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Destiny Is Demography (The Jig Is Up)
The Daily Reckoning ^ | 9-16-2011 | Bill Bonner

Posted on 09/17/2011 8:08:36 PM PDT by blam

Destiny Is Demography

By Bill Bonner

09/16/11 Baltimore, Maryland – The San Francisco Federal Reserve bank came out with a gloomy forecast last month. Its analysts said that stocks were likely to earn paltry returns over the next 10 years. The reason cited was simple enough; stockholders don’t live forever.

‘Demography is destiny,’ said Auguste Comte. ‘It works the other way around too,’ he might have added. If they thought they were going to live longer, America’s most ubiquitous age cohort — the baby boomers — might continue to buy stocks. Instead, the cold hand of the grave is on their shoulders and on the whole economy. The boomers are retiring at the rate of 10,000 per day over the next 18 years. They will sell stocks to finance their remaining years.

Old people have always been a drag on an economy. Migrating tribes left them behind. Eskimos put them out on the ice. Old people generally bowed to their fate with good grace. In times of famine, for example, they stopped eating so the young might live.

Mortality has doomed the stock market, says the S.F. Fed. P/E ratios will likely be cut in half. Investors are unlikely to see their stocks return to 2010 levels, says the report, until 2027. And this assumes that US companies will continue to grow profits as they did since 1954. Not very likely. Because democracy, energy, and financial quackery are destiny too. Jointly and severally, they are responsible for the biggest financial debacle in history.

This week, Deutsche Bank came out with a report of its own. It, too, is confident that the “Golden Age” — 1982-2007 — is over. In its place is a “Grey Age.” Instead of the nominal 12.8% gains of the Golden Age, investors have gotten returns of — 2.8% per annum for the last 4 years. Deutsche Bank expects stock market investors to lose about 10% of their money — in real terms — over the next 10 years, while the economy goes through 3 recessions!

But what would you expect? Everything droops. For the last 3 or 4 centuries the winning formula for developed economies and their governments has been simple: More energy. More output. More people. More credit. More promises. This formula has been so effective for so long people began to think it was destiny itself. It’s not. Instead, it is slave to destiny not its master.

By 2007, the slave was put in his place. The business cycle turned sour. Native populations in Europe and Japan are falling. Energy use per person in the developed world has leveled off. Private sector credit is shrinking. So is real private sector output.

The feds responded to this challenge as they had to every post-WWII slowdown. They added more — more money, more credit. The government itself spent more money and used more energy. But the economy did not react in the old manner.

An obvious reason: people are no longer as young and sans-soucis as they used to be. A young man’s eye may be drawn to fast German cars or slick Italian suits. But an old man can barely see at all. The baby boomers no longer roll their joints; they rub them. And they are no longer the source of an economic boom; now, they are the proximate cause of the bust.

But there’s more to this new Grey Age than demography. People too are subject to the law of declining marginal utility. They wear out. But so do even the most enduring and impressive economic trends. There were only 450 million people on the planet in 1500. It took 99,000 years to reach that level. Then, over the next 5 centuries — the population soared 10 times. Today, it is hard to find a parking place in any major city. How was such a big jump in population possible? Destiny was demography. With ready, cheap energy at hand, man could grow more food. And then he could ship it all around the world. And he could put his talents to work making more and better machines…which would vastly increase his output and his standard of living.

But the Machine Age ages too. The first tractors appeared more than 100 years ago. They may have increased production 10…20…100 times. Since then, improvements have been incremental, not revolutionary. We have bigger, faster, better tractors — that use more energy than ever.

Meanwhile, energy itself came to be more expensive. When the price of energy rose in the ’70s, the “30 glorious years” that followed WWII were soon over. Hourly wage rates stopped increasing and have not gone up since.

Yes, there is plenty of energy around. But it is net output that you get from energy that counts, not the raw output. If a gallon of gasoline costs $5…it must produce more than $5 in additional output or the economy gets poorer. As the price rises fewer and fewer new energy apps pay off.

Likewise, credit is subject to the law of declining marginal utility too. In 1950, an additional dollar of credit added about 70 cents to GDP. By 2007, the US economy was adding more than $5 of debt to produce a single new dollar’s worth of GDP. Now, the feds’ new credit inputs produce negative real returns.

The jig is up. More no longer works.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aging; babyboomers; demography; economy

1 posted on 09/17/2011 8:08:44 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

As we boomers age, we are not leaving the workforce in the same numbers as our predecessors did. We are working years longer than usual and will continue to do so out of financial need. My 401K is stagnant and I cant expect SS to be there.......


2 posted on 09/17/2011 8:17:16 PM PDT by Red Badger ("Treason doth never prosper.... What's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.")
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To: blam
Deutsche Bank expects stock market investors to lose about 10% of their money — in real terms — over the next 10 years, while the economy goes through 3 recessions!

This strikes me as an overly optimistic prediction.

3 posted on 09/17/2011 8:24:04 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ( "The right to offend is far more important than any right not to be offended." - Rowan Atkinson)
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To: Red Badger
" We are working years longer than usual and will continue to do so out of financial need."

I retired at age 50...17 years ago.

4 posted on 09/17/2011 8:28:12 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

You are the exception.


5 posted on 09/17/2011 8:32:18 PM PDT by Rocky (REPEAL IT!)
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To: blam

I’m 56, and dont plan on retiring any time soon. Same with my co-workers. Of course, living in Florida makes it easier........


6 posted on 09/17/2011 8:35:25 PM PDT by Red Badger ("Treason doth never prosper.... What's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.")
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To: Red Badger
Boomers working longer really is the only solution. I can see some really creative solutions coming into play. For example:

  1. Work 4 days a week and collect 20% social security, 3 days and collect 40%, 2 and collect 60%.
  2. Minimum age of 62 for certain jobs, particularly in the government sector. Start cutting the bottom 20% of performers every year to create more openings.
  3. Work at home type jobs. Property tax exemptions for anyone over 60 who puts in a given number of hours tutoring, baby sitting, etc.
  4. Periodic drug testing for people receiving SSI crazy checks. Let them learn to pick vegetables, fix roofs or do all the jobs we supposedly need illegal aliens to do.
  5. Same rule applies to elderly immigrants as American natives-- you need to work the same number of quarters to become eligible for Social Security, SSI, etc. If your kids want to bring you in from the home country, they can either make enough money to support you, you can bring enough savings to support yourself, or you can stay in your home country where the cost of living is probably cheaper. Your family finances are not the responsibility of the American taxpayer.

7 posted on 09/17/2011 8:36:23 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Red Badger
"Of course, living in Florida makes it easier........"

LOL. I'm just north of the Florida state line in Mobile.

8 posted on 09/17/2011 8:41:09 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

I’m in Ft. Walton Beach!....Howdy, neighbor!.......


9 posted on 09/17/2011 8:43:03 PM PDT by Red Badger ("Treason doth never prosper.... What's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.")
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To: Mr. Jeeves

Indeed. This is why I cashed out in 2008. Peak of the Boomers prime spending ages passing through.

Demographics is destiny.


10 posted on 09/17/2011 8:43:26 PM PDT by BenKenobi (Honkeys for Herman! “10 percent is enough for God; 9 percent is enough for government")
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To: Vigilanteman

The real solution is the following.

1. Cut taxes.
2. Cut spending.

The only way you are going to see kids having kids is if you get rid of the following.

1, the prices of homes have to fall back down to market demand. Kids can’t buy a house and raise a family because houses are way too expensive.

2, taxes have to be cut, so that people can actually work and SAVE money.

3, eliminate pre requirements for jobs that aren’t necessary to do the jobs. Creeping credentialism makes kids take longer to actually get productive jobs.

4, eliminate the public sector unions.

5, Why does university cost so much and take so long? It’s a huge burden on kids these days.

All 5 of these things are going to go away, because they are killing America.


11 posted on 09/17/2011 8:51:38 PM PDT by BenKenobi (Honkeys for Herman! “10 percent is enough for God; 9 percent is enough for government")
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To: blam
35 here. And have been living larger every day since.

(I'm not being cocky. I'm fully cognizant that no one is, nor am I, guaranteed one more morsel of food nor even one more breath).


12 posted on 09/17/2011 9:04:44 PM PDT by I see my hands (Keep your sunny side up!)
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To: Vigilanteman

We already have property tax exemptions for seniors........


13 posted on 09/17/2011 9:08:11 PM PDT by Red Badger ("Treason doth never prosper.... What's the reason? Why if it prosper, none dare call it treason.")
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To: blam

Oh, please. This is just the “Culture of Death” turning on the Baby Boomers, as they’ve gotten “too old.”

Also, those who are old enough (ahem) to remember Carter remember the “new normal” of lowered expectations and energy misery that the press blathered about, just like this article. This piece only proves that History repeats itself - or rather, that lazy hacks can plagiarize 35 year old articles when nobody calls B.S. on them.

There’s nothing wrong with this Carterized economy that a little Reaganomics won’t cure.


14 posted on 09/17/2011 9:23:01 PM PDT by mrreaganaut (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: mrreaganaut

The Hispanic adult-care workers (not all Hispanics) will be quite happy to have your folks sit in their own sh!t for days on end; breed or die!


15 posted on 09/17/2011 11:03:34 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: Red Badger
"We already have property tax exemptions for seniors........"

We do too but, you have to be on the verge of poverty to qualify. It's age and income.

16 posted on 09/18/2011 12:23:18 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam

It seems if all these retirees are selling stock to finance their retirement there should be a huge influx of capital gains tax money flowing to the government


17 posted on 09/18/2011 2:00:42 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: blam
Investors are unlikely to see their stocks return to 2010 levels, says the report, until 2027.

A mere 17 years.

After the stock market (DJIA) peaked in 1929, it didn't return to that level for another 25 years.

18 posted on 09/18/2011 5:49:35 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: 101voodoo
"It seems if all these retirees are selling stock to finance their retirement there should be a huge influx of capital gains tax money flowing to the government "

When you're old, you pay way less taxes when you cash-out.

19 posted on 09/18/2011 8:46:37 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Think of the volume. Besides after Ostupid gets done those rates will be much higher.


20 posted on 09/18/2011 11:59:44 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: blam

bump for later reference


21 posted on 09/18/2011 3:57:09 PM PDT by Robert357 (D.Rather "Hoist with his own petard!" www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1223916/posts)
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