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The GOP Flipped, but Perry Hasn't
Texas Tribune ^ | September 27, 2011 | Mark P. Jones

Posted on 09/28/2011 7:08:25 AM PDT by hocndoc

Somewhat overlooked in the attention heaped upon Gov. Rick Perry's immigration position in the wake of recent weeks’ GOP presidential primary debates is the reality that in 2001, Perry was joined by virtually the entire Republican membership of the Texas Legislature in supporting legislation allowing undocumented immigrants who meet a series of requirements (e.g., be a Texas high school graduate, a Texas resident, and agree to apply for permanent residency when eligible) to pay in-state tuition at Texas public institutions of higher education.

Perry’s decision to defend rather than repudiate the legislation has had the immediate effect of dangling the self-described piñata closer to his bat-swinging presidential primary opponents. If we look back at the legislative politics, or lack thereof, surrounding the passage of the bill in 2001, we see just how far to the right the GOP has moved on immigration issues.

The Texas Legislature in 2001: Today’s conservatives embraced a “Texas Dream Act”

In 2001 the Republican Party enjoyed a narrow majority over the Democratic Party in the Texas Senate (16 to 15), and was in its last session as the minority party in the Texas House, with 72 seats to the Democratic Party’s 78.The final version of HB 1403 was amended and passed by the Senate on May 21, 2001, voted on for a second time in the House (which concurred with the Senate’s amended version) on May 24, and signed into law by Perry on June 16.

In the Senate, the bill passed by a 27-to-3 vote, with 12 Republicans and 15 Democrats in favor, and three Republicans against. Seven of the 12 Republicans who supported the bill continue to serve today in the Texas Senate, with three (Sens. John Carona, Troy Fraser and Florence Shapiro) among only eight senators (out of a total of 19 Republicans) to receive awards for their legislative voting record from the conservative watchdog group Empower Texans. Also voting yes was Texas Commissioner of Agriculture Todd Staples, who was then a senator.

Somewhat overlooked in the attention heaped upon Gov. Rick Perry's immigration position in the wake of recent weeks’ GOP presidential primary debates is the reality that in 2001, Perry was joined by virtually the entire Republican membership of the Texas Legislature in supporting legislation allowing undocumented immigrants who meet a series of requirements (e.g., be a Texas high school graduate, a Texas resident, and agree to apply for permanent residency when eligible) to pay in-state tuition at Texas public institutions of higher education.

Perry’s decision to defend rather than repudiate the legislation has had the immediate effect of dangling the self-described piñata closer to his bat-swinging presidential primary opponents. If we look back at the legislative politics, or lack thereof, surrounding the passage of the bill in 2001, we see just how far to the right the GOP has moved on immigration issues.

The Texas Legislature in 2001: Today’s conservatives embraced a “Texas Dream Act”

In 2001 the Republican Party enjoyed a narrow majority over the Democratic Party in the Texas Senate (16 to 15), and was in its last session as the minority party in the Texas House, with 72 seats to the Democratic Party’s 78. The final version of HB 1403 was amended and passed by the Senate on May 21, 2001, voted on for a second time in the House (which concurred with the Senate’s amended version) on May 24, and signed into law by Perry on June 16.

In the Senate, the bill passed by a 27-to-3 vote, with 12 Republicans and 15 Democrats in favor, and three Republicans against. Seven of the 12 Republicans who supported the bill continue to serve today in the Texas Senate, with three (Sens. John Carona, Troy Fraser and Florence Shapiro) among only eight senators (out of a total of 19 Republicans) to receive awards for their legislative voting record from the conservative watchdog group Empower Texans. Also voting yes was Texas Commissioner of Agriculture Todd Staples, who was then a senator.

The final version of the bill received even stronger Republican backing in the House, with 64 Republicans joining 66 Democrats to vote yes (130 total) versus only two dissenting votes (both Republicans). In the vote on the original version of HB 1403 on April 23, 67 Republicans joined 75 Democrats to approve the bill, with one Republican voting no. Ten years later, 23 of the 64 Republicans (along with two Democrats who would later switch to the Republican Party) who voted yea on the final version of the bill continued in office, as did two Republicans who voted for the bill on April 23 but were absent on May 24.

These legislators are some of the Texas House’s most conservative members (based on both the Empower Texans 2011 Legislative Scorecard as well as the Baker Institute’s 2011 Liberal-Conservative rating), including former House Speaker (2003-09) Tom Craddick, Sid Miller, Leo Berman, Phil King, Dennis Bonnen, Wayne Christian and Bill Callegari. All were classified by both Empower Texans and the Baker Institute as among the most conservative third of the Republican delegation in the 2011 Texas House. Furthermore, five additional representatives who supported the bill (Gary Elkins, Charlie Howard, Lois Kolkhorst, Geanie Morrison and Burt Solomons) were considered by both Empower Texans and the Baker Institute to be among the most conservative half of the 2011 Republican caucus.

Berman is especially well known for his hawkish stance on immigration. In 2011 he was the author of several bills in this area, including one patterned on Arizona’s SB 1070 and others which proposed to end birthright citizenship and to make English the state’s official language. In addition, one of the Republican representatives who voted for HB 1403, Kenny Marchant, now represents Texas in the U.S. House, where he is located in the most conservative decile of the House membership by Voteview.org.

he difference a decade can make

The contrast between the near-universal Republican support for HB 1403 (94 percent of the Republican legislators cast yea votes, and only 6 percent voted nay) in 2001 and the present attacks in 2011 on Perry for his past support of HB 1403 underscores how the median position within the Republican Party on immigration changed during the past decade. It also reflects somewhat the distinct historical and societal context in which the immigration debate occurs in Texas compared to elsewhere in the country.

Back in 2001, Perry’s support for this legislation was fully within the mainstream of the Texas Republican Party, and in many (though not all) respects of the national Republican Party as well. Ten years later, what is considered mainstream within the GOP nationally (as well as within the Texas GOP) clearly has changed, with a sharp move to the right within the party on the topic of immigration.

What a decade ago was a consensus position on the issue of in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants is now seen as an outlier position at the liberal end of the Republican ideological spectrum. As a result, Perry’s decision to not refute his past position on in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants (i.e., to not engage in a flip-flop), and less the decision itself, is what has principally left him open to attacks from his opponents.

His refusal to modify his stance has provided ammunition to his Republican primary opponents in their attempt to portray him as being outside of the Republican mainstream on immigration due to a decision which, at the time Perry made it, enjoyed near-absolute consensus within the Texas Republican Party.


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: amnesty; conservative; federalism; formerdemocratperry; heartless; illegalimmigration; illegals; openborders; perry; perry2012; rickperry; rino
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These are the right of right, conservative Representatives. Their votes could never be considered "pandering."
1 posted on 09/28/2011 7:08:28 AM PDT by hocndoc
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To: hocndoc; shield

The list of conservatives who voted for 1403 have not become less conservative. The legislation fits Texas’ needs due to the hole the Feds have dug for us.


2 posted on 09/28/2011 7:14:11 AM PDT by hocndoc (http://WingRight.org I'm not afraid to use my mustard seed. 2 Control the border, Patrol the border!)
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To: hocndoc
Some other history for the thread and topic.

State Actions

In June 2001, Texas (HB1403) was the first state to pass legislation allowing in-state tuition for immigrant students, followed by California (AB540), Utah (HB144), and New York (SB7784) in 2001-2002; Washington (HB1079), Oklahoma (SB596) and Illinois (HB60) in 2003; Kansas (HB2145) in 2004; New Mexico (SB582) in 2005; Nebraska (LB239) in 2006; Wisconsin (A75) in 2009; Maryland (S167/H470) and Connecticut (H6390) in 2011. The state laws permit these students to become eligible for in-state tuition if they graduate from state high schools, have two to three years residence in the state, and apply to a state college or university. The student may be required to sign an affidavit promising to seek legal immigration status.  These requirements for unauthorized immigrant students are stricter than the residency requirements for out-of-state students to gain in-state tuition.

In 2008, Oklahoma passed HB 1804 which ended its in-state tuition benefit, including financial aid, for students without lawful presence in the United States. The Act allows the Oklahoma State Regents to enroll a student in higher education institutions permitted that they meet special requirements.  

States that have barred unauthorized immigrant students from in-state tuition benefits include Arizona (Proposition 300, 2006), Colorado (HB 1023, 2006), Georgia (SB 492, 2008), South Carolina (HB4400, 2008), and Indiana (H 1402, 2011). 


3 posted on 09/28/2011 7:15:21 AM PDT by deport
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To: hocndoc

How do you become a “Texas resident” if you are an illegal?


4 posted on 09/28/2011 7:15:35 AM PDT by broken_arrow1 (I regret that I have but one life to give for my country - Nathan Hale "Patriot")
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To: hocndoc

The idiot author of this piece neglects to mention that the Republican legislators flipped because we the Texas voters fired a lot of the RINOs and indeed a lot of the Democrats who were for this and scared the crap out of the remainder.


5 posted on 09/28/2011 7:15:53 AM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: hocndoc
agree to apply for permanent residency when eligible

In other words, agree to apply for the AMNESTY.

It is true that the Texas Power Elite, LBJ/Rove/Bush/Perry have pushed for Amnesty for a number of years. That DOES NOT make it a good idea.

6 posted on 09/28/2011 7:16:25 AM PDT by iowamark (Rick Perry says I'm heartless.)
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To: hocndoc

The Texas Tribune Progressive Ties

Rosenthal Alves – Texas Tribune, UT Establishment, and Leftist donors

http://www.agendawise.com/2011/04/rosenthal-alves-texas-tribune-ut-establishment-and-leftist-donors/

See the George Soros connection-


7 posted on 09/28/2011 7:17:35 AM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: hocndoc

The Truth about this issue is finally starting to come out, thank God we live in the information age.

Go Perry!


8 posted on 09/28/2011 7:17:48 AM PDT by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama = Epic Fail)
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To: hocndoc
Well, why didn't he say so?

Why accuse the very people whose votes he seeks of having no heart?

Is it our fault that we are repulsed by a pollutician who not only dodges a legitimate question but then turns around and paints us as hateful?

9 posted on 09/28/2011 7:19:28 AM PDT by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: Cincinatus' Wife; RoosterRedux; jonrick46; deepbluesea; RockinRight; TexMom7; potlatch; ...
Perry Ping....

IF you'd rather NOT be pinged FReepmail me.

IF you'd like to be added FReepmail me. Thanks.

*****************************************************************************************************************************************************


10 posted on 09/28/2011 7:20:01 AM PDT by shield (Rev 2:9 Woe unto those who say they are Judahites and are not, but are of the syna GOG ue of Satan.)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

Sworn in as an honorary Texan by Hayden Fry.


11 posted on 09/28/2011 7:20:22 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: hocndoc
Its not really Perry's primary opponents who are swinging at him, its the primary voters.

We don't like goodies for illegals; never have.

12 posted on 09/28/2011 7:20:58 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: broken_arrow1
How do you become a “Texas resident” if you are an illegal?

To quote one of my favorite scenes from Animal House, "Don't stop him. He's on a roll."

13 posted on 09/28/2011 7:20:58 AM PDT by Texas Eagle (If it wasn't for double-standards, Liberals would have no standards at all -- Texas Eagle)
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To: hocndoc
Back in 2001, Perry’s support for this legislation was fully within the mainstream of the Texas Republican Party, and in many (though not all) respects of the national Republican Party as well. Ten years later, what is considered mainstream within the GOP nationally (as well as within the Texas GOP) clearly has changed, with a sharp move to the right within the party on the topic of immigration.

I'd say that is little more than spin of the real situation concerning illegal aliens. What has happened is that the issue has gone from one most of the pubic knew little about to one that became one of the most contentious issues of the day.

The public learned gradually that many politicians entrusted with enforcing immigration law had been deliberately ignoring the law and pursuing some alternate agenda they never bothered to inform the public about. Once the public began to learn of this deceit, particularly during GWB's attempts to grant amnesty to millions of illegal aliens, the public became involved.

It has been a matter of the public learning what deceitful politicians had been doing, or not doing, politicians such as both Bushes, Ted Kennedy, John McCain, Slick Willie, Obama and Rick Perry and many others less well known. And then these same politicians whose negligence caused the problem offer 'solutions' such as amnesty for all illegals (buying future votes and present cheap labor) and assorted Dream Acts and other shameless pandering to ethnic groups.

When the voters know of such pandering, they oppose it by large margins.

14 posted on 09/28/2011 7:21:28 AM PDT by Will88
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To: broken_arrow1

Utility bill with the parents name on it. It is that simple.


15 posted on 09/28/2011 7:22:11 AM PDT by shield (Rev 2:9 Woe unto those who say they are Judahites and are not, but are of the syna GOG ue of Satan.)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

Hell, here in NYS, we can’t even get our third generation CITIZENS to graduate from high school...


16 posted on 09/28/2011 7:22:39 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: hocndoc
More damage control. The Reps in the Texas legislature are trying to overturn the law. And if a vote were taken by the people of Texas in a referendum today, in-state tuition for illegals would be defeated. Illegal aliens cost the taxpayers of Texas an estimated $4.7 billion. In AZ, SC, GA, and CO the state legislatures passed bills specifically banning in-state tuition for illegal aliens.

Perry's Lt Gov doesn't support in-state tuition for illegals. 81% of likely voters oppose granting in-state tuition to illegal aliens in their state, with 12% supporting tuition breaks for illegal aliens (Rasmussen, August 2011). Perry is not only wrong substantively, he is wrong politically.

17 posted on 09/28/2011 7:23:06 AM PDT by kabar
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To: TexasFreeper2009

Is it not a magnet for illegal immigration? Isn’t that the nut of the issue here? Just because most all republicans say OK, does that make it OK? Broad is the path that leads to destruction, and many people follow it.


18 posted on 09/28/2011 7:24:07 AM PDT by dps.inspect (the system is rigged...)
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To: TexasFreeper2009

To 8 - Damn straight! Perry WILL overcome the smear attacks, WILL be the GOP nominee, and WILL oust Obama from the White House!


19 posted on 09/28/2011 7:24:32 AM PDT by jla (Real Americans Support Rick Perry)
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To: deport

Even in MD, the bluest of blue states, the passage of in-state tuition for illegals caused a firestorm of protest and sparked a petitition to get the issue on the ballot. Signatures were collected in record time and the issue is now on the ballot in 2012. In-state tuition has been suspended pending the outcome of the referendum.


20 posted on 09/28/2011 7:26:23 AM PDT by kabar
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To: MrEdd

flipped because we the Texas voters fired a lot of the RINOs and indeed a lot of the Democrats who were for this and scared the crap out of the remainder.

Yes! We did the same in Louisiana! Immigration is just one of the issues but we started taking Pelosi’s advice and are “draining the swamp”. The last “illustrious political leader” to go will be Mary Landrieu in 2014 (I believe). Louisiana, a notorious blue state has become scarlet! Other than her all our state rep including our governer are conservative republicans.


21 posted on 09/28/2011 7:26:28 AM PDT by Bitsy (!)
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To: broken_arrow1

These are really exceptions to the requirement for non-resident tuition. Also in the Bill are exceptions for people who live in counties in other States that lie along the border with Texas, for residents of Mexico who go to certain universities and demonstrate need, veterans, military personnel and their dependents and other groups.
http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/ED/htm/ED.54.htm#54.058


22 posted on 09/28/2011 7:31:21 AM PDT by hocndoc (http://WingRight.org I'm not afraid to use my mustard seed. 2 Control the border, Patrol the border!)
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To: hocndoc
I know this is about in state tuition but we have a FReeper living on the Texas Mexico border, here is what he told me:

He’s not kidding about the Ranger Interdiction Team. We live in the Valley and from whatever point A is - point B - before they fly the Black Hawks low over the river is our roof. Perry and his team are all that stands between us and being over run by the cartels, and we surely appreciate that.

23 posted on 09/28/2011 7:31:44 AM PDT by shield (Rev 2:9 Woe unto those who say they are Judahites and are not, but are of the syna GOG ue of Satan.)
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To: hocndoc

Your mistake is trying to reason with people who approach politics and public policy as if they are the NFL Game of the Week. Perry has many pros and some cons, but the average Freeper seems to be incapable of anything more than cheerleading for his current favorite candidate and trash talking everyone else.

The truth is that all the candidates have some negatives of consequence. On balance, however, any of them would be better than Obamalini, and we are serving the cause of replacing Wonder Boy poorly when we savage candidates other than our favorite candidate without any real knowledge or sense of balance. I could easily support Cain, Perry, Bachmann, Palin, or Santorum, and I could even support RP or Newt if either were the nominee (Neither will be).

What we don’t need is to let childish partisanship cripple our potential candidates. That only serves Obamalini.


24 posted on 09/28/2011 7:32:52 AM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: MrEdd

However, the author lists a group of men and women who are our most conservative and who are still in office, sometimes in higher office.


25 posted on 09/28/2011 7:32:52 AM PDT by hocndoc (http://WingRight.org I'm not afraid to use my mustard seed. 2 Control the border, Patrol the border!)
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To: kabar

Pro or Con this issue wouldn’t have to be debated if the Federal Gov’t would do its job on the borders. There wouldn’t even be a need to provide education at the lower levels of elementary and high school either.


26 posted on 09/28/2011 7:33:26 AM PDT by deport
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To: hocndoc

Well I guess that makes us “Heartless” conservatives just plain wrong!

The votes of a bunch of “conservative” GOP congress people must mean by extension, that that is the conservative position, right?


27 posted on 09/28/2011 7:34:04 AM PDT by SoConPubbie
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To: broken_arrow1

“How do you become a “Texas resident” if you are an illegal?”
__________________________________________________________________________________________

It’s a pretty easy step by step process.

1. Float on inner tube across Rio Grande.

2. Evade Border Patrol.

3. Squeeze into 12 passenger van with 25 other invaders.

4. Ride to DFW Mexoplex and apply for a job at the fast food restaurant where the coyote dumps you out.

5. Go to emergency room at Parkland Hospital to get your TB treated for free.

6. Go to work. Cough on food.

7. Drive around without license or liability insurance.

8. Attend amnesty rally. Wave Me-hee-can flag.

9. Get drunk at “after rally fiesta”. Go wrong way on freeway and kill U.S. citizen.


28 posted on 09/28/2011 7:34:14 AM PDT by NeverForgetBataan (To the German Commander: ..........................NUTS !)
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To: kabar

The “Reps” are not trying to overturn this law - our Representatives are not in Session for another year and a half (thank the Lord, they only meet 120 days, every two years), and none of them introduced a Bill to overturn it in the last Session (January to May, 2011).

One bill came up in the Senate (Birdwell) in this year, but never even made it to a hearing in committee.


29 posted on 09/28/2011 7:38:13 AM PDT by hocndoc (http://WingRight.org I'm not afraid to use my mustard seed. 2 Control the border, Patrol the border!)
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To: kabar

Although the illegals are still getting in-state tuition in Maryland the way they always have — because they don’t check for citizenship status.

The law was merely to codify and legalize a situation that is already widespread. If you don’t pass a law banning the practice, the illegals will get in. That’s why states actually pass laws requiring schools to check legal status. If a state doesn’t have a law requiring a check of legal status in the country in order to qualify, it is likely that illegals are getting in-state tuition.


30 posted on 09/28/2011 7:38:13 AM PDT by CharlesWayneCT
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To: hocndoc

Policies that may make sense for a border state trying to deal with a crisis created by federal unwillingness to enforce its laws may not make sense as federal policies.

I’m unclear why Perry felt it necessary to defend this policy with the implication that it would be appropriate for the nation as a whole.

States are supposed to do things that work just for them. That’s the whole point of federalism.


31 posted on 09/28/2011 7:38:56 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: MrEdd
The idiot author of this piece neglects to mention that the Republican legislators flipped because we the Texas voters fired a lot of the RINOs and indeed a lot of the Democrats who were for this and scared the crap out of the remainder

Yeah! That's why they immediately revoked it, right? Oh wait.........

32 posted on 09/28/2011 7:40:06 AM PDT by McGavin999
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To: deport
40% of the 12 to 20 million illegal aliens in this country came here legally and overstayed their visas. Securing the border only fixes part of the problem.

When you reward illegal behavior with such things as in-state tuition or sanctuary cities, you get more of it. There are only 6,000 ICE agents. It is essential that state and local enforcement cooperate with the Feds in the enforcement of our immigration laws just like they do with kidnapping, bank robbery, counterfeiting, etc. The Secure Communities and 287 g programs are supposed to foster that cooperation.

Perry has not been a supporter of E-Verify even for state employees. We need to cut off the job magnet. Perry is just pandering to Hispanics who comprise 37.6% of the population of Texas and the Chamber of Commerce. Illegals make up 9% of the work force.

33 posted on 09/28/2011 7:41:11 AM PDT by kabar
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To: hocndoc

Is it groundhog day again?


34 posted on 09/28/2011 7:42:18 AM PDT by listenhillary (Look your representatives in the eye and ask if they intend to pay off the debt. They will look away)
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To: broken_arrow1

By living there.....From Webster:Definition of RESIDENT
1a : living in a place for some length of time : residing


35 posted on 09/28/2011 7:45:33 AM PDT by csmusaret (The only borders Obama has closed is a bookstore.)
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To: Sherman Logan

How do you give in-state tuition to the nation as a whole?


36 posted on 09/28/2011 7:45:58 AM PDT by listenhillary (Look your representatives in the eye and ask if they intend to pay off the debt. They will look away)
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To: hocndoc
In-State Tuition Debate Isn't About In-State Tuition (It's about AMNESTY)
37 posted on 09/28/2011 7:46:46 AM PDT by Do Not Make Fun Of His Ears (Bush called us "vigilantes." Perry calls us "heartless.")
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To: kabar
40% of the 12 to 20 million illegal aliens in this country came here legally and overstayed their visas. Securing the border only fixes part of the problem.


When you secure the border you can then take care of the rest of the problem. Until the border is secure the other problems will only be exacerbated.

38 posted on 09/28/2011 7:47:28 AM PDT by deport
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To: hocndoc

The coyote that Perry shot would still be alive if he had been driving a van full of wet Mexicans.


39 posted on 09/28/2011 7:48:49 AM PDT by NeverForgetBataan (To the German Commander: ..........................NUTS !)
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To: Sherman Logan
Policies that may make sense for a border state trying to deal with a crisis created by federal unwillingness to enforce its laws

What "crisis" does the "dream act" apply to. It seems it just gives money to illegal aliens from another country for college. Was the "crisis" that the illegal aliens didn't have enough money for college? Is it a "crisis" if a U.S. citizen from another state doesn't have enough money for college? Is it better to be here illegally from another country than legally from another state?

40 posted on 09/28/2011 7:53:00 AM PDT by Prokopton
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To: hocndoc
One bill came up in the Senate (Birdwell) in this year, but never even made it to a hearing in committee.

It's worth noting that Sen. Brian Birdwell filed a bill to repeal that in-state tuition law just this year in the Senate, where Dewhurst is the presiding office. The bill, Senate Bill 1631, was referred to the Higher Education Committee, chaired by Democratic Sen. Judith Zaffirini. It was heard but never emerged from that committee.

Lt Gov Dewhurst is breaking from Perry on the issue. "If we're not going to give fellow Americans who live in Louisiana or Oklahoma or New Mexico the ability to come into Texas and have in-state tuition and save, then is it fair to give that break to people who are not citizens here?" he told Dallas/Ft. Worth's WFAA. "So, I would not have signed that law."

Dewhurt's chief primary opponent, former Texas solicitor general Ted Cruz, painted the lieutenant governor's position as another flip-flop.

"This is another Republican primary year conversion by David Dewhurst. He was for in-state tuition for illegal immigrants before he was against it," Cruz said in a statement to On Call. "The next Senator from Texas needs to be a strong conservative who knows what he believes. I strongly oppose in-state tuition for illegal aliens, and categorically oppose amnesty or preferential treatment for illegal immigrants."

If repealing or opposing in-state tuition for illegals is not popular among Reps, then why are the two leading candidates for the Senate espousing their opposition to in-state tuition?

Rasmussen: Most Voters Oppose Public Schooling, Tuition Breaks, Driver’s Licenses For Illegal Immigrants

"Several states have made illegal immigrants eligible for lower in-state tuition at colleges and universities, but 81% of voters oppose such a move in their state. Just 12% think illegal immigrants should be eligible for these tuition breaks in their home state. Opposition to allowing illegal immigrants to be eligible for in-state tuition is slightly stronger than it was back in October 2007."

41 posted on 09/28/2011 7:58:33 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar
There are only 6,000 ICE agents. It is essential that state and local enforcement cooperate with the Feds in the enforcement of our immigration laws just like they do with kidnapping, bank robbery, counterfeiting, etc.

That's very true and the only way immigration laws will ever be enforced effectively is with the involvement of local, county and state law enforcement, cooperating with a federal government that intends to enforce the law.

The Feds will never hire enough personnel to enforce immigration law nationwide and they shouldn't. It has to involve law enforcement at all levels. And politicians who oppose that simply oppose enforcing immigration law.

42 posted on 09/28/2011 7:58:57 AM PDT by Will88
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To: deport

You have to do both at the same time. It isn’t that difficult. It is just a matter of political will.


43 posted on 09/28/2011 8:00:26 AM PDT by kabar
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To: broken_arrow1
How do you become a “Texas resident” if you are an illegal?

To qualify, the student must have lived in the state for at least three years before graduating from a Texas high school or receiving a high school equivalency diploma in Texas. The student also must have lived for at least part of that time with a parent or legal guardian and could not have an established residence outside of Texas. In addition, such students were required to sign an affidavit stating that they would apply for permanent residency as soon as they are eligible to do so.

Until 1982, Texas law prohibited local school districts from using state funds to educate undocumented immigrant children; furthermore, districts were allowed to deny enrollment to such children. In 1982, however, the Texas law was deemed unconstitutional. In Plyler v. Doe, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Texas law violated the equal protection provisions of the 14th Amendment. As a result of Plyler v. Doe, states may not deny access to public education to immigrant children residing within their boundaries, regardless of their legal status.

http://www.window.state.tx.us/specialrpt/undocumented/3education.html

44 posted on 09/28/2011 8:04:26 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Will88
Agree 100%. The bleating by the open border, pro-amnesty types that immigration enforcement is solely a federal responsibility is just an excuse for non-enforcement. State and local law enforcement cooperate with the Feds across a broad range of issues that involve Federal law. Why is immigration law any different?

Notice that the same folks who claim that immigration enforcement is strictly a federal matter never mention sanctuary cities and the blatant defiance of federal law.

45 posted on 09/28/2011 8:06:56 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar

What is a state governor supposed to do about a sanctuary city? The city is flaunting federal law, not state law.


46 posted on 09/28/2011 8:10:45 AM PDT by Eva
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To: hocndoc
in 2001, Perry was joined by virtually the entire Republican membership of the Texas Legislature in supporting legislation allowing undocumented immigrants who meet a series of requirements (e.g., be a Texas high school graduate, a Texas resident, and agree to apply for permanent residency when eligible) to pay in-state tuition at Texas public institutions of higher education.

America: A Nation Of Laws

America: A Nation Of Scofflaws

Federal Law Title 8, Chapter 14, Sec. 1623 states:

“an alien who is not lawfully present in the United States shall not be eligible on the basis of residence within a State... for any postsecondary education benefit unless a citizen or national of the United States is eligible for such a benefit.”


47 posted on 09/28/2011 8:26:05 AM PDT by Iron Munro (Now days calling someone a racist is like telling them there's a crumb on their chin)
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To: jla

How do I overcome Mr. Perry’s smear on me?


48 posted on 09/28/2011 8:39:08 AM PDT by chris37 (Heartless.)
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To: broken_arrow1

The same way you do in ALL the other states,just show up.


49 posted on 09/28/2011 8:41:03 AM PDT by Vaduz
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To: Eva
What is a state governor supposed to do about a sanctuary city? The city is flaunting federal law, not state law.

I thought the Governor could only sign legislation (except Executive Order - we won't go there).

The TX legislature tried to pass laws that would put a stop to sanctuary cities...but they (legislators) folded after pressure from big TX RNC donors (HEB's Butts and Perry Homes), IIRC.

50 posted on 09/28/2011 8:49:37 AM PDT by Jane Long (Soli Deo Gloria!)
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