Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Why Amazon Can't Make A Kindle In the USA
Forbes ^ | 8/17/2011 | Steve Denning

Posted on 08/24/2011 10:45:19 AM PDT by Dick Holmes

How whole industries disappear

Take the story of Dell Computer [DELL] and its Taiwanese electronics manufacturer. The story is told in the brilliant book by Clayton Christensen, Jerome Grossman and Jason Hwang, The Innovator’s Prescription :

ASUSTeK started out making the simple circuit boards within a Dell computer. Then ASUSTeK came to Dell with an interesting value proposition: “We’ve been doing a good job making these little boards. Why don’t you let us make the motherboard for you? Circuit manufacturing isn’t your core competence anyway and we could do it for 20% less.”

Dell accepted the proposal because from a perspective of making money, it made sense: Dell’s revenues were unaffected and its profits improved significantly. On successive occasions, ASUSTeK came back and took over the motherboard, the assembly of the computer, the management of the supply chain and the design of the computer. In each case Dell accepted the proposal because from a perspective of making money, it made sense: Dell’s revenues were unaffected and its profits improved significantly. However, the next time ASUSTeK came back, it wasn’t to talk to Dell. It was to talk to Best Buy and other retailers to tell them that they could offer them their own brand or any brand PC for 20% lower cost. As The Innovator’s Prescription concludes:

Bingo. One company gone, another has taken its place. There’s no stupidity in the story. The managers in both companies did exactly what business school professors and the best management consultants would tell them to do—improve profitability by focus on on those activities that are profitable and by getting out of activities that are less profitable.

(Excerpt) Read more at forbes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: economy; jobs; management; mercantilism
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-75 next last
The author is pushing the idea that there is something wrong with the way American companies are managed, stemming from the simplistic calculus of pursuit of short-term profit without looking at the bigger picture.

I came across this series of articles reading up on HP's decision to get out of the laptop business. In that case, they calculate that home computers, though a third of their business, are not as profitable as other segments, so they should cut them loose. HP is being stupid, IMO. Besides the free advertising they get from having HP consumer products at home and in the office in constant use, they are going to lose their buying power for components they will need for specialty products they think they would make higher margins on.

1 posted on 08/24/2011 10:45:22 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

this is absolutely classical Business School Thinking (the stuff they teach you when you take an MBA). It is all based on the short-term, quick hit, maximize our near-term value.
Companies were not run like this for the first 200 yrs of our Republic until MBA programs started popping up like mushrooms.


2 posted on 08/24/2011 10:48:22 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog

...toadstools.


3 posted on 08/24/2011 10:51:42 AM PDT by null and void (Day 943 of America's holiday from reality...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

Focusing on the short term is one of the best ways to ensure you won’t have to deal with the long term.


4 posted on 08/24/2011 10:53:11 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

On the other paw, I work for (and I suspect millions of other Americans work for) companies without which manufacturing ties in asia would mean we’d simply be out of business also. So I guess you’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.


5 posted on 08/24/2011 10:54:46 AM PDT by bkepley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes; NationalSpotlight

Does ANYONE in FR Land know of ANY example of ANY Union having a positive impact on the USA Economy in this century ?


6 posted on 08/24/2011 10:56:20 AM PDT by Graewoulf
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sherman Logan

I like that, but the way things are set up, the stockholders might punish you for NOT thinking short term. So will the voters, for pols, so they all do.


7 posted on 08/24/2011 10:58:07 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes; ding_dong_daddy_from_dumas; stephenjohnbanker; DoughtyOne; calcowgirl; Gilbo_3; ...
RE :"Dell accepted the proposal because from a perspective of making money, it made sense: Dell’s revenues were unaffected and its profits improved significantly. On successive occasions, ASUSTeK came back and took over the motherboard, the assembly of the computer, the management of the supply chain and the design of the computer. In each case Dell accepted the proposal because from a perspective of making money, it made sense: Dell’s revenues were unaffected and its profits improved significantly. However, the next time ASUSTeK came back, it wasn’t to talk to Dell. It was to talk to Best Buy and other retailers to tell them that they could offer them their own brand or any brand PC for 20% lower cost. As The Innovator’s Prescription concludes:.....Bingo. One company gone, another has taken its place. There’s no stupidity in the story. The managers in both companies did exactly what business school professors and the best management consultants would tell them to do—improve profitability by focus on on those activities that are profitable and by getting out of activities that are less profitable."

In theory American companies cannot do this without the Federal governments permission, Federal Export Laws that regulates the control of shared information from US to other countries. ASUSTeK must have got some design information from Dell given the story above.

If the US government is too stingy with permission it can backfire too as companies go bankrupt, it's a worthwhile problem to try to correct.

8 posted on 08/24/2011 10:58:57 AM PDT by sickoflibs (Obama :"We all were undocumented workers once")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

A union’s purpose is not to address issues with the economy, but with working conditions and such. No doubt life is better for the worker now than 100+ years ago. The problem is that they, like civil rights folks, have outlived their usefulness.


9 posted on 08/24/2011 10:58:57 AM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

You mean in the past 10 years or so? Nope.


10 posted on 08/24/2011 10:59:42 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog
Back in the late 70s, right after I earned my MBA and got back into engineering, I tried unsuccessfully to convince my company, a battery manufacturer, that we needed to vertically integrate by making our own battery cans and sleeves, but the bean-counters had the company president convinced it was cheaper in the short-term to keep a half a dozen other companies in business instead.

I don't know if that company is still manufacturing batteries in the US. I rather doubt it.

11 posted on 08/24/2011 11:00:07 AM PDT by Redleg Duke ("Madison, Wisconsin is 30 square miles surrounded by reality.", L. S. Dryfus)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

HP is not being stupid at all. Laptops and desktop computers will go the way of the VHS tape.

The new tablet stuff has rendered them obsolete and as the tablets become more powerful there will be no need for personal computers as we understand them, outside of core infrastructure.


12 posted on 08/24/2011 11:01:08 AM PDT by Ouderkirk (Democrats...the party of Slavery, Segregation, Sodomy, and Sedition)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes
Decades of outsourcing manufacturing have left U.S. industry without the means to invent the next generation of high-tech products that are key to rebuilding its economy,

Yes, but we do have REALLY GOOD trial lawyers, Gov't regulators, and community organizers....

13 posted on 08/24/2011 11:01:56 AM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded my brains fell out)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk

I’ve not used a tablet myself, but it seems more an entertainment curiosity to me. Maybe others can give some insights i don’t have.


14 posted on 08/24/2011 11:04:16 AM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: DonaldC

Not sure how we got on the topic of unions. I thought the topic was about management strategies. Unions are not the force they once were, in the private sector these days.


15 posted on 08/24/2011 11:04:19 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

I’ve ragged on this for 20+ years to anyone that would listen. The problem with most companies is that they let the bean counters run them, and the bean counters are present oriented.

An example: the was a local factory that, to make their profits look good at corporate, made no investments in equipment. They were a liquid chemical factory with lots of piping that was literally duct taped together. They constantly did a boom bust as they fixed their machines just enough to do a big production run and then they’d blow something and be down.

Old manager finally retires, new manager comes in. He sees how threadbare things are - and very dangerous - and commits capital to upgrading. Corporate is ticked, profits are down, they question his job, and he finally explains that ‘profits were so good because my predecessor spent no money for upkeep’. He kept his job only because they weren’t OSHA spec and a major work hazard that HAD to be fixed.

Typical American corporate thinking. We don’t understand that investment and innovation is leverage and the present value is greater than if there were none all, even if it requires an up front hit to profit.


16 posted on 08/24/2011 11:04:58 AM PDT by Free Vulcan (Obama/Biden '12: No hope and chump change.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes
I've been using Asus motherboards for years. When my wife wanted to buy a whole machine built by Asus, I had no problem. They make a good product. Dell isnt' completely out of the business. I have a new Dell laptop coming around September 14th as a replacement for the 2003 vintage Dell desktop machine I've using at this moment.
17 posted on 08/24/2011 11:06:46 AM PDT by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

ASUS gets my money quite frequently. They are far and away one of the best manufacturers of gaming motherboards.

I have an ASUS mobo, TPM chip (actually Infineon mfg), and 27” monitor by them, and I’ve never had a problem with the equipment or support.

This article just shows me that the Asian chip manufacturers are ahead of the curve. I am leaning heavily against profitable American manufacturing of semiconductors and chips since unions usually demand astronomically higher salaries for less work than the Chicomms can accomplish.


18 posted on 08/24/2011 11:09:44 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk
Tablets are fine for the end user. I'm a software/hardware developer. I need to keyboard/mouse, big screen, large RAM and large disk to do my job. What I produce may well end up on a tablet target, but that is a piss poor device to use for development.
19 posted on 08/24/2011 11:09:44 AM PDT by Myrddin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes
After Congress, the most dangerous influence on this country's prosperity is the Harvard business School and its graduates.
20 posted on 08/24/2011 11:10:01 AM PDT by I am Richard Brandon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

“So Dell, where do you see yourself in the economy in the next five years?”

Standard interview question these momo’s will ask everyone who wants a job there, and can’t answer it themselves.

If anyone thinks the desktop/laptop/notebook is going away anytime soon, they’re mistaken.

You are just going to see more special purpose computing in more places.


21 posted on 08/24/2011 11:10:55 AM PDT by RinaseaofDs (Does beheading qualify as 'breaking my back', in the Jeffersonian sense of the expression?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sickoflibs

That’s not quite right if you are refering to ITAR? The ITAR regulations are for transfer of defence sensitive information. In the case of Dell, yes they were required to make a disclosure through channels, but once no defence sensitive information was determined to be included, out it goes.

So. To get back into the biz, one needs to come up with a way to pull 20% off ASUSTeK...

Figure that out, and YOU win.


22 posted on 08/24/2011 11:12:30 AM PDT by Freeport (The proper application of high explosives will remove all obstacles.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk

I do not agree about desktops. Developers and gamers need
to be able to replace the major subsystems (memory, video options, HDD) and need to support big memory hogging apps.

Try running MS Developer Studio or SoftImage on a tablet
and you will discover that workstations will be with us for the forseeable future.


23 posted on 08/24/2011 11:12:31 AM PDT by RitchieAprile (The Democrat Party is a continuing criminal enterprise..)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk
HP not stupid? Coulda fooled me. They're dumping the tablet they launched a month ago.

Laptops are still what businesses use on the road. Besides, they had free advertising, all those HP logos on their stuff people use at the office and at home. And what about the volume discounts they get for buying huge amounts of components? Aren't they gonna miss that, whatever they choose to make?

24 posted on 08/24/2011 11:14:31 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Redleg Duke

I find that interesting. Back in 1976 I was fortunate enough to take a tour of the HP Factory that made Oscilloscopes. If I remember Correctly EVERYTHING to make an Oscilloscope was made by HP from the CRT’s to the Resistors and transistors.

And at the time HP test equipment was simply the very best you could buy.

Sometimes you have to look back and see that the beginnings of the end for a company occur when the Lawyers and Accountants run the Company instead of the Engineers who design and build the products the company is known for.


25 posted on 08/24/2011 11:15:05 AM PDT by The Working Man
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk

HP is not being stupid at all. Laptops and desktop computers will go the way of the VHS tape.

The new tablet stuff has rendered them obsolete and as the tablets become more powerful there will be no need for personal computers as we understand them, outside of core infrastructure.


Yes, but didn’t HP discontinue their tablet too?


26 posted on 08/24/2011 11:17:56 AM PDT by chaosagent (Remember, no matter how you slice it, forbidden fruit still tastes the sweetest!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog

meadow muffins


27 posted on 08/24/2011 11:26:57 AM PDT by petro45acp (NO good endeavour survives an excess of "adult supervision" (hence the American experiment))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Free Vulcan

It’s hard to focus on the long term when you are a CEO that plans to pump up your stock options, cash out and move on in a couple of years to the next sucker.


28 posted on 08/24/2011 11:28:48 AM PDT by Dick Holmes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk

I do CAD-CAM work here, no way a tablet can begin to do what is needed in that area. They may be fine for the social media and other simple input apps, but anyone who is serious about worker production in an office setting will always take a PC over any small tablet now.

The best of both worlds is having both, but workers will be far more productive in a non-virtual office setting with a dedicated workstation to input on, and also far easier to control sensitive data if you are working in that area also.


29 posted on 08/24/2011 11:31:31 AM PDT by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: The Working Man

Think also of HP calculators. They were the best and now they are gone.


30 posted on 08/24/2011 11:39:43 AM PDT by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Abathar; Ouderkirk

Well said Abathar, throw in the use of dual screens for CADD and tablet will never do. Screen size is also of importance for many applications.


31 posted on 08/24/2011 11:40:57 AM PDT by Ratman83
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Citizen Tom Paine

That is because they wanted to stop the reverse polish notation.


32 posted on 08/24/2011 11:42:38 AM PDT by Ratman83
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: DonaldC
I’ve not used a tablet myself, but it seems more an entertainment curiosity to me. Maybe others can give some insights i don’t have.

I think you have it right. A lot of users just want to send email and surf the web. Tablets are good for that, very portable and very easy to use. In the past some users have had $1500 desktop machines and used them for surfing the web. That behavior is going away.

Power users won't be happy with tablets, but power users know enough to stay away from tablets for any serious work.

33 posted on 08/24/2011 11:46:32 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (The USSR spent itself into bankruptcy and collapsed -- and aren't we on the same path now?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

The only thing that has destroyed more American businesses than union labor is American management.


34 posted on 08/24/2011 11:51:04 AM PDT by Last Dakotan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk; Dick Holmes
Just Best Buy has OVER 150,000 HP tablets in stock. They have sold about 80,000. HP is lost in the tablet world.
35 posted on 08/24/2011 11:54:59 AM PDT by mad_as_he$$
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: DonaldC; Ouderkirk
I’ve not used a tablet myself, but it seems more an entertainment curiosity to me. Maybe others can give some insights i don’t have.

Someone should invent a tablet with a fold down keyboard attached to it. That would be really useful, seems to me.
36 posted on 08/24/2011 11:55:55 AM PDT by youngidiot (Hear Hear!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk
The new tablet stuff has rendered them obsolete and as the tablets become more powerful there will be no need for personal computers as we understand them, outside of core infrastructure.

That is clearly wishful thinking. REAL, productive work cannot be accomplished on a tablet. Mighty handy for e-mail, PIM, and going surfing on YouTube... Maybe useful taking inventory, and might replace the written tickets waitresses use, but try and crunch accounting, creating graphics and imaging, running a spreadsheet, or even writing a novel on a tablet - It ain't gonna happen. There just isn't enough real estate on a tablet, not to mention power.

37 posted on 08/24/2011 11:57:39 AM PDT by roamer_1 (Globalism is just socialism in a business suit.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Abathar
I do CAD-CAM ...

As do I. Solidworks and Pro/E. No, they are not going to run on a tablet, but they are not tablet type of programs that you're going to run in an airport or in front of the TV are they? I have an "engineering laptop" so designated by my companies IT folks and it has Solidworks 2010 on it and a dual monitor adapter in the base for my desktop. I don't use Solidworks while travelling with this PC except to view files, nothing more. Can't work in the constraints of a laptop environment. Think of what the average person does with a laptop PC. Surf, email, maybe a report or basic presentation outline. Is away from your desk the optimum situation for creating great anything? Not for me at least. While my laptop stays in the bag until needed, the tablet (iPad2 specifically) is the device of choice for things other than work.

38 posted on 08/24/2011 12:04:18 PM PDT by Ouderkirk (Democrats...the party of Slavery, Segregation, Sodomy, and Sedition)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog
Companies were not run like this for the first 200 yrs of our Republic until MBA programs started popping up like mushrooms.

Yes, and Bob Lutz of GM talks at length about this in his latest book. MBAs are typically very short term thinkers. What they are mostly concerned about is advancing their careers and building up their own personal wealth. And they have been damn good at it. But they have destroyed company after company. If the business professors at Harvard or Stanford (and all the other top MBA factories) really knew how to more effectively run companies they would be running these companies and making a lot more money.

I known quite a few MBAs over the years and I haven't met a single one who had any passion for product development, engineering excellence, innovation, or quality manufacturing. There are undeniably some but I haven't run across them.

The ascendancy of the MBA in American Business tracks perfectly with the economic decline of our manufacturing. There are a lot of other reasons and they are mostly concerned with governmental policies and perhaps they are probably greater factors than the MBA but in my opinion MBAs have been a huge negative in American Business.
39 posted on 08/24/2011 12:04:51 PM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Last Dakotan

One thing that has destroyed more American businesses than union labor and American management combined is the US government and its regulations.


40 posted on 08/24/2011 12:18:31 PM PDT by Ratman83
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Myrddin; Ouderkirk
Tablets are fine for the end user. I'm a software/hardware developer. I need to keyboard/mouse, big screen, large RAM and large disk to do my job. What I produce may well end up on a tablet target, but that is a piss poor device to use for development.

Ditto for designing graphics and video editing. I need a quad core computer, a BIG screen, mouse and keyboard. No way you can do that on a tablet.

41 posted on 08/24/2011 12:26:54 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (My greatest fear is that when I'm gone my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog; Dick Holmes; archy

In the Korean War, the Chinese Army did a pretty good job of banging our troops up while using whistles, bugles and flares for commo.

It’s painful to contemplate going against them now that they have nearly reached technical parity at least at the troop level.


42 posted on 08/24/2011 12:29:05 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Graewoulf

ANY union? I like my credit union. Union 76 was alright.


43 posted on 08/24/2011 12:30:45 PM PDT by tnlibertarian (Don't mend SS, end it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Ouderkirk

As a rabid fan of the iPad, I can assure you desktop computers are far from obsolete.


44 posted on 08/24/2011 12:34:09 PM PDT by ctdonath2 ($1 meals: http://abuckaplate.blogspot.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog; Dick Holmes
It doesn't help that the regulatory landscape is so chaotic that management can't make any long term plans.
45 posted on 08/24/2011 12:35:52 PM PDT by Little Ray (FOR the best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: truthguy

In a quick look of the history of the MBA, it doesn’t look any different than the usual create a degree, and they will come. Harvard took it on in 1908, and then it gained credibility. It all sounds too much like the “food pyramid” where a diet is imposed without any shred of evidence of being correct, and put into the public’s eye, and on cereal boxes, and voila!, it can not be questioned.

The left’s love of “accreditation” goes too far.

It is also the model used to impose european schooling (actually Prussian schooling) on this country by sending students to europe to get degrees not offered here, come back and get into government and civil jobs, and then THEY want to impose the same system here. That is how we got public schools.

This MBA stuff is not too different.


46 posted on 08/24/2011 12:41:06 PM PDT by TruthConquers (Delendae sunt publicae scholae)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Buckeye McFrog
"Companies were not run like this for the first 200 yrs of our Republic until MBA programs started popping up like mushrooms."

When our country started out, protective tariff income was 100% of Federal Revenues. \

One can see the story here in the average tariff the last column, and in the % of Federal Revenues, third column.

47 posted on 08/24/2011 12:44:09 PM PDT by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Ratman83

“Well said Abathar, throw in the use of dual screens for CADD and tablet will never do. Screen size is also of importance for many applications.”

Ah, but fantasize for a moment about using a good solid modelling program like IronCad coupled with a Kinect game controller, 3D glasses and a rapid prototyping 3D printer.

I saw a TV show about oil exploration which demo’d 3D glasses and three engineers walking around & through a visualization of geology going 5 miles deep and scores of miles wide & long.

Think of doing a virtual walk through of the part or machine you are designing. Beats a 36” monitor!


48 posted on 08/24/2011 12:55:45 PM PDT by BwanaNdege (“Man has often lost his way, but modern man has lost his address” - Gilbert K. Chesterton)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: BwanaNdege

Nice, but you will not get that from a tablet.


49 posted on 08/24/2011 12:58:18 PM PDT by Ratman83
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: Dick Holmes

Complex supply chains are the basis for a healthy industrial base. Ship the low level stuff off and in a few years or decades they grow up to replace your industrial base. In the short term, great profits were made. In the long term, the overseas guys became your boss and ate your lunch. The fallacy of business schools is that they treat making maximum profit as the only thing that is important. American companies will learn the hard way when Chinese and Indian companies have replaced them because we do not think strategically like our overseas competitors. It took decades to gut our industrial base and it will take decades to fix it. The current leadership better clue in as a 20% unemployed population will be very focused on taking them out and replacing them with people that care about this issue.


50 posted on 08/24/2011 1:08:18 PM PDT by Gen-X-Dad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-75 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson