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Chinese telecom firm tied to spy ministry--CIA: Beijing funded Huawei
Washington Times ^ | 10.13.11 | Bill Gertz

Posted on 10/13/2011 6:21:35 PM PDT by casablanca

A U.S. intelligence report for the first time links China’s largest telecommunications company to Beijing’s KGB-like intelligence service and says the company recently received nearly a quarter-billion dollars from the Chinese government.

The disclosures are a setback for Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd.’s efforts to break into the U.S. telecommunications market. The company has been blocked from doing so three times by the U.S. government because of concerns about its links to the Chinese government.

The report by the CIA-based Open Source Center states that Huawei’s chairwoman, Sun Yafang, worked for the Ministry of State Security (MSS) Communications Department before joining the company.

The report on Huawei’s board members states that Ms. Sun used her connections at MSS to help Huawei through “fina

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtontimes.com ...


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: ccp; china; chinesespying; cyberwars; huawei; intelligence; iran; perry; rickperry; statesecurity; texas
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On a related note:

"What a really interesting man he is. Rather straight-spoken. If you didn’t know any better, you'd say he grew up out in West Texas.…He truly is a very powerful chief executive officer and a very focused, very hard driven individual, which, in the world we live in today, is a great attribute."

Gov. Perry Helps Cut Ribbon at Huawei Technologies' New U.S. Headquarters

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eruWGDSYDg

1 posted on 10/13/2011 6:21:44 PM PDT by casablanca
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To: casablanca

Hmmm. Link above didn’t work

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eruWGDSYDg


2 posted on 10/13/2011 6:23:18 PM PDT by casablanca
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To: casablanca

Duh!.....Every Chinese company around the world is a platform for military and economic espionage. All US firms doing business in China are stupidly engaged in technology transfer whether they agree to it or not.


3 posted on 10/13/2011 6:38:05 PM PDT by 3Fingas (Sons and Daughers of Freedom, Committee of Correspondence)
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To: casablanca

Doing the work we aren’t (hi-tech spying)


4 posted on 10/13/2011 6:46:21 PM PDT by expat1000
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To: expat1000
Huawei shows up in just about every problematic country. They had breached UN sanctions by delivering unapproved telecom and other high-tech gear to Iraq before 2003 and had installed a fiber network to help Saddam coordinate his air defenses. They were reportedly (by the Indian press) building a new fiber-optics phone network and surveillance systems in Afghanistan when we invaded there, and those assets were among the first targeted by US/Nato airstrikes. They were all over Libya until February and are still desperately trying to hang on to their embedded assets there:

http://www.shenzhen-standard.com/2011/08/25/huawei-to-rebuild-telecommunications-infrastructure-in-libya/

Phone systems are strategic assets and entrusting them to a foreign firm like Huawei is tantamount to forging a client state relationship with the Chinese. When you do that, trouble follows. For more, see:

http://www.amazon.com/Oil-Card-Economic-Warfare-Century/dp/097779539X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1199719101&sr=8-1

5 posted on 10/13/2011 7:13:33 PM PDT by Tenega
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To: casablanca
I'm not one to boast...

...but right now I'm mighty proud I told Huawei - outright - to their engineering manager - to go take a hike over their China backing when he called unemployed me pleading for me to work for them two weeks ago!

(Yossarian pats himself, literally, on the back....)

And there the suck-up Perry goes to work with them - HA!

6 posted on 10/13/2011 7:30:01 PM PDT by Yossarian ("All the charm of Nixon. All the competency of Carter." - SF Chronicle comment post on Obama)
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To: casablanca
I believe it was Huaawei, and maybe it was ZTE, but anyway, one of those Chinese telcoms...Sprint was pondering them for their 4G network equipment, and the Feds told Sprint that if they used them, Sprint would not get any government contracts. The reason being that the Feds thought the Chinese government had backdoors into the equipment, and that they would be able to sniff on any data moving through Sprint's network, had they used that equipment.

A similar story from my employer, which is a smaller cellular operator. Huawei apparently shot us a VERY good price, because they were wanting to bust into the US market somewhere. But we went with Ericsson instead with that concern being one of the reasons for not going with them.

7 posted on 10/13/2011 7:42:28 PM PDT by Pappy Smear (Support the presidency, end the policies.)
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To: casablanca
I believe it was Huaawei, and maybe it was ZTE, but anyway, one of those Chinese telcoms...Sprint was pondering them for their 4G network equipment, and the Feds told Sprint that if they used them, Sprint would not get any government contracts. The reason being that the Feds thought the Chinese government had backdoors into the equipment, and that they would be able to sniff on any data moving through Sprint's network, had they used that equipment.

A similar story from my employer, which is a smaller cellular operator. Huawei apparently shot us a VERY good price, because they were wanting to bust into the US market somewhere. But we went with Ericsson instead with that concern being one of the reasons for not going with them.

8 posted on 10/13/2011 7:42:43 PM PDT by Pappy Smear (Support the presidency, end the policies.)
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To: Pappy Smear

Smart move on your company’s part. Huawei steals the business data of cooperating firms. Just ask Cisco.


9 posted on 10/13/2011 7:47:34 PM PDT by 3Fingas (Sons and Daughers of Freedom, Committee of Correspondence)
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To: casablanca
On a related note:

"What a really interesting man he is. Rather straight-spoken. If you didn’t know any better, you'd say he grew up out in West Texas.…He truly is a very powerful chief executive officer and a very focused, very hard driven individual, which, in the world we live in today, is a great attribute."

Gov. Perry Helps Cut Ribbon at Huawei Technologies' New U.S. Headquarters


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eruWGDSYDg

How long until Rick removes that from his official video channel? That was a year ago, very surprised that nobody on Perry's staff had picked up on some of the negative things associated with Huawei.
10 posted on 10/13/2011 8:42:03 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: casablanca
Hence that general is skilful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skilful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack. Sun Tzu
11 posted on 10/13/2011 10:23:30 PM PDT by expat1000
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To: casablanca
Governor Rick Perry--who would wish to be President--is in deep doo-doo it would seem on this although I hope not.

In case of the following, it has to be one or the other folks:

A) GOV. PERRY did not know. Which means he is a total IDIOT as a Governor of a major state when it comes to National Security Issues (even I could tell you Huawei Telecom [华为技术有限公司] is an active measures front operation in the business of cyber espionage in the telecom space, directed by the 2nd Bureau of the Ministry of State Security of the Communist Party of China 中华人民共和国国家安全部二局 (overseas Chinese intelligence operation) and accordingly tasked with infiltration of Americab IT/cyber infrastructure.

B) Or GOV. PERRY DID KNOW IT (had knowledge and aforethought), but allowed the investment anyways, in which case it may well border on criminal sedition, knowingly allowing an intelligence front company for the Chi Coms to set up in your state.

It can only be one of the two, when you look at it logically.

Which one is it: IDIOT or SECURITY RISK?

Even the Indians know, this as of over one year ago:

Bharti Jain, ET Bureau May 7, 2010, 03.59am ISTTags:ZTE|R&AW|Huawei|China NEW DELHI: Chinese telecom major Huawei may aggressively deny any link to the China's People's Liberation Army, but independent assessments of Indian intelligence agencies so far clearly point out that PLA remains a customer of the company and has become more involved with it. The security concerns of Indian intelligence agencies about Huawei's close connection with the Chinese security establishment are shared by the US administration and had led the latter to cancel Huawei's 2008 bid to pick up stake in 3Com. Even British intelligence agencies have warned that the Chinese could cripple IT-dependent telecom infrastructure and critical services like water, power and food supplies by embedding malware in equipment installed by firms such as Huawei and ZTE

When we come to the segment on national security in the next Presidential debate, I think this issue should be raised. Not sure who is going to do it, but it should be raised indeed and we should demand an explanation.

12 posted on 10/13/2011 10:42:54 PM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Herman Cain will be the nominee of the GOP! The momentum is unmistakeable. The Dems/RINOs hate it.)
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To: AmericanInTokyo

I vote idiot. I don’t doubt his patriotism, just his ability to out-wit a box of rocks.


13 posted on 10/13/2011 10:47:02 PM PDT by casablanca
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To: casablanca

Does not speak well of him as a potential Commander in Chief, does it?


14 posted on 10/14/2011 12:17:09 AM PDT by AmericanInTokyo (Herman Cain will be the nominee of the GOP! The momentum is unmistakeable. The Dems/RINOs hate it.)
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To: casablanca
Idiot, definitely. 10 minutes on the internet would have clued anybody in that these folks are not the kinds of folks you welcome with open arms. These are some folks that you don't want to do business with, period. The Brits and others were sounding the alarm in 2006 over security concerns.

In August of 2010, Republican Senators were writing the heads of federal agencies and asking for assessments in regards to Huawei working with Sprint:

eight Republican U.S. Senators, led by Sen. Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.), have written to top Obama Administration officials, expressly stating their concern over the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei's proposed bid to sell equipment to Sprint-Nextel.

"We are concerned that Huawei's position as a supplier of Sprint Nextel could create substantial risk for U.S. companies and possibly undermine U.S. national security," they stated in the letters, which were sent to the likes of Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper, and others.

The group of senators -- Christopher S. Bond (R-Mo.), Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.), James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.), Jim Bunning (R-Ky.), Richard M. Burr (R-N.C.), Susan Collins (R-Maine), and Kyl -- link Huawei's past sales to Saddam Hussein and the Taliban, while highlighting its current dealings with Iran. Huawei's relationship with the Iranian military should prohibit it from doing business with the U.S., they argue, because of the imposed sanctions on that country.

"Most troubling," though, are Huawei's "direct ties" to the Chinese military, the senators wrote. "At worst, Huawei's becoming a major supplier of Sprint Nextel could present a case of a company, acting at the direction of and funded by the Chinese military, taking a critical place in the supply chain of the U.S. military, law enforcement and private sector," the senators wrote.


How in the $#^%^$ Hell could Perry miss that? Not even 10 minutes on the internet and Perry could have found out that this company was bad news - just a few months before Perry had the gall to say "What a really interesting man he is. Rather straight-spoken. If you didn’t know any better, you'd say he grew up out in West Texas", there are US Senators publicly raising serious concerns about them.

By the way, Dick Gephardt was a lobbyist for this company.
15 posted on 10/14/2011 2:35:21 AM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: casablanca
Huawei is a fake company that makes cheap unbranded imitations of well known electronic products like iphones and ipads. They mostly work as front for espionage activity in other countries. The terrorists that carried out the deadly Mumbai attacks in 2008 used Huawei phones that don't have unique IMEI codes which makes it difficult to track them down.
16 posted on 10/14/2011 8:15:47 AM PDT by ravager
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To: AmericanInTokyo
US needs to immediately shut down Huawei and ZTE. Check post #16.
17 posted on 10/14/2011 8:20:06 AM PDT by ravager
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To: ravager

Not going to happen. The Brits and Indians may worry about them, but this administration sure doesn’t.


18 posted on 10/15/2011 8:23:17 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: casablanca
and this from the Oct 27....

Asia Alert from The Wall Street Journal

When Western companies pulled back from Iran after the government's bloody crackdown on its citizens two years ago, a Chinese telecom giant filled the vacuum.

Huawei Technologies Co. now dominates Iran's government-controlled mobile-phone industry. In doing so, it plays a role in enabling Iran's state security network.

Huawei recently signed a contract to install equipment for a system at Iran's largest mobile-phone operator that allows police to track people based on the locations of their cellphones, according to interviews with telecom employees both in Iran and abroad, and corporate bidding documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal. It also has provided support for similar services at Iran's second-largest mobile-phone provider. Huawei notes that nearly all countries require police access to cell networks, including the U.S.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204644504576651503577823210.html?mod=djemalertAsianews

19 posted on 10/26/2011 9:31:29 PM PDT by Tenega
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To: All

A Look at Iran
http://www.truthusa.com/IRAN.html


20 posted on 10/31/2011 2:37:52 AM PDT by Cindy
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