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Texas: Mandatory meningitis shots for all newly enrolling college students
Austin American-Statesman ^ | August 20, 2011 | Andrea Ball

Posted on 08/21/2011 1:57:51 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

Starting in January, newly enrolling students in public or private colleges under age 30 will be required to be vaccinated for meningitis.

The recently passed law targets all first-time and transfer students. Students can opt out of the requirement for health, religious or other reasons, but they need to file paperwork to do so. Students enrolled at online universities are also exempted.

With than 1 million Texans enrolled in higher education programs, the law is expected to affect several hundred thousand people across the state,..

Now colleges are increasing their efforts to make sure students get their shots and get into class on time...

Meningitis is an inflammation of the protective covering of the brain and spinal cord. The disease can lead to brain damage, seizures, coma, organ failure and death.

In 2009 , there were 336 confirmed cases of bacterial meningitis in Texas, the Department of State Health Services reports. Fourteen of those were in Travis County.

...."Eventually, this is going to be routine, one other step in enrollment," Christensen said. "But it's always difficult to change the culture, and we don't want students to suffer because of this."

Although insurance plans usually cover the cost of immunization, those without coverage may have trouble paying for a meningitis shot, which can cost more than $100, Mercer said. So administrators plan to connect students with local health clinics, nonprofits and other entities, which offer the shots for as little as $10.....

(Excerpt) Read more at statesman.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government
KEYWORDS: healthcare; meningitis; shots; vaccines

1 posted on 08/21/2011 1:58:04 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Governor Gardisil strikes again!

Sarah, please save us!


2 posted on 08/21/2011 2:02:21 AM PDT by PastorBooks
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To: All
December 23, 2009: New Law Requiring Meningitis Vaccine For Dorm Residents Inspired By UT Student

........>>>Schanbaum was living alone in a North Campus apartment [Nov 2008] when she contracted the rapid-spreading disease. She had not been vaccinated.

The Daily Texan reported on her plight, which resulted in the amputation of both legs and six of her fingers. Schanbaum is now back at UT regaining her independence through the use of prosthetics. Earlier this month, she blogged a quick recap of her last year: from pleading with doctors to save as much of her limbs as possible last December to driving and walking to class today.

“This disease progresses extremely rapidly,” Sherry Bell, a spokeswoman for University Health Services, told the Daily Texan at the time. “You can be well one day and dead the next.”

Schanbaum and her family lobbied for the bacterial meningitis vaccine to be required rather than just recommended, as it was under a current law. After coming up in several previous legislative sessions, the act was finally put into law in part because of the Schanbaums’ efforts.

First-year residents now will be protected against four of the five most common strains of meningitis, although health officials point out that the vaccine is not 100 percent effective.<<<..........

November 14, 2010:

Jamie Schanbaum, who lost limbs to meningococcal septicemia, learns to ride bicycle

3 posted on 08/21/2011 2:08:54 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
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To: PastorBooks

The law was inspired by two recent students. One of them died and one had her fingers and legs below the knee amputated as a result of this disease. Please read an article before you comment.


4 posted on 08/21/2011 2:14:42 AM PDT by Essie
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
There will be more Perry-flamers from this. I did a quick check and found that those hitting college age are most susceptible to meningitis and Meningococcal vaccination is required to attend many colleges. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) suggests that your child receive the vaccine less than 5 years before starting school.

I haven't looked up side-effects, etc., but it is recommended for the population at-large as they pass though certain ages.

5 posted on 08/21/2011 2:53:15 AM PDT by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: Essie; PastorBooks
The law was inspired by two recent students. One of them died and one had her fingers and legs below the knee amputated as a result of this disease. Please read an article before you comment.

While what you say is true, it doesn't excuse the stupidity of a law that takes freedom of choice away from free citizens. Meningitis hurts the person that contracts it and no one else. It is contracted in several ways, one of them being using a dirty needle while doing drugs. You can also get it by eating food that has been fertilized with human excrement.

Here's the deal, it is not the governments, or the school's, concern or business whether students are vaccinated or not.

Why not have them vaccinated for everything, require them to wear raincoats and rubber over shoes when the weather is bad?

6 posted on 08/21/2011 3:00:09 AM PDT by calex59
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I’m amazed that so many adults wouldn’t have had the meningitis vaccine. When we lived in Texas (many years before Perry, before anyone flips out) the state had quite stringent vaccine requirements. Our Texas-born children got more shots than all the rest, and that was before Anoreth started going to the World’s Pestilential Places!


7 posted on 08/21/2011 3:27:56 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There is only one remedy for ignorance and thoughtlessness, and that is literacy." R. Mitchell)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife
As long as the “opt-out” provision is well publicized and made as simple (hopefully the “must file paperwork” is not the typical bureaucratic hair-pulling hassle) as possible—then I have no problem with the BIG GOVERNMENT COMMANDMENT—cause it's the business of the Texans and apparently Texas, led by it's GOVERNOR, is becoming a BIG GOVERNMENT STATE. But hey,you know,what with the 10th Amendment and all—I reckon that's FINE with me;)
8 posted on 08/21/2011 3:41:28 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("11/4/2008: The day America elected a pyromaniac in the middle of a fire storm.")
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I was a military brat. I had vaccinations for Yellow Fever, cholera, polio, Typhoid, meningitis, and many others. Then, I enlisted in the military. I have two shot records that have no place to enter any new vaccinations. I don’t see any problem with a vaccination for a disease that is real and an inherent risk. Unfortunately, I did receive an experimental vaccine while I was in the USAF that had some dire consequences for the 1000 of us that were in the group.


9 posted on 08/21/2011 3:50:24 AM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

My daughter had to get this before she went to school in VA.

I actually think this is a good idea, I worked with a girl who had almost died of meningitis while in college.

Dorm living is the type of environment that is conducive to this disease, why, I forget, but it is.

Gardisil is entirely different, HPV is not just floating around in the air.

We need to consider all vaccines carefully, but the fact is that whooping cough and other horrors are on the rise in some places. And it’s not just the unvacinated immigrants, it’s also the soccer moms who aren’t getting their kids the “jab” as the Brits say.


10 posted on 08/21/2011 3:57:24 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: jocon307; Cincinatus' Wife

11 posted on 08/21/2011 4:23:58 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There is only one remedy for ignorance and thoughtlessness, and that is literacy." R. Mitchell)
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To: Tax-chick

My daughter got “doored” on her bicycle a few years ago and got cut up by glass in the street. She was (thank the Lord!) OK, but she had to get a bunch of stitches.

I called her pediatrician and found out she hadn’t gotten the most recent tetnus booster, why? I don’t know.

Anyway, I made the ER doc give her a tetnus shot. He said, she probably doesn’t really need it, I’m not big on giving a lot of shots. He was fine, I’m not complaining about him. But I said, I want her to have it. So, he gave it to her.

OTOH, I know a woman whose daughter had a LOT of problems from, I think, the measles vaccine. It was sort of like the poor kid had mini-measles all the time.

I think you have to weigh all aspects. How bad is the disease? How contagious is the disease? What are the side effects of the vaccine?

You’ve really got to watch out for the Guillian-Barre syndrome as a side effect. I THINK that may be a potential side effect of Gardisil, it is part of the disclaimer for some new med that is being advertised on TV. You don’t want to get THAT, or even run any risk of it. I’d rather take my chances with pretty much anything else.


12 posted on 08/21/2011 4:37:33 AM PDT by jocon307
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

So the criticism of Governor Perry is that he takes recommendations from medical professionals so as to protect the health of Texas’ children.

If he had failed to do so - that would be the criticism du jour.


13 posted on 08/21/2011 4:42:15 AM PDT by sodpoodle (Despair: Man's surrender. Laughter: God's redemption.)
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To: PastorBooks

what happened to declining based on ‘personal’ belief? there is a HUGE movement out there against any and all vaccinations based on personal belief.


14 posted on 08/21/2011 4:44:07 AM PDT by television is just wrong
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

360? out of millioins? have had menengitis? that is pretty low because that is probably the death rate from the vaccine.


15 posted on 08/21/2011 4:45:26 AM PDT by television is just wrong
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Is this a relatively new problem for Texas universities? Is it because of illegal aliens attending said schools?


16 posted on 08/21/2011 4:49:49 AM PDT by Scotsman will be Free (11C - Indirect fire, infantry - High angle hell - We will bring you, FIRE)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Does the military require this inoculation?
******

State laws vary
According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, half of all states require the meningitis vaccine for college students. Louisiana is among a handful of states that also mandate the shot for middle-school students. Texas requires only distribution of information about meningitis by school districts and colleges.
Ana’s death reminded Frankie Milley of her own family’s heartbreak. She lost her only child, 18-year-old Ryan, to meningitis in 1998.

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Meningitis-vaccine-may-cost-but-some-say-it-s-1762256.php

*********
Seventh-graders must have had a meningitis vaccine and a second dose of varicella (chicken pox survivors excluded).

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Clock-is-ticking-for-kids-to-get-new-vaccine-shots-1614211.php


17 posted on 08/21/2011 5:00:54 AM PDT by deport ( In Texas it's hotter than two goats fighting in a jalapeno patch.)
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To: calex59
This is not a law that takes freedom of choice from free citizens. This is a law that the legislature of Texas and the governor of Texas decided to pass to address what they saw as an issue. The state has a duty to address public health issues. Does that restrict freedom? Yes, every law restricts freedom. If you, as a free citizen, do not like this, then move to another state or don't enroll in a college in the state of Texas. Or, you can opt out.

There are many things Gov Perry has done that I see as questioning his conservative credentials. This is not one.

18 posted on 08/21/2011 5:09:21 AM PDT by BruceS (If you refuse to support the lesser of two evils, then you are supporting the greater of two evils.)
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To: BruceS

As the state of Florida vs. HHS (Obamacare lawsuit with 26 states)
shows us

STATES HAVE GENERAL POLICE POWER under our separation of powers
constitutional republic.
YET the federal government does not have general police power.
President obama wants all kind of power.

Now what you DO with the state power is another matter.
Vaccines are general police power -— see Massachusetts in the
US Supreme COurt decision in 1920s

Mitt Romney went along with an individual mandate. Loss of freedom,
privacy for what benefit?


19 posted on 08/21/2011 5:21:33 AM PDT by preamble
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To: PastorBooks

You have a full blown case of Perry Derangement Syndrome. Might want to get it looked at.


20 posted on 08/21/2011 5:29:33 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: BruceS

“There are many things Gov Perry has done that I see as questioning his conservative credentials. This is not one.”

I’m with you...as far as I can tell right now about this disease. Anyone that saw my postings last weekend knows that I don’t hesitate to let people know what I think of my governor. In this case, the legislature passed it first. In the case of Gardasil, Perry could have requested the same, had the debate, and ACCEPTED the results...good or bad...and he would also have been off the hook, as far as I’m concerned.

It’s when an executive starts acting like a dictator that I get angry. For example, Obama is in the process of shutting down 10% of this country’s electricity production...no debate, just shut it down. North Korea had the same problem with electricity and they ended up in famine.


21 posted on 08/21/2011 5:35:53 AM PDT by BobL (PLEASE READ: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2657811/posts)
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To: calex59

While you’re at it, get yourself a damned vaccination so you don’t bring your KRAP TO MY CHILD! Or are YOU not responsible enough to do it? Yeah, you’re not responsible enough to do it on your own!

First of all there is an opt out in Texas FOR ANY IMMUNIZATION that you deem dangerous to yourself or your child in consultation with your doctor.

FOOLS get others killed, their hands and legs cut off, or perhaps bring death to yours kids.


22 posted on 08/21/2011 5:39:02 AM PDT by RowdyFFC
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Didn’t Sarah Palin come out in opposition to mandatory vaccinations for chicken pox? Which, I assume, would also mean opposition to any vaccination requirements mandated by state or federal government?


23 posted on 08/21/2011 5:49:16 AM PDT by SoJoCo
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Since we don’t know how long immunity lasts for any vaccine, I recommend those who approve of them to go to their doctor and get shot up. If you’re complaining about people not being vaccinated keep in mind you’re probably no longer immune to these diseases either.


24 posted on 08/21/2011 6:18:17 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: SoJoCo
That's because the chicken pox vaccine is a crock. As the mother of a three-year-old, I already know several children that received the vaccine and still got chicken pox. Now their pediatricians are saying that they need the booster. So they were vaccinated, it didn't work, and now the children should get an extra dose. I think the new CDC vaccine schedule recommends the booster now for all children. If the vaccine is so great, why do kids need a booster? The second problem is that we have no idea how long any vaccine immunity lasts; therefore, once the vaccine is no longer effective the person will be susceptible to chicken pox. Adults have a much higher chance of dying from chicken pox than children. Finally, there are no chicken pox vaccines in the U.S. that are free from the use of aborted babies. You can check that out here: http://www.cogforlife.org/fetalvaccines.htm

Considering Sarah's strong pro-life stand, my last statement is probably why she is opposed to mandatory chicken pox vaccines.

25 posted on 08/21/2011 6:25:23 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife; All

Very interesting. Thanks for posting and thanks to all posters.


26 posted on 08/21/2011 6:34:37 AM PDT by PGalt
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To: onyx
Ping to #2
27 posted on 08/21/2011 6:36:24 AM PDT by newzjunkey
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To: calex59

Public health has walked the fine line between public freedom and, well, public health.

People screamed when they were forced to pay for closed sewers. Then they screamed when public wells were tested and many were closed. The food industry complained when standards for contamination were put in place. There are even people that grumble about being forced to wash their hands before making your hamburger.

The simple underlying science of immunization is that for an individual, an immunization provides marginal protection. If you immunize the entire susceptible group, you can get virtually 100% protection. Thus there is a balance, does your individual right to choose over ride the right of your fellow citizen’s right not to develop the disease?

This is not even a simple liberal vs conservative argument if you think about it. It is a libertarian argument, does the social contract give the government any rights to control individual behavior? If you agree that the government has any rights to control individual behavior, then the public health argument changes.

With that out of the way, your basic understanding of this type of meningitis is deficient. It is a bacterial infection that is spread much like a cold. A portion of people that get exposed never develop illness but develop a colonization in their nasal mucous membranes and expose people to the disease for an extended period of time. Because of their age and living arrangements, college students and military recruits are at greatly increased risk for this disease. And there is a reason why not to force them to be immunized to everything, public health is a balance between private rights, the public’s health and resources available.

How many people here think it would have been a good idea to immediately shut down the bath houses in San Francisco when AIDS was first identified? How many people here think it is a good idea to let the homosexuals back into the public blood supply? There is at least some willingness here to let the government interfere with individuals to improve public health. Unless you feel that individual rights are only “good for me and not for thee” then public health should be an ongoing debate rather than thrown out and just an infringement of rights.


28 posted on 08/21/2011 7:00:29 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: goodwithagun

But she is on record as saying, “I would not propose govt mandating anything like shots for our kids.” Chicken Pox, meningitis, polio, Hep A or Hep B, tetanus, diphtheria, apparently nothing that the medical community has recommended should be required by law.


29 posted on 08/21/2011 7:08:24 AM PDT by SoJoCo
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To: jocon307
I think you have to weigh all aspects. How bad is the disease? How contagious is the disease? What are the side effects of the vaccine?

I agree. However, the success of almost-universal vaccination in many countries made people way too complacent about how bad many diseases are, and how contagious they are. And tort-lawyers and ideologues have made the risks of many vaccines appear much greater than they are. People need to make decisions using *good* information, not celebrity appearances on talk shows and wishful thinking.

We Scout leaders (and Scouts) have to keep our tetanus boosters up to date to participate.

30 posted on 08/21/2011 7:29:28 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There is only one remedy for ignorance and thoughtlessness, and that is literacy." R. Mitchell)
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To: newzjunkey

“You have a full blown case of Perry Derangement Syndrome.”

You betcha!

Nothing to worry about. Sarah will be along soon.


31 posted on 08/21/2011 7:33:41 AM PDT by PastorBooks
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

Some adverse reactions to the vaccine is imminent. Some could be life long problems, and others could be life threatening.

Big brother doesn’t care.


32 posted on 08/21/2011 7:45:54 AM PDT by chainsaw (I'd hate to be a democrat running against Sarah Palin.)
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To: Essie; All
"The law was inspired" (and by victim's parents). I would still ask 'why a LAW? Why not the 'paperwork' to get the vaccine - so one can make a thoughtful choice; rather than having students having to make extra effort for exemption?

Would ask as well, if all staff and faculty required to have this inoculation. High school students and younger are as likely to contract this; am guessing they will come into 'focus' later.

Would suggest that those 'less skeptical' read "Dr. Mary and the Monkey"/Edward Haslan OR just 'search' Simeon Virus 40 ( SV 40) on the net.

What happened here is a tragedy; but a 'law' - much less, one requiring a questionable vaccine - is no antidote.

33 posted on 08/21/2011 8:02:18 AM PDT by cricket (Osama - NOT made in the USA. . . .and Obama, not madhttp://atlasshrugs2000e in the USA either.. .)
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To: PastorBooks

Governor Gardisil strikes again!

Sarah, please save us!

*****

Government is sometimes correct to require immunization. Would any loving, rational parent want his child to die from contacting a disease from a classmate who was not vaccinated? Soldiers are required to get shots so they won’t spread diseases to each other as they work and fight in close contact with each other — do you have a problem with that? Granted, the use of Gardisil has some moral implications, so I can understand why some libertarians and conservatives would object to it. But we shouldn’t call Perry “Governor Gardisil” just because he wants to protect college students from a terrible disease.


34 posted on 08/21/2011 8:06:19 AM PDT by Socon-Econ (Socon-Econ)
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To: Essie

Nothing anyone with good sense can say will ever convince these libertarian paul-types to use common sense, even if they are shouting SARAH.


35 posted on 08/21/2011 8:43:08 AM PDT by dusttoyou ("Progressives" are wee-weeing all over themselves, Foc nobama)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife

I have no problem with this vaccination; my daughter had to get the shot before beginning college in Virginia. It’s much different from forcing everyone to get the Gardasil vaccine.


36 posted on 08/21/2011 2:41:03 PM PDT by ContraryMary (Obama = Carter redux)
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