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Majority Sees U.S. Leadership in Space as Essential
Pew Research Center ^ | 06/30/2011 | n/a

Posted on 07/01/2011 10:17:34 AM PDT by Pyro7480

On the eve of the final mission of the U.S. space shuttle program, most Americans say the United States must be at the forefront of future space exploration. Fifty years after the first American manned space flight, nearly six-in-ten (58%) say it is essential that the United States continue to be a world leader in space exploration; about four-in-ten say this is not essential (38%)....

Majorities in nearly all demographic groups say it is essential that the U.S. continue to be at the vanguard of space exploration. And partisan groups largely agree that American leadership is vital, although this view is more prevalent among Republicans. Two-thirds of Republicans (67%) say the nation must continue to play an international leadership role in space exploration; smaller majorities of Democrats (54%) and independents (57%) say this....

Large majorities say that the space program has helped encourage interest in science, led to scientific advances and contributed to feelings of patriotism....

(Excerpt) Read more at people-press.org ...


TOPICS: Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: nasa; space; spaceshuttle
The Left doesn't want the U.S. to lead in anything, and the space program is just a prominent example.
1 posted on 07/01/2011 10:17:38 AM PDT by Pyro7480
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To: Pyro7480

We indeed lead in space.

After all, nature’s most perfect vacuum - and one in which even quantum events do not occur - is within the Obamaloon’s head.


2 posted on 07/01/2011 10:20:41 AM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: Pyro7480
We've gone from leadership to being that guy in high school whose parents won't let him drive so he's always bumming rides with friends.
3 posted on 07/01/2011 10:24:15 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! Tea Party extremism is a badge of honor.)
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To: Pyro7480

In reality the dems are the party of No. No jobs, no healthy economy, no freedom to chose your own way, no industry, no R&D, no self defense, no private property, no world leadership, no public prayers, etc etc etc. It seems entirely at odds with the Barry Soetoro lie ‘Yes we can!’. It makes you wonder what theyre talking about.

In fact $ spent on space and defense are far more beneficial then that spend on ‘social programs’. In the former it generates a great deal of R&D and need for highly skilled workers. Much of the time those innovations eventually wind up on the consumer market. The later supports the needy from one dole check to the next.


4 posted on 07/01/2011 10:39:55 AM PDT by 556x45
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To: Pyro7480

The July 8th launch is not a celebration, it’s a funeral.


5 posted on 07/01/2011 10:44:15 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (From her lips to the voters' ears: Debbie Wasserman Schultz: "We own the economy" June 15, 2011)
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To: Pyro7480

I am so upset over his.I think this is the first time in my life that we have not had a space program that actually had a way to get into space.I was born in 1960.


6 posted on 07/01/2011 10:45:40 AM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: KarlInOhio
We've gone from leadership to being that guy in high school whose parents won't let him drive so he's always bumming rides with friends.

We've gone from being a nation of pioneers to a nation of settlers.

And it doesn't help that the guy in the White House doesn't understand the concept of how holding the high ground is important.
7 posted on 07/01/2011 10:48:03 AM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: 556x45

Yes they are and people do not understand that.As I’ve been told the newer types of non animal insulins were developed by the space program and some of the research on insulin pump development was part of it too.Those experiments they do touch more of us than people realize.,


8 posted on 07/01/2011 10:48:40 AM PDT by chris_bdba
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To: Pyro7480
The Left doesn't want the U.S. to lead in anything, and the space program is just a prominent example.

It's not just the Left. Establishment politicians from both parties don't like NASA because it doesn't buy enough votes. People who are inspired by space exploration aren't easily bought.

9 posted on 07/01/2011 10:51:39 AM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: chris_bdba
I am so upset over his.I think this is the first time in my life that we have not had a space program that actually had a way to get into space.I was born in 1960.

The only reason our government put so much money into NASA in the 1960's was to counter the space accomplishments of the Soviets.

Our current enemies can do little more than inspire the federal government to turn its resources against the American people.

10 posted on 07/01/2011 10:56:03 AM PDT by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: Pyro7480

Majority Sees U.S. Leadership in Space as Essential

They're blasting the current US Leadership into space? Heck, I'm all for that! :-)
11 posted on 07/01/2011 10:56:06 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (Obama is the least qualified guy in whatever room he walks into.)
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To: Pyro7480

I all for sending our US leaders into space—and leaving them there, especially the Democratic ones.


12 posted on 07/01/2011 10:58:37 AM PDT by Brookhaven (Herman Cain knows computers, math, missiles, banking, burgers, pizza, gospel music, & Coca-Cola)
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To: Pyro7480
The problem I have is that our manned space program has basically become just another pork buffet, delivering consistent billions to targeted Congressional districts despite decades of underperformance.

It's time to start with a clean sheet of paper and get the existing contractors to back away from the trough.

13 posted on 07/01/2011 10:58:57 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: chris_bdba
I think this is the first time in my life that we have not had a space program that actually had a way to get into space.I was born in 1960.

Where were you from 1975 through 1981?

The current gap won't be that long, unless Congress cuts funds for Commercial Crew. Both SpaceX and Boeing will be flying people within three or four years.

14 posted on 07/01/2011 10:59:00 AM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: chris_bdba

I think most folks get tripped up by the class warfare ‘arguments’ and their own lack of critical thought. What has the welfare state ever produced exc new beneficiaries, more squaller and usually high crime rates? There was a time when we knew where we were going. Now we seem to be wandering, undirected (mostly misdirected) and in need of motivation and mission.


15 posted on 07/01/2011 11:01:34 AM PDT by 556x45
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To: Pyro7480
June 30, 2011: Letter From Astronauts and Apollo Veterans Regarding Space Shuttle Retirement and Risk to ISS Operations **** "Congress should request an immediate, 3 week, impartial study and hold emergency hearings on this matter."***

Christopher C. Kraft Former Director of NASA Manned Spaceflight Center Houston, Texas

Scott R. Spencer Transportation Management Consultant Wilmington, Delaware

Endorsed by:

Robert L. Crippen, Pilot STS-1, Commander (STS-7, STS-41C & STS-41G)

Frederick H. Hauck, Pilot STS-7, Commander (STS-51A & STS-26)

Walter Cunningham, LM Pilot, Apollo 7

Neil A. Armstrong, Commander, Apollo 11

James A. Lovell, Jr., Commander, Apollo 13

Eugene A. Cernan, Commander, Apollo 17

Gene Kranz, Director of Mission Operations - Flight Director

Tom Moser, NASA Space Station Program Director

John W. Robinson, Chairman, Space Propulsion Synergy Team

cc: President Barack Obama
Vice President Joseph Biden
U.S. Senator Bill Nelson
U.S. Representative Ralph Hall

16 posted on 07/01/2011 11:03:51 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Pyro7480

Since when has what “the majority of Americans want” mattered?

The majority of Americans want lots of things - a balanced budget, the borders enforced, illegal aliens deported, no gay marriage, no Obamacare, etc...

Who cares what the majority of Americans want??


17 posted on 07/01/2011 11:22:32 AM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded my brains fell out)
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To: Pyro7480
Let's face it; our enemies are going to militarize space. We know they will.
18 posted on 07/01/2011 11:26:15 AM PDT by He Rides A White Horse ((unite))
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

That’s crazy. It would cost billions to resurrect the program, and be at least two years before they could fly again. All Dragon needs is a launch escape system and life support, both under development now.


19 posted on 07/01/2011 11:35:44 AM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum

Not crazy.

What’s happening to the one flying system we have, one that can carry the payload that shuttle can, is crazy. Did you read the letter — their points — the implications?

You’ll be remembering your “two years” scoff.

Bank on it.


20 posted on 07/01/2011 11:41:58 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: NonZeroSum
Keeping the shuttle available for (possible) maintenance on the ISS would definitely maintain the iron rice bowls of thousands of government and contractor employees, even if such a maintenance flight is never ever needed.

Nice work if you can get it.

21 posted on 07/01/2011 11:48:31 AM PDT by Notary Sojac
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To: Notary Sojac

It’s cheap insurance.


22 posted on 07/01/2011 12:02:09 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: KarlInOhio; Paladin2; The_Victor; Carry_Okie; kcvl; steelyourfaith; Ernest_at_the_Beach
We've gone from leadership to being that guy in high school whose parents won't let him drive so he's always bumming rides with friends.

It's worse than that. He's a guy who can't drive because he spends his time telling the principal that everybody else is using too much CO2, and trying to make Muslims feel better about their contributions to science.

23 posted on 07/01/2011 12:26:03 PM PDT by ding_dong_daddy_from_dumas (Budget sins can be fixed. Amnesty is irreversible.)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Of course I read it. They are clueless. There is no way in the world that we could have new tanks next year. Three years ago it sort of made sense to discuss keeping the Shuttle flying, but that horse left the barn then, and many, including Wayne Hale, noted the point of no return at the time.

We retired Shuttle for a reason (more than one, actually). Those reasons don’t go away just because a lot of Apollo/Shuttle veterans write a politically and programmatically clueless letter.


24 posted on 07/01/2011 3:16:05 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
It’s cheap insurance.

It is insurance, but it is certainly not "cheap' insurance. It would cost billions, we'd have to keep the work force standing around forgetting how to process orbiters for the two or three years it would take to get the first ET off the line, and NASA doesn't have the budget. It will be much more cost effective to stand up the commercial providers more quickly, which can happen for a fraction of the cost of trying to keep Shuttle alive.

25 posted on 07/01/2011 3:19:00 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum

You’re the clueless one but then the clueless are just, well, so clueless.


26 posted on 07/01/2011 3:19:48 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: NonZeroSum

You really can’t see the big picture, can you?


27 posted on 07/01/2011 3:22:21 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I’m pretty sure that you’re the one not seeing the “big picture,” which includes a wide array of cost-effective and redundant means to solve this problem to which those who are totally focused on the Shuttle are apparently blind.


28 posted on 07/01/2011 3:26:01 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum

See, there you go assuming.

It’s not “about” the shuttle.

I guess you didn’t read their letter for content.

Unfortunately so many “experts” can’t think strategically or tactically and that’s why we’re in this mess. The most interesting thing about being told by “experts” what I know and don’t know is that they’re the same ones who have brought us to this point and have the nerve (stupidity?) to brag about it.

“There are none so blind as those who will not see.”


29 posted on 07/01/2011 3:38:21 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I did read their letter for comprehension (not sure what “for content” means).

They are concerned about being able to deal with an emergency at the ISS. Their solution (keeping Shuttle going) is politically, budgetarily and programatically unrealistic, and there are ways to deal with those sorts of issues sooner, and for much less money. The fact that they think they can wave a wand and somehow have new tanks magically appear next year, and the fact that they ignore the capabilities of the ISS arm, Soyuz, Dragon, Boeing’s CST to do these sorts of operations doesn’t make them magically go away.

It is a letter of not thought, but emotion — mindless panic, and a fear of letting go of the familiar.


30 posted on 07/01/2011 3:44:47 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum
....The fact that they think they can wave a wand and somehow have new tanks magically appear next year, and the fact that they ignore the capabilities of the ISS arm, Soyuz, Dragon, Boeing’s CST to do these sorts of operations doesn’t make them magically go away.

It is a letter of not thought, but emotion...

And what have you done?

These men understand engineering, history and the reality of the situation.

Because of their "emotion" and their "thoughts" and AND their deeds, I salute them.

Go ahead and have the last word. Somehow it seems fitting.

31 posted on 07/01/2011 11:34:10 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
And what have you done?

What I've "done" is to actually study, and familiarize myself with the issues.

These men understand engineering, history and the reality of the situation.

If that letter is any evidence, they apparently don't. Regardless of their life achievements and experience, while they are entitled to their own opinions, they aren't entitled to their own facts. I'm happy to salute them for their deeds, but that doesn't make that letter correct. And to think it does isn't logical at all. It's a fallacy called "Appeal to authority."

32 posted on 07/02/2011 12:56:11 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum
"And what have you done?"

What I've "done" is to actually study, and familiarize myself with the issues.

That's it?

33 posted on 07/02/2011 1:03:44 PM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Yes. That’s it. It is sufficient. Particularly since they obviously have not.

I don’t care whether or not someone walked on the moon — if they tell me two and two are five, I’m going to (politely) tell them they are mistaken.


34 posted on 07/02/2011 8:40:34 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum
Yes. That’s it. It is sufficient. Particularly since they obviously have not.

Thank you for letting everyone know what an arrogant, self promoting, no-nothing you are.

35 posted on 07/03/2011 5:15:17 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
Thank you for letting everyone know what an arrogant, self promoting, no-nothing you are.

I don't think anyone knows that except illogical people like you. And you apparently know many other things that aren't so. It's one of the reasons that space policy is such a mess.

36 posted on 07/03/2011 6:47:27 AM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I have to say, it’s particularly hilarious to be accused of “self promoting” when I post under a pseudonym, and to be accused of being a “no-nothing” [sic] by someone who doesn’t even know how to spell “know-nothing.”


37 posted on 07/03/2011 12:46:12 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: Pyro7480

Which president signed the UN Space treaty that killed our space program and gave us the international boondoogle wealth redistribution project, the international space station?

It was Lyndon B Johnson!

President Lyndon B. Johnson’s
Remarks at the Signing of the Treaty on Outer Space.
January 27, 1967

Secretary Rusk, Mr. Vice President, Mr. Chief Justice, Your Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen:

This is an inspiring moment in the history of the human race.

We are taking the first firm step toward keeping outer space free forever from the implements of war.

It was more than 400 years ago when Martin Luther said:

“Cannons and firearms are cruel and damnable machines. I believe them to have been the direct suggestion of the devil. If Adam had seen in a vision the horrible instruments that his children were to invent, he would have died of grief.”

Well, I wonder what he would have thought of the far more terrible weapons that we have today.

We have never succeeded in freeing our planet from the implements of war. But if we cannot yet achieve this goal here on earth, we can at least keep the virus from spreading.

We can keep the ugly and wasteful weapons of mass destruction from contaminating space. And that is exactly what this treaty does.

This treaty means that the moon and our sister planets will serve only the purposes of peace and not of war.

It means that orbiting man-made satellites will remain free of nuclear weapons.

It means that astronaut and cosmonaut will meet someday on the surface of the moon as brothers and not as warriors for competing nationalities or ideologies.

It holds promise that the same wisdom and good will which gave us this space treaty will continue to guide us as we seek solutions to the many problems that we have here on this earth.

It is a hopeful and a very promising sign.

We are so pleased that we could be joined here today by the representatives of so many of the other nations of the world.

I now take great pleasure in presenting to you our distinguished Secretary of State—Mr. Dean Rusk.

On February 7, 1967, the President transmitted the treaty to the Senate (see Item 38). It was favorably considered by the Senate on April 25, 1967. The text of the treaty is printed in Senate Executive D (90th Cong., 1st sess.).

Source: Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967. Volume I, entry 18, pp. 91-92. Washington, D. C.: Government Printing Office, 1968.


38 posted on 07/03/2011 12:59:23 PM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: hedgetrimmer

Johnson signed the Outer Space Treaty, but that had absolutely nothing to do with the International Space Station.


39 posted on 07/03/2011 11:33:18 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum

Yes it did.

It established ‘international space law’, with the UN as the legislative and governing body.

Thus empowered, the UN then produced the ‘five declarations’ on outer space, one of which was the ‘international cooperation’ read wealth and technology redistribution, to poor countries who couldn’t afford to go to space, i.e. the international space station.


40 posted on 07/04/2011 7:11:10 AM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: hedgetrimmer

That still has nothing to do with ISS. In fact, the ISS partners are not “poor countries who couldn’t afford to go to space.”


41 posted on 07/05/2011 9:37:29 AM PDT by NonZeroSum
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To: NonZeroSum

So you are a global wealth redistributionist then?


42 posted on 07/05/2011 4:20:29 PM PDT by hedgetrimmer
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To: hedgetrimmer
to continue:

It also means that no corporate fat cats will ever be able to capitalize on any new technology they invent, since that technology will instantly become property of the United Nations.

It also means that corporate fat cats who begin manned space ventures will never go beyond Low Earth Orbit, since every thing beyond that belongs to the United Nations.

It means that the United States of America will never ever put weapons into space, no matter how many other countries do so. We have so claimed the higher moral ground.

It means that when astronauts and cosmonauts will meet someday on the surface of the moon as brothers and not as warriors for competing nationalities or ideologies, under the banners of Crescent and Star or the Red Star.

It means that the United States of America will be able one day to cede all manned space exploration to more worthy countries.

It means that by signing of this wondrous treaty the United States will begin it's true path toward full navel contemplation as a rising third world socialist nation, whose population will clamor for more free stuff from government.

As your President, I can assure you that I and my colleges will do everything in our power to spend as much money as possible on free stuff, thus ensuring that the United States will never again have enough money to pursue these foolish and wasteful manned space ventures.

I can assure you my fellow Americans that when proponents of continuing manned space ventures raises it's head in the future, that the hue and cry will go up that we have no money, space is just rocks dust and radiation.

At this time I can announce to you that I have killed the last remnants of one of those damnable machines which proponents wanted to bring to fruition powered by the very terrible weapons we are hereby outlawing in space with this Treaty. Project Orion is officially dead.

They went around saying crazy things like: Mars by 1965. Saturn by 1970. Can you imagine what a terrible waste of money that would have been?

43 posted on 07/05/2011 4:58:18 PM PDT by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
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To: hedgetrimmer
So you are a global wealth redistributionist then?

No, that would be a nutty assumption.

I am simply someone who is familiar with space policy and space history. For what it's worth, I think that we should renegotiate the Outer Space Treaty, because it makes property rights in space problematic, but it's also nutty to think that it has anything to do with ISS. The OST doesn't require international space stations, and the ISS didn't need the OST. It is international for reasons having nothing to do with the OST.

44 posted on 07/05/2011 5:49:06 PM PDT by NonZeroSum
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