that the Secretary be hauled before congress to explain just what in hell is going on.


11 posted on 06/14/2011 4:43:47 AM PDT by Walrus (Government abuse of taxing powers caused the FIRST American Revolution...)
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To: Jack Hammer

Africanization? More like Stalin, Castro or any number of other dictators.


12 posted on 06/14/2011 4:44:02 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: marktwain
65 percent of towns with populations between 25,000 and 50,000 had a paramilitary unit,
One of those is mine. Our pop is 32.000 (maybe 35K now ) and we have a SWAT Unit. The only *problem* is we don't have any violent crime.

The last murder was 3 years ago. Committed by one of the Amish guys from Chicago who was visiting his 'girlfriend' in one of the Section Eight apartment complexes on the south side of town (we have 3 around there iirc). He was captured by old fashioned police work - fingerprints' - in three days 'hiding out' in Chicago at his mother's house, Doh!.

Our biggest Crime Problem is some a-holes who are breaking car windows and stealing stuff in plain view on the car seat. Those crimes are centralized in two areas and a GD stakeout could prolly catch the mutts. NO SWAT TEAM NEEDED.

Yet we have one
(I bet their Pinochle and Gin Rummy skills have increased x 106).

13 posted on 06/14/2011 4:46:40 AM PDT by Condor51 (The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits [A.Einstein])
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To: momtothree

Several years ago a city used a SWAT team to conduct a no-knock on a family. A 2 yr old child was held at gun point during the raid.

The offense? The father was suspected of exceeding his limit while fishing that day.


14 posted on 06/14/2011 4:47:10 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Diogenesis

Bump.


15 posted on 06/14/2011 4:48:09 AM PDT by GlockThe Vote (F U B O ! ! !)
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To: marktwain
This story should scare the hell out of every one of you. We are marching headlong into a Soviet Style police state. We blow it off because it isn't our door the SWAT team is busting down... but it could be! We should be outraged; this is more of a threat to our freedom than any single issue. These are the enforcers of tyranny!

Mike

16 posted on 06/14/2011 4:54:00 AM PDT by MichaelP (The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly is to fill the world with fools ~HS)
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To: marktwain; harpseal; TexasCowboy; nunya bidness; AAABEST; Travis McGee; Squantos; wku man; SLB; ...

The deliberate militarization of our domestic police forces has been going on for a very long time. Note the date on the magazine cover. Some have been pointing this out for quite a while now. At some point it gets so large it can no longer be ignored. That time is now.

Although their equipment and tactics may overlap to a large degree, very few understand any longer the fundamental difference between military and police operations: The military's role is, as the saying goes, 'to kill people and break things'. Their mission is to close with an enemy and destroy him.

However, domestic police are, or used to be, operating under the paradigm of facing citizens who have rights and whom are presumed innocent until proven guilty. These roles are at opposite ends of the spectrum.

Unfortunately, this all-important distinction has been lost to most, and overall, in time, with all the military gear and military training goes the military mindset. The principle of policing, at least as defined by American jurisprudence, is lost.


17 posted on 06/14/2011 4:56:51 AM PDT by Joe Brower (Sheep have three speeds: "graze", "stampede" and "cower".)
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To: driftdiver

“... suspected of exceeding his limit while fishing that day”.

That is absolutely horrifying. I believe the idea of SWAT is to save an innocent two year old from a kidnapping situation or a hostage event.. something like that. NOT be the goons that actually terrorize a little baby! Dang, I think I have an overdue library book. I better pay the fine and get it back right now or my three kids will be held at gunpoint and my dogs shot. Just, dang!


18 posted on 06/14/2011 4:57:32 AM PDT by momtothree
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To: marktwain
"While the frequency of SWAT operations has increased dramatically in recent years, jumping from 1,000 to 40,000 raids per year by 2001, it appears to have less to do with increases in violent crime and more to do with law enforcement bureaucracy and a police state mentality. Indeed, according to Kraska’s estimates, 75-80 percent of SWAT callouts are now for mere warrant service. In some jurisdictions, SWAT teams are responsible for servicing 100 percent of all drug warrants issued."
19 posted on 06/14/2011 5:10:02 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: driftdiver

Police departments are the ONLY organizations that should be permitted to maintain SWAT teams, and limited ones, at that.

I can think of nothing more dangerous to our liberty than a bureaucrat with a SWAT team backing him up.


20 posted on 06/14/2011 5:13:30 AM PDT by Walrus (Government abuse of taxing powers caused the FIRST American Revolution...)
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To: momtothree
"“SWAT teams are for create violent situations”."
21 posted on 06/14/2011 5:14:27 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Walrus
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION S.W.A.T. team ???????

As a citizen, I am outraged and demand that the Secretary be hauled before congress to explain just what in hell is going on.

Yeah, rotsa ruck getting anyone to exhibit even a modicum of outrage or be seen as "soft on crime!"

Even the Demo-Rats who ostensibly pretend to be the "Defenders of Civil Liberties" are hiding under their desks and don't look to our Wuss "Weaper of the House" or any other Republi-Tards, to take up this issue.

My prediction: One day soon, a very prominent person (hopefully a Congress-Critter) will get caught up in one of these incidents with injury/death resulting and then (and only then) will we witness a backlash, calls for hearings and a reigning in of these para-military, Jack-Booted, Fascist, Thugs!

Sadly (and as a former Fed Agent and Nam Vet) my respect (and I'm not alone) for the Police has gradually diminished due to their actions and disregard for our rights and their routinely suborning the Constitution in an effort to make their job easier.

Worst, it now appears that many courts (reminiscent of the Get Tough, Law and Order days of Tricky Dick Nixon) are now affording Law Enforcement Agencies ever more power and authority, while holding them ever more "Harmless" and providing them with "Immunities" they do not deserve.

Lastly, I continue to question: IF these SWAT teams are operating on solid ground and not abusing their authority, WHY oh WHY must they [COWARDLY] hide their identity by covering their face with masks; something only Terrorist and perhaps, Armed Robbers do?

22 posted on 06/14/2011 5:15:27 AM PDT by Conservative Vermont Vet (l)
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To: momtothree

“I believe the idea of SWAT is to save an innocent two year old from a kidnapping situation or a hostage event”

yes but those situations are exceedingly rare and are insufficient to justify the expense. So police departments look to expand the use of SWAT to keep em busy.

Also, police departments seem to pick the most dangerous time/place to arrest people. Which results in more violence, injuries, and deaths on both sides of the equation.


23 posted on 06/14/2011 5:16:40 AM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver

IMHO, if a local county or town type police don’t have the crime numbers to keep up with the cost of a SWAT team, then get rid of them. They can still use the state police SWAT team. Actions have consequences. People will be outraged enough to start questioning the need, tactics etc... and then the public opinion nightmare will result. In short, I think the local police agencies “need” community support. Without it, their jobs become much more difficult with pay raises etc..


24 posted on 06/14/2011 5:21:56 AM PDT by momtothree
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Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

To: marktwain

“Unfortunately, to the unsuspecting homeowner—especially in cases involving mistaken identities or wrong addresses—a raid can appear to be nothing less than a violent home invasion, with armed intruders crashing through their door. The natural reaction would be to engage in self-defense. Yet such a defensive reaction on the part of a homeowner, particularly a gun owner, will spur officers to employ lethal force.”

Bingo. We have a winner. This is exactly what would happen to me. I am not a criminal. I always have a gun on me or near me while home. If they come crashing into my home I will start shooting, and I will surely be a dead man with the firepower they posess.

This SWAT issue has got to be dealt with. We are talking life or death. Their mistakes should not be easily dismissed. If I make a mistake at work it can be fixed. You cannot bring an innocent man back from the dead.

Unbelievable....


26 posted on 06/14/2011 5:24:19 AM PDT by bbernard
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To: marktwain

Sue the invading force (SWAT or not) AND the judge approving the excessive force!


27 posted on 06/14/2011 5:28:11 AM PDT by G Larry (I dream of a day when a man is judged by the content of his character)
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To: marktwain
We Want YOU for the SWAT Team!


28 posted on 06/14/2011 5:35:18 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: marktwain
As one poster said, this is deliberate.

Marshall Mcluhan, “The Medium is the Message: An Inventory of Effects (1967)” made the point that if you have it you will use it, just because you have it.

They have it and they are using it just because they have it.

Why? Because they can.

Welcome to boot on the face time (tip o the hat to Orwell).

29 posted on 06/14/2011 5:37:29 AM PDT by hfr (All their views twisted into news)
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To: Condor51

There is a sick symbiotic relationship between the federal law enforcement agencies and local police dept.

The feds shovel “war on drugs” and “war on terror” funding at the local PDs, and get them hooked on this stream of money and equipment.

In return, the local SWAT serves as a force multiplier for the FLEAs when they need extra muscle in that jurisdiction. In this way, just a small squad of feds can call on the services of a much bigger local SWAT team when they want to conduct a raid in force.

It’s how the USA is evolving a “virtual national police force,” something our founding fathers dreaded.


30 posted on 06/14/2011 5:40:18 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: Walrus

Well, there goes my dream of starting up a Privateer/Security Contractor business...


31 posted on 06/14/2011 5:44:07 AM PDT by Dead Corpse (explosive bolts, ten thousand volts at a million miles an hour)
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To: G Larry
AND the judge approving the excessive force!

A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers. H. L. Mencken ... No judge will ever find against another judge for this sort of crap. It won't end UNTIL the individual JBTs who participate in these home invasions are found CRIMINALLY liable for their actions. And don't hold your breath for that happening.

Closest I know of came in 2006 in Atl. An Atlanta police thug squad raided the house of a 92 year old woman kind of on a whim. Shot her and then according to standard police procedure let her bleed to death while they "secured the premesis" ie faked the scene. At first they claimed she shot at them and that a "confidential informat" had given them the information. Turned out they made the whole informant thing up. ALso turned out that the shots supposedly fired by the 92 yo were actually fired by the police later to make it look as though she shot at them. Later they changed their stories. Now the only reason that anyone got in trouble was that the officers who did the shooting were white and their victim was black, and the Atlanta city government is overwhelmingly black. Even so the worst that happened is that the murderers were charged with "violating oath of office" and got a couple of years in jail. Never charged with murder, or home invasion.

32 posted on 06/14/2011 5:44:15 AM PDT by from occupied ga (your own government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: Travis McGee
2 things:

1st note to self: The medium is the “mAssage”, not “mEssage”.

2nd note to TM: Good post, appreciate the clarity and definition you give to this.

33 posted on 06/14/2011 5:47:02 AM PDT by hfr (All their views twisted into news)
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To: Travis McGee
It’s how the USA is evolving a “virtual national police force,” something our founding fathers dreaded.

I've since one good researcher call such a militarized police force the same as a "standing army" as it was known to the Founders.

34 posted on 06/14/2011 5:48:00 AM PDT by bvw
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To: bvw

Yes, it’s a virtual standing army to be used at federal direction against the citizens of the USA.


35 posted on 06/14/2011 5:49:18 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: hfr

Here is another critical aspect of this to understand. When the city hall bean counters ask the chief of police why they are spending millions on a SWAT team that was only used 20 times last year, what will happen next year?

The SWAT team will be used 200 times next year, even with no increase in actual crime. They will shoot cats out of trees. Anything to justify the continued large budget. It’s a feedback loop.


36 posted on 06/14/2011 5:51:43 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: Conservative Vermont Vet

Same here from a conservative Florida Vet (era only, no SEA service).

Two things trouble me above all else: The casual employment of these teams for routine activities. Why have fed agents or police if their jobs do not also include routine duties? Why not make everyone a SWAT officer because that is where this seems to be going. Second, the face masks. Where the hell are we, in some south american third world nation? Face masks, I don’t get it.

New saying: When seconds count, the police are minutes away but when no crime is ongoing, swat can be there in one second.


37 posted on 06/14/2011 5:52:22 AM PDT by Mouton (Voting is an opiate of the electorate. Nothing changes no matter who wins..)
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To: marktwain

SWAT is nothing more than a black hole to throw good taxpayers money down, but it does make a lot of small penJJJJ cops feel manly, that and them punching their wives around.


38 posted on 06/14/2011 5:52:28 AM PDT by org.whodat
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To: Travis McGee

I see that before my first coffee I am more prone to typos.

One of my ancestors (or near ancestors) was involved with situation with British troops they were forced to quarter in their house, the husband complained to the town magistrate that the troopers would harass his wife and took a whole roast from her at bayonet point as she was preparing it to cook for the household.


39 posted on 06/14/2011 5:55:33 AM PDT by bvw
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To: Mouton

Your local ELECTED Sheriff is supposed to protect his county constituents from crap like this.

If you haven’t, send him a letter informing him of this duty.


40 posted on 06/14/2011 5:56:18 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
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To: Travis McGee

Why did this ever develop in the the first place? My sense of things is that there is a trajectory we have been on for decades (at least) leading to exactly the loss of American Constitutional government.

The question remains, how, or why, did we start along this trajectory? I suggest it is a tendency in evidence by things like Colonel House’s “Edmund Drew” at a very early date. Maybe even earlier, but not so thought out as a developed worldview.


41 posted on 06/14/2011 6:00:05 AM PDT by hfr (All their views twisted into news)
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To: hfr
Most folks trace the inception of the modern SWAT team to the aftermath of the Charles Whitman/Texas Tower sniper even at the UT in the 1960s, when the local police had no response protocols for such an event.
42 posted on 06/14/2011 6:04:20 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: bvw

Now they just shove women to the ground, terrorize the kids, shoot the pet dogs and stomp on the kittens.


43 posted on 06/14/2011 6:05:30 AM PDT by Travis McGee (Castigo Cay is in print and on Kindle.)
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To: Conservative Vermont Vet
"My prediction: One day soon, a very prominent person (hopefully a Congress-Critter) will get caught up in one of these incidents with injury/death resulting and then (and only then) will we witness a backlash, calls for hearings and a reigning in of these para-military, Jack-Booted, Fascist, Thugs!"

It's beginning to look like one needs to have IEDs at one's entrances and the willingness to shoot first to take some with you when they wrongly break down your door to start your punishment, deserved or not.

44 posted on 06/14/2011 6:07:50 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: MrB

Both the Sheriff and the local City Police have SWAT teams.


45 posted on 06/14/2011 6:09:09 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Paladin2

The solution to a sheriff that doesn’t understand or fulfill his duty

is to elect another sheriff.


46 posted on 06/14/2011 6:11:08 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
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To: samtheman
End the War on Drugs and you end 90% of the justification for these unspeakable savages. I know they'll come up with other reasons (like unpaid student loans), but taking away the War on Drugs will go a long way towards pulling the carpet out from under their feet.

A classic case of throwing the baby out with the bath water.

Reading Ann Coulter's latest book regarding the "mob", the para-military units that have overrun our police and fire departments (yes, Austin FD has a "Regional Strike Force" and a "Special Operations Battalion") in my opinion, are yet another manifestation of the liberals trying to destroy the system so that We The People no longer trust, rather now detest and are repulsed by government law enforcement.

I wonder how long it will be before we hear of IEDs used routinely as perimeter defense against such offensive police action.

I have no reason to expect such a raid on my home, yet in the event of having to relocate, it is now a security decision to not only know the neighborhood, but also the history of the existing property. For example, say I was to look at some property owned by what appears to be a well compensated executive, if his child was black-sheep or if he himself managed to irritate an OIG over some pittance, even though he has long sold the house and is living in another part of the country, we know that government can't be bothered with any level of recon or simply confirming the address. Do I now have to sleep in clothes suitable for being hog-tied in while out on the front lawn for half the day as thugs ransack the home looking for the previous occupant?

It would seem that architects would have a new specialty to offer, and that is designs of a home that would stymie the thugs efforts to get to the owners and their children quickly, affording the owner time to call for legal representation (since obviously the criminals engaged in the lethal violence against you are on the other end of 911)

Now we can design labyrinth entryways with water features. Master bedrooms as strong rooms. Window designs intended to withstand teargas rounds fired at them, fence work and landscaping designed to injure the fast moving intruder coming at night. Will we need to string up piano wire in our hallways as a inexpensive last resort to protect us from being beaten into a coma, gunned down, or at the least thrown out in the front lawn in something we would never be seen in public?

Your neighbors voted for this demonic crap, now we have to live like Jews in Nazi Germany or Christians in present day Nigeria, or white farmers in Zimbabwe. Its Mogadishu because our politicians hate us and know we hate them, and now have a military guard to protect them and harass us.

47 posted on 06/14/2011 6:12:22 AM PDT by The Theophilus (Obama's Key to win 2012: Ban Haloperidol)
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To: MrB

The Chief of Police in a City is typically appointed. It’d be better if the City did not have a SWAT team.


48 posted on 06/14/2011 6:12:51 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Paladin2

I certainly agree there.
The CoP has to be appointed by an elected person, though.

And I understand, some cities are so ‘rat infested that there’s no way to get a non-corrupt mayor or sheriff elected.

In that case, I’d suggest moving, perhaps to the northwest, away from the concentrated blue cesspools.


49 posted on 06/14/2011 6:15:02 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
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To: Travis McGee
*** In return, the local SWAT serves as a force multiplier for the FLEAs ***

Yep, they use use them like the US Army SF uses a 'force multiplier'. A six man SF 'A Team' can get a MIKE Force (force multiplier) battle ready in a 'relatively' short time (the Hmong were eager 'students').

But the thing is everyone with a TV and a brain knows how SWAT makes 'an entry'. And one person with a shotgun and alternating loads can hold them at bay -- given a few seconds notice.

First comes the verbal 'warrant warning' of entry (open up), 10 seconds later comes the battering ram, then the Flash-Bang. A few seconds later SWAT enters to 'clear the room'.

The 'target' only needs to be ready, and first avert his eyes of the flash from the grenade, then open up with a Buckshot round or two aimed low (legs), then Slug Rounds that'll go through any 'body armor'. Then SWAT will have to retreat. Even a 20ga would do, 12ga not required.

I'm not advising this or any violence against Police. I'm very Pro Police and Law and Order. I'm 'just sayin'.

Waco was a prime example of an entry gone bad.
The Davidians knew what the ATF SWAT Team would do, and they lost two officers in the process.

50 posted on 06/14/2011 6:15:34 AM PDT by Condor51 (The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits [A.Einstein])
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