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Major Security Firms Detect New Trojan Capable Of Disrupting Power Plants - Infrastructure
SHTF Plan ^ | 10-19-2011 | Mac Slavo

Posted on 10/19/2011 2:08:07 PM PDT by blam

Major Security Firms Detect New Trojan Capable Of Disrupting Power Plants, Oil Refineries and Other Critical Infrastructure Networks

Mac Slavo
October 19th, 2011

In our October 7, 2011 report There Have Been Intrusions, we noted that DHS Undersecretary Greg Shaffer warned that hackers and foreign governments are “knocking on the backdoor” of the networked systems which connect everything from infrastructure grid control systems to financial networks.

It now appears that our interconnected smart grid is actively under attack, as evidenced by a new Stuxnet-style trojan that has been detected by major cyber security leaders Symantec and McAfee. Much like its predecessor, the trojan dubbed “Duqu” is designed to infilitrate the networks that control everything from power production facilities to oil refineries. It is not yet clear exactly how the trojan operates, what its intended purpose is, or who designed it (though it is believed that the code for Duqu and Stuxnet likely originated with U.S. intelligence agencies). Both Symantec and McAfee continue to investigate the threat:

Security researchers have detected a new Trojan, scarily similar to the infamous Stuxnet worm, which could disrupt computers controlling power plants, oil refineries and other critical infrastructure networks.

The Trojan, dubbed “Duqu” by the security firm Symantec, appears, based on its code, to have been written by the same authors as the Stuxnet worm, which last July was used to cripple an Iranian nuclear-fuel processing plant.

“Duqu shares a great deal of code with Stuxnet; however, the payload is completely different,” researchers for the security firm Symantec wrote on its Security Response blog.

Instead of directly targeting the SCADA system, Duqu gathers “intelligence data and assets from entities, such as industrial control system manufacturers, in order to more easily conduct a future attack against another third party. The attackers are looking for information such as design documents that could help them mount a future attack on an industrial control facility.”

“Duqu is essentially the precursor to a future Stuxnet-like attack,” the researchers added.

Source: Fox News

You may recall that Stuxnet was so advanced that it crashed the physical centrifuges used to enrich uranium in Iran’s nuclear facilities. Stuxnet did this by exploiting software and hardware vulnerabilities, essentially reporting to Iranian research facility engineers that everything was functioning properly by controlling the software interface, while in the background it sent centrifuges spinning out of control to the point of hardware failure.

Duqu, which is apparently a similar piece of advanced code with a slightly different modus operandi, is not yet completely understood, but like Stuxnet in Iran, it is now actively functioning inside of critical infrastructure systems gathering information. To what end? The answer to that question may remain elusive until it’s too late.

In reportedly unrelated news, the Department of Homeland Security, in an unclassified National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center Bulletin (pdf), has issued warnings about the hacking group Anonymous and the possibility that they are becoming increasingly capable of targeting advanced Industrial Control Systems (ICS):

(U//FOUO) The information available on Anonymous suggests they currently have a limited ability to conduct attacks targeting ICS. However, experienced and skilled members of Anonymous in hacking could be able to develop capabilities to gain access and trespass on control system networks very quickly. Free educational opportunities (conferences, classes), presentations at hacker conferences, and other high profile events/media coverage have raised awareness to ICS vulnerabilities, and likely shortened the time needed to develop sufficient tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) to disrupt ICS. Control system exploits are released in common penetration testing software such as Metasploit release 4.0 that can be directly used with novice level skills in hacking and little to no background in control systems. Common packet inspection tools such as WireShark and Netmon have improved to the point where industrial protocols are supported minimizing the effectiveness of security-by-obscurity. In addition, there are control systems that are currently accessible directly from the Internet and easy to locate through internet search engine tools and applications. These systems could be easily located and accessed with minimal skills in order to trespass, carry out nefarious activities, or conduct reconnaissance activities to be used in future operations.

(U//FOUO) Anonymous has recently called on their members to target energy companies based on “Green Energy” initiative performance. This targeting could likely extend beyond Anonymous to the broader hacktivist community, resulting in larger-scope actions against energy companies. Asset owners and operators of critical infrastructure control systems are encouraged to engage in addressing the security needs of their control system assets.

Curiously, the Duqu trojan doesn’t seem to have originated from individual hackers or hacking groups, or foreign intelligence services. Rather, like Stuxnet, the virus was likely written under control and/or guidance of U.S. intelligence, possibly in collaboration with Israeli intelligence.

While DHS has issued warnings about Anonymous and other hacking groups potentially attacking the grid, someone – and it’s likely not a lone hacker or the Anonymous hacking group – is actively involved in probing for vulnerabilities in our infrastructure control systems. These are the systems that monitor and control our electricity, water supplies, gas pipelines, oil refineries, financial exchanges, and even certain military operations.

There seems to be no immediate danger at this time, as the Duqu trojan is reportedly gathering intelligence, as opposed to actively attempting to bring down the systems via a hardware style attack like Stuxnet.

But once it acquires all of the necessary information, such as personnel access codes, security certificates and a mapped layout of a particular grid infrastructure, it wouldn’t take much to take things to the next level.

Imagine for a moment the effect of an attack on major refining operations, cascading electrical outages, urban water purification systems that added excessive chemicals to water supplies, or the massive flooding that might result if a dam were compromised.

Or, consider that the U.S. drone fleet was recently attacked by an unknown trojan or malware, which was logging access commands and passwords for high security military systems. What would happen if an enemy of the people of the United States gained access to our entire drone fleet, weapons systems and all?

The possibilities for damage via compromised infrastructure systems would be nothing short of a digital apocalypse, with the potential to adversely affect the lives of tens of millions of unsuspecting Americans virtually overnight.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: getreadyhereitcomes; hackers; infrastructure; powerplants; prepperping; shtf; stuxnet; survivalping; terror; trojan
It's Always Something (IAS)
1 posted on 10/19/2011 2:08:15 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Key European Nuclear Firms Attacked By Variation On Stuxnet Virus

Adam Taylor
Oct. 19, 2011, 1:18 PM

Image: Flickr Swobodin

Several European firms that create software that controls industrial facilities, including nuclear reactors, have been hit by a virus that extracts information from their systems, The New York Times reports.

The virus, known as Duqu, appears to have been made by the same people who made the Stuxnet virus, an infamous cyber weapon that attacked the Iran nuclear program last summer.

Internet security organization Symantec describe Duqu on their website:

Duqu is essentially the precursor to a future Stuxnet-like attack. The threat was written by the same authors (or those that have access to the Stuxnet source code) and appears to have been created since the last Stuxnet file was recovered. Duqu's purpose is to gather intelligence data and assets from entities, such as industrial control system manufacturers, in order to more easily conduct a future attack against another third party. The attackers are looking for information such as design documents that could help them mount a future attack on an industrial control facility.

One key point outlined by Systemac is that whoever created the file has access to the source code of Stuxnet, and is likely the creator of the previous virus.

But who created Stuxnet? While initial reports suggested Israel, other reports suggested China or even the United States. Could any of them have an interest in European nuclear security?

Vikram Thakur of Symantec told the Times, “This is extremely sophisticated, this is cutting edge.”

2 posted on 10/19/2011 2:15:40 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
what A$$hole put these systems on the internet why are they not on a closed network?
3 posted on 10/19/2011 2:16:20 PM PDT by jrd
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To: blam

So if Norton and Symantec have identified it, then it’s a non - issue, just have either company roll out a script online that anyone can download for free to remove it, problem solved.


4 posted on 10/19/2011 2:16:41 PM PDT by IamCenny
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To: blam
U.S. Military Drones Infected With Mysterious Computer Virus
5 posted on 10/19/2011 2:18:58 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

Not much would cause SHTF here in America faster than a widespread and long term power outage, especially in highly urban areas.

I think such a scenario could cause some major civil disturbances because the ‘Yutes’ are already restless and when you add the fact that because of the economy people are already on edge it won’t take much to set things off.

Reminds me of one of my favorite quotes:

“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Siege of AR-558 (#7.8)” (1998)
Quark: Let me tell you something about Hew-mons, Nephew. They’re a wonderful, friendly people, as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people... will become as nasty and as violent as the most bloodthirsty Klingon. You don’t believe me? Look at those faces. Look in their eyes.

Today we have ‘yutes’ who roam our streets who are with out morals, without respect for law or life itself. They will look are you with the same ‘doll eyes’ a shark does before he eats you and they will feel no more compassion than the shark does.

That will be the test of many. Most preppers I know are Christian people and they will hesitate to do what they might have to do to stop the ‘yutes’. On the other hand the ‘yutes’ won’t think twice nor lose a minute of sleep, in fact they will smile and laugh about it.

For those who are just starting or are old hands at prepping you may find my Preparedness Manual helpfull. You can download it at:

http://www.tomeaker.com/kart/preparedness1i.pdf

For those of you who haven’t started already it’s time to prepare almost past time maybe. You needed to be stocking up on food guns, ammo, basic household supplies like soap, papergoods, cleaning supplies, good sturdy clothes including extra socks, underwear and extra shoes and boots, a extra couple changes of oil and filters for your car, tools, things you buy everyday start buying two and put one up.

As the LDS say “When the emergency is upon us the time for preparedness has past.”

Or as the bible says: A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it.
NIV Proverbs 22:3

Lastly this for the doubters and the scoffers.

“There is no greater disaster than to underestimate danger.

Underestimation can be fatal.”


6 posted on 10/19/2011 2:22:35 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers PING!!


7 posted on 10/19/2011 2:24:40 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: blam

Wow, that must be one big condom.


8 posted on 10/19/2011 2:29:56 PM PDT by Fledermaus (Romney as president will just destroy the country slower than Obama.)
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To: Fledermaus

Wow, that must be one big condom.
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
We appear to be on the same ‘page’ here. I couldn’t wait to scroll down here with some ‘cute quip’ about Super Prophylactics.

I wonder if Elaine would call it ‘sponge worthy’?


9 posted on 10/19/2011 2:35:21 PM PDT by xrmusn ((6/98) If govt involved, the more outlandish a scheme appears, the truer it probably is.)
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To: blam
Greg Shaffer warned that hackers and foreign governments are “knocking on the backdoor” of the networked systems which connect everything from infrastructure grid control systems to financial networks.

I wonder if our own experts are "knocking on the back door" of the systems of our enemies, like they do to us?

10 posted on 10/19/2011 2:35:32 PM PDT by Mark17 (California, where English is a foreign language)
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To: Kartographer
Maybe a few more of these, eh?

Iosat Potassium IodideTablets

The IOSAT Potassium Iodide Tablet works by saturating the thyroid with stable iodine so it will not absorb radioactive iodine released in the event of a nuclear accident. This 14-day supply is designed to protect an adult from the serious effects of radioactive iodine, which has a half-life of eight days. The IOSAT Potassium Iodide Tablets includes 14 130-mg tablets.

11 posted on 10/19/2011 2:38:21 PM PDT by blam
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To: IamCenny

LOL! Good one.


12 posted on 10/19/2011 2:50:19 PM PDT by FourPeas ("Maladjusted and wigging out is no way to go through life, son." -hg)
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End Of The Line?

That's Up To You

Donate

13 posted on 10/19/2011 2:51:14 PM PDT by DJ MacWoW (America! The wolves are here! What will you do?)
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To: blam

If Symantec said the sun rises in the morning I would have to look outside to verify it. They failed to provide a 2 year protection plan I paid in advance for and in fact refused to ever acknowledge a singe communication.

McAfee was caught developing viruses and shazzam creating a fix.


14 posted on 10/19/2011 3:04:23 PM PDT by Wurlitzer (Welcome to the new USSA (United Socialist States of Amerika))
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To: blam

If Symantec said the sun rises in the morning I would have to look outside to verify it. They failed to provide a 2 year protection plan I paid in advance for and in fact refused to ever acknowledge a single communication.

McAfee was caught developing viruses and shazzam creating a fix.


15 posted on 10/19/2011 3:04:58 PM PDT by Wurlitzer (Welcome to the new USSA (United Socialist States of Amerika))
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To: IamCenny
So if Norton and Symantec have identified it, then it’s a non - issue, just have either company roll out a script online that anyone can download for free to remove it, problem solved.

Maybe. Maybe not.

I would presume this is some sort of root kit based trojan. They are notoriously hard to get rid of. I doubt if a simple utility of any sort would do the job.

And I continue to wonder why Microsoft cannot protect their operating system from this sort of thing. Windows has been around for nearly 20 years and we are still fighting off virus, worm, malware and trojan attacks.

16 posted on 10/19/2011 3:30:19 PM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: blam

I wouldn’t worry about nukes. There are only a couple in the US that have changed over to any kind of computer control.


17 posted on 10/19/2011 3:57:29 PM PDT by wolfpat (Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. -- Cicero)
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To: InterceptPoint

It’s the nature of their OS. It was never made to be a security minded OS (multi-user with different privileges) in the first place. Security stuff was put in place later piecemeal but core OS designs prevented unix-level security being able to be implemented. Not saying unix systems are perfect, but they are far more robust and able to be secured better.


18 posted on 10/19/2011 4:01:49 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: InterceptPoint

Maybe so, but if the top anti-malware companies can identify this threat, it is certainly within their grasp to remove. If it’s such a big threat as portrayed in this article then the best of the best damn well better be working around the clock for a solution.


19 posted on 10/19/2011 4:51:32 PM PDT by IamCenny
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To: IamCenny
Maybe so, but if the top anti-malware companies can identify this threat, it is certainly within their grasp to remove.

I can't disagree with that but I've seem them fail to actually finish the job. McAfee sometimes detects the trojan, removes it and 10 minutes later does the same thing. Over and over.

What I go to when I have a serious trojan problem is majorgeeks.com. They have never failed to get rid any trojan that I've ever had. The service is free. It's run by very expert volunteers who are sticklers for procedure. Do exactly what they tell you to do and you will succeed. Don't and you won't.

20 posted on 10/19/2011 5:13:24 PM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: InterceptPoint

Interesting. Check out this link: http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00001393.html

This has been simmering since around since 2008, but seems to be exactly this type of thing. Very sophisticated, yet simple. Encrypted so it doesn’t have a footprint, residing in sectors on your drive that your OS doesn’t recognize, etc.

This link: http://www.ted.com/talks/mikko_hypponen_fighting_viruses_defending_the_net.html

is also interesting...I really detest the TED people, they are as liberal as the day is long, but this guy, Mikko Hypponen relates some very interesting stuff on viruses, malware and Internet crime.

Very interesting...I highly recommend it, even with the socialist bent at the end where he suggests getting jobs for programmers who haven’t gone criminal yet...(haha, what a laugher THAT idea is)


21 posted on 10/19/2011 5:14:15 PM PDT by rlmorel (9/11: Aggression is attracted to weakness like sharks are to blood, and we were weak. We still are.)
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To: InterceptPoint

I worked in the Microsoft operating system development team for several years. Part of the fun was working with smart foreign nationals from all kinds of interesting places. Sometimes when you got to know them well enough to ask what they did before they came to the US, you could get quite a shock. For example, an ICBM launch officer from USSR. I’ve often wondered how you could ever vet these people adequately.


22 posted on 10/19/2011 5:16:48 PM PDT by c-five
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To: IamCenny; InterceptPoint

Heck, I figured I might as well paste the whole thing in from the first link:

News broke out earlier this year (My Note: this was March 2008) of a new breed of rootkit using techniques never before seen in modern malware. The most notable of them is the fact that the rootkit replaces the infected system’s Master Boot Record (MBR).

The MBR is the first physical sector of the hard drive and contains the first code loaded and executed from the drive during the boot process.

In the competition between rootkits and rootkit detectors, the first to execute has the upper hand. And you can’t execute earlier than from the MBR. Of course, MBR viruses used to be very common in the DOS days, 15 years ago or so. But this is 2008.

This new Windows MBR rootkit launches itself very early during the Windows startup process without requiring any registry or file modifications. In fact, it is quite surprising that it’s possible to write to the MBR from within Windows to begin with.

The MBR rootkit — known as “Mebroot” — is very advanced and probably the stealthiest malware we have seen so far. It keeps the amount of system modifications to a minimum and is very challenging to detect from within the infected system.

Below are some details about the MBR rootkit’s stealth features:

The ntoskrnl.exe module hook that executes the kernel-mode downloader payload is set to the nt!Phase1Initialization function which resides in the INIT section. This means that after the system has initialized the section is wiped out from memory and no sign of the hook is any longer present.

The rootkit stores data that’s required to survive reboots in physical sectors instead of files. This means that the data, including the real payload, is not visible or in any way accessible to normal applications. Therefore the rootkit does not have to hook the normal set of interfaces to keep them hidden.

The MBR is the rootkit’s launch point. Therefore it doesn’t need to make any registry changes or to modify any existing startup executables in order to launch itself. This means that the only hooks it needs to make are used to hide and protect the modified MBR. Essentially this means that the rootkit hooks only two DWORDs from the disk.sys driver object which is shown in the picture below.

Another interesting feature of the MBR rootkit that has not received very much public discussion is its networking layer and firewall bypassing capabilities. One reason for this might be that this part of Mebroot’s code is heavily obfuscated and time consuming to analyze.

It is known that the rootkit’s main purpose is to act as an ultimate downloader. To be stealthy and effective it is essential that the rootkit does not trigger nor is blocked by personal firewalls. It is able to achieve this by operating in the lowest parts of the NDIS layer just above the physical hardware.

Only a single DWORD is hooked at all times from the NDIS internal structures. To send packets the rootkit uses the SendPacketsHandler function implemented by the actual hardware specific driver.

The rootkit uses its own unmodified versions of NDIS API functions it needs to operate. This has been done before by some malware, such as Rustock and Srizbi. However, what we have not seen before is the fact that the MBR rootkit uses a “code pullout” technique to only load the relevant code from the ndis.sys driver instead of loading the whole ndis.sys driver as its private module into memory.

This means that the memory fingerprint of the malware is smaller and there are no additional modules loaded into the system address space which might trigger some forensic tools.

This malware is very professionally written and produced. Which of course means it’s not written for fun. Initial samples from December 2007 and January 2008 were at beta stage. Now it appears that the malware is fully-baked and more active distribution has begun. During the weekend our Security Lab started to receive information about multiple drive-by exploit sites spreading the latest version. (However, at the moment these attacks cannot be considered as widespread.)

The actual site hosting the exploit code utilizes the following exploits:

Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) Function vulnerability (MS06-014)
AOL SuperBuddy ActiveX Control Code Execution vulnerability (CVE-2006-5820)
Online Media Technologies NCTsoft NCTAudioFile2 ActiveX Buffer Overflow (CVE-2007-0018)
GOM Player “GomWeb3” ActiveX Control Buffer Overflow (CVE-2007-5779)
Microsoft Internet Explorer WebViewFolderIcon setSlice (CVE-2006-3730)
Yahoo! JukeBox datagrid.dll AddButton() Buffer Overflow
DirectAnimation.PathControl KeyFrame vulnerability (CVE-2006-4777)
Microsoft DirectSpeechSynthesis Module Remote Buffer Overflow

Proof of concept code for two of the exploits was publicly disclosed just less than a month ago.

The downloaded payloads seem to clearly target online banking and other financial systems.

We detect the latest MBR rootkit variant as Backdoor.Win32.Sinowal.Y.
The exploit site is currently resolving to an IP address of 216.245.195.114 and seems to still be active.


23 posted on 10/19/2011 5:19:58 PM PDT by rlmorel (9/11: Aggression is attracted to weakness like sharks are to blood, and we were weak. We still are.)
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To: rlmorel

Thanks for the links. The MBR replacement scheme looks really scary to me. I’m not sure how you deal with that.

And the TED video was quite good. If you watched closely you would have heard him say that they can now embed malware in a .jpg. Click on the .jpg and infect your computer. Yikes.

I like TED despite it’s obvious leftist tilt. Very professionally done. Actually a valuable resource.


24 posted on 10/19/2011 5:40:36 PM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: InterceptPoint
It was interesting...my brother and I were just discussing this subject last night (before this thread started) and we did some fishing around. (He has run his own PC repair business for nearly the last decade, much of it remediating malware and viruses, so he has done hand to hand combat with a LOT of variations) From what he and I could gather...

NOBODY seems to know what to do or how to deal with this particular kind of thing. (Perhaps some more knowledgeable person on this thread might know a bit more...)

I found that paucity of follow-up information a little disturbing. The key verbiage from that website I thought was this:

The rootkit stores data that’s required to survive reboots in physical sectors instead of files. This means that the data, including the real payload, is not visible or in any way accessible to normal applications. Therefore the rootkit does not have to hook the normal set of interfaces to keep them hidden.

The MBR is the rootkit’s launch point. Therefore it doesn’t need to make any registry changes or to modify any existing startup executables in order to launch itself. This means that the only hooks it needs to make are used to hide and protect the modified MBR.

25 posted on 10/19/2011 5:53:43 PM PDT by rlmorel (9/11: Aggression is attracted to weakness like sharks are to blood, and we were weak. We still are.)
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To: rlmorel

Why can’t they make a removal/replacement software to run during bios pre-boot? Seems likely to me, that if you can detect the malware, you can remove it. Such as off a flash drive, cd, or external hard drive?


26 posted on 10/19/2011 6:14:08 PM PDT by IamCenny
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To: jrd

While initial reports suggested Israel, other reports suggested China or even the United States-—

I dunno, I have a hard time thinking the U.S. would name such a thing as Duqu..but that’s just me..


27 posted on 10/19/2011 6:42:01 PM PDT by Freddd (NoPA ngineers.)
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To: IamCenny

I get the impression that part of the problem is...you cannot detect it.


28 posted on 10/19/2011 6:51:58 PM PDT by rlmorel (9/11: Aggression is attracted to weakness like sharks are to blood, and we were weak. We still are.)
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To: rlmorel

Right, I read that, but that was back in 2008, and if I’m reading correctly this is the same type of malware used years ago when dos was prevalent in Windows OS. So it’s been about 3 years since this article was written and still undetectable? They know enough to know that it’s infected infrastructure software throughout the US but they can’t detect it? I don’t buy it.


29 posted on 10/19/2011 7:31:59 PM PDT by IamCenny
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To: blam; ShadowAce
Instead of directly targeting the SCADA system, Duqu gathers “intelligence data and assets from entities, such as industrial control system manufacturers, in order to more easily conduct a future attack against another third party. The attackers are looking for information such as design documents that could help them mount a future attack on an industrial control facility.”

Doesn't that sound more 'Chinese-like'?

30 posted on 10/19/2011 7:39:31 PM PDT by GOPJ (OWS - a scam to shift blame for unemployment and misery away from Obama..)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

31 posted on 10/20/2011 6:29:53 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

32 posted on 10/20/2011 6:30:45 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: blam
There seems to be no immediate danger at this time, as the Duqu trojan is reportedly gathering intelligence

Not dangerous? Really? Information is power. One access code and you're inside and capable of doing anything.

33 posted on 10/20/2011 8:21:22 AM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
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To: Wurlitzer

Symantec stinks. Does nothing but crash and slow things down. Never again.


34 posted on 10/20/2011 8:30:25 AM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
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