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To: tedw
Sec. 6 below. To be honest,I wish it wasn’t there but this bill is better than the current situation. If you are going to argue the Administration won’t enforce the law, then why bother passing any laws? This bill is a vast improvement in the national situation, and states still retain their authority to fine and suspend business license laws. If the Feds dont enforce, the States still can. Read the bill.

I read the bill and discussed it with Kris Kobach and others. States only have license control IF the Feds have already intervened in some way. There can be an unlimited delay and exceptions. The states can NOT enforce the law, and I have spoken on a conference call posing as a friend of the Chamber and was told they can use the preemption to get rid of SB1070 and other state laws against illegals. I is a MESS.

36 posted on 09/21/2011 6:10:29 PM PDT by montag813
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To: montag813

I believe you are in error. If you are familiar with the Immigration and Control Act of 1986 it specifically allowed the states to retain juridiction in the area of licensing. The recent Supreme Court Decision regarding E-verify made that abundantly clear. The bill does not change that. In fact, it says:

A State, locality, municipality, or political subdivision may exercise its authority over business licensing and similar laws as a penalty for failure to use the verification system described in subsection (d) to verify employment eligibility when and as required under subsection (b).’

The statute is pretty clear that in the area of licensing States still have jurisdiction The plain language of the Statute contradict what Kris Kobach says.


37 posted on 09/21/2011 7:25:36 PM PDT by tedw (Constitution)
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