Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Bank Of America Dumps $75 Trillion In Derivatives On U.S. Taxpayers With Federal Approval
http://seekingalpha.com/article/301260-bank-of-america-dumps-75-trillion-in-derivatives-on-u-s-taxpayers-with-federal-approval ^

Posted on 10/24/2011 8:10:44 AM PDT by TigerClaws

Bloomberg reports that Bank of America (BAC) has shifted about $22 trillion worth of derivative obligations from Merrill Lynch and the BAC holding company to the FDIC insured retail deposit division. Along with this information came the revelation that the FDIC insured unit was already stuffed with $53 trillion worth of these potentially toxic obligations, making a total of $75 trillion.

(Excerpt) Read more at seekingalpha.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bankofamerica; blogpimp; boa; bofa; bofaderivatives; corruption; derivatives; fdic; frankturek; fraud; taxes; turek
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-76 next last

1 posted on 10/24/2011 8:10:49 AM PDT by TigerClaws
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

“Along with this information came the revelation that the FDIC insured unit was already stuffed with $53 trillion worth of these potentially toxic obligations, making a total of $75 trillion.”

I’m no real estate expert, but I’d say that is a lot.


2 posted on 10/24/2011 8:13:02 AM PDT by jessduntno ("They say the world has become too complex for simple answers... they are wrong." - RR)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

“Dead Beats” FUALT!


3 posted on 10/24/2011 8:14:44 AM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Um... The GOVERNMENT is accepting this crappy deal

and ONLY the government is big enough to do something this stupid.

If the government is stupid enough to do it, I don’t blame the banks for taking advantage of it. They have to live in the real world of existing rules.


4 posted on 10/24/2011 8:16:25 AM PDT by Mr. K (We need a TEA Party march on GOP headquarters ~!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Is there that much money in the entire world?..........


5 posted on 10/24/2011 8:18:07 AM PDT by Red Badger (Obama's number one economics advisor must be a Magic Eight Ball.................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

There is ZERO chance the net obligation is anything like that. Surprised Alpha isn’t clear on that.


6 posted on 10/24/2011 8:19:22 AM PDT by major-pelham
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Oh I’m sure we’ll be able to suck that up in no time/sarc


7 posted on 10/24/2011 8:20:44 AM PDT by vanilla swirl (We are the Patrick Henry we have been waiting for!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Every $5T in todays dollars represents the amount of money spent by FedGov™ on WWII in the 1940’s.


8 posted on 10/24/2011 8:23:23 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

I find it difficult to believe there is 75 trillion worth of vacant real estate out there. I wonder what percentage of these holdings are currently occupied for free and whether ACORN (or whatever they’re calling themselves now) is involved in it.


9 posted on 10/24/2011 8:24:02 AM PDT by liberalh8ter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws; ding_dong_daddy_from_dumas; stephenjohnbanker; DoughtyOne; calcowgirl; Gilbo_3; ...
RE :"The FDIC opposed the move, but there is nothing the FDIC can do, except file a petition for a writ of mandamus in court, against the Federal Reserve, seeking a declaration that the approval was illegal. But, the FDIC would lose, because Congress has given the Federal Reserve Board ultimate power to do whatever it wishes. So, the bottom line is this: When something bad happens, and the derivative obligations are triggered, the FDIC will be on the hook, thanks to the Federal Reserve. The counter-parties of Bank of America, both inside America and elsewhere around the world, will be safely bailed out by the full faith and credit of the USA. Meanwhile, the taxpayers and dollar denominated savers will be fleeced again. "

????

10 posted on 10/24/2011 8:24:20 AM PDT by sickoflibs (Cain :"My parents didn't raise me to beg the government for other peoples money")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Let’s see...

We have a national total including future unfunded liabilities of about $130 trillion dollars. Throw in $75 trillion in derivatives and we are over $200 trillion.

Nice!!!!


11 posted on 10/24/2011 8:24:51 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws
This latest example of misconduct illustrates the error of allowing a bank-controlled entity, like the Federal Reserve, complete power over the nation's monetary system.

The FED was the cornerstone of Progressive plans for Gov't. The FED must be neutered.

12 posted on 10/24/2011 8:25:14 AM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded my brains fell out)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws
A key excerpt:

The FDIC opposed the move, but there is nothing the FDIC can do, except file a petition for a writ of mandamus in court, against the Federal Reserve, seeking a declaration that the approval was illegal. But, the FDIC would lose, because Congress has given the Federal Reserve Board ultimate power to do whatever it wishes.

So, the bottom line is this: When something bad happens, and the derivative obligations are triggered, the FDIC will be on the hook, thanks to the Federal Reserve. The counter-parties of Bank of America, both inside America and elsewhere around the world, will be safely bailed out by the full faith and credit of the USA. Meanwhile, the taxpayers and dollar denominated savers will be fleeced again. This latest example of misconduct illustrates the error of allowing a bank-controlled entity, like the Federal Reserve, complete power over the nation's monetary system. The so-called "reforms" enacted by Congress, in the wake of the 2008 crash, have vested more, and not less, power in the Federal Reserve, and supplied us with more, rather than less instability and problems.

This is not an isolated instance. JP Morgan Chase (JPM) is being allowed to house its unstable derivative obligations within its FDIC insured retail banking unit. Other big banks do the same. So long as the Federal Reserve exists and/or other financial regulatory agencies continue to be run by a revolving door staff that moves in and out of industry and government, crony capitalism will be alive and well in America. No amount of Dodd-Frank or Volcker rule legislation will ever protect savers, taxpayers or the American people. Profits will continue to be privatized and losses socialized.

 

13 posted on 10/24/2011 8:26:54 AM PDT by EternalVigilance
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

What’s a few Trillion more that we can’t pay back?


14 posted on 10/24/2011 8:29:54 AM PDT by broken_arrow1 (I regret that I have but one life to give for my country - Nathan Hale "Patriot")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws
Don't really know what this means but sounds like BofA is about to go belly up or at least another bailout. Both sounds like we are taking another hit.
15 posted on 10/24/2011 8:30:11 AM PDT by Logical me
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: major-pelham; All

it’s still very bad for us.

...just like Ireland.
the Irish people,
were about the MOST debt-free,
in all of Europe.

then the politicians changed the law,
to make the taxpayers liable for the bank’s
derivitive screw-ups.

...the rest is history.

now, the same is happening to us.


16 posted on 10/24/2011 8:30:14 AM PDT by Elendur (It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. - Thomas Jefferson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

With Bernyankme’s approval....


17 posted on 10/24/2011 8:35:44 AM PDT by b4its2late ("Pray for Obama. Psalm 109:8")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mr. K

“If the government is stupid enough to do it, I don’t blame the banks for taking advantage of it.”

That is the point of the whole article. The players “behind the scenes” i.e. the executives that are getting the 20 million dollar bonuses move in and out of government writing the rules, and Congress has been bought and paid for.

I’d love to have a sweet deal where if I make money I keep the profits but if I lose money the taxpayers pay for it.

The OWS idiots are correct about one thing, there is much rotten on Wall Street, but the stench originates from the Potomac, not the Hudson.


18 posted on 10/24/2011 8:35:54 AM PDT by bitterohiogunclinger (Proudly casting a heavy carbon footprint as I clean my guns ---)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno

To know whether it’s “a lot” we’d have to know what the net is.

E.g., if I bet $4.99 that the 49ers will win and then, to hedge that, bet $5.01 that the 49ers will lose, the “total” bet is $10, but the “net” (potential loss) is $.02. This is what derivatives are “supposed” to do (hedge other bets). Unfortunately, many derivatives aren’t structured in this “win-lose” fashion, but can end up “lose-lose”.

Of course the main point of the article that connected bankers use corrupt politicians to cover their behinds is still valid.


19 posted on 10/24/2011 8:36:41 AM PDT by PhilosopherStone1000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Would this be considered more LOOTING of the American people? $75 Trillion!!!!


20 posted on 10/24/2011 8:37:04 AM PDT by drypowder
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

This has to be satire. I firmly believe the problem is too big for the worlds governemnts/economies to do anything to stop this train wreck, but those numbers are an order of magnitude worse than I thought things were.

When you surprise the “doom and gloomers” with bad news, you KNOW we are in a world of hurt.


21 posted on 10/24/2011 8:39:54 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Sounds like a game of hide the salami. The toxic derivatives are still toxic and it is just a question of shifting the corpse around so that eventually it lands on the door of the Fed and ultimately the taxpayer who will ultimately pay for the losses.


22 posted on 10/24/2011 8:39:54 AM PDT by chuckee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: major-pelham

>> There is ZERO chance the net obligation is anything like that.

What if the net obligation is only five percent of $75 trillion?

That’s still three trillion seven-hundred-fifty billion dollars of taxpayer exposure. Two full years of Obama-esque deficits.

Is that acceptable?

If you don’t like five percent as the number, then what number do you prefer?

*Whatever* the risk level of this crapola, I should think that BAC shareholders and bondholders ought to be on the hook — not depositors and the taxpayer by way of the FDIC.


23 posted on 10/24/2011 8:41:20 AM PDT by Nervous Tick (Trust in God, but row away from the rocks!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: PhilosopherStone1000
Don't worry. I'm sure the republican politicians will protect us from this.


24 posted on 10/24/2011 8:45:13 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: jessduntno

75 Trillion...

Sooner or later they are going to be talking about some real money!


25 posted on 10/24/2011 8:49:21 AM PDT by montomike (Politics should be about service and not a lucrative, money-making opportunity!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Nervous Tick
I think the net obligation is actually around 5% from some of the articles I'm reading, which is still a massive amount that the FDIC couldn't possibly insure. Between BoA and JP Morgan, I read that they have over 125 Trillion in derivatives and there's around $700 Trillion globally. Most of these are insurance, interest driven, or things that will not implode, but even if the listed number of 5% could go toxic that would kill off what's left of the global economy.
26 posted on 10/24/2011 8:50:06 AM PDT by aegiscg47
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws
Here why everyone is freaking out about BofA moving it's derivatives

The above article is a little more balanced approach. Some things should be noted.


27 posted on 10/24/2011 8:51:59 AM PDT by DannyTN
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Have read that the bottom number for this crap is 650 trillion. With a high of such a large number it exceeds a bazillion. Send phil gramm a thank you note.
28 posted on 10/24/2011 8:54:30 AM PDT by org.whodat (Just another heartless American, hated by Perry and his fellow demorats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

From an old article regarding collateralized-debt obligations or CDO’s

http://broadcatching.wordpress.com/2009/04/06/matt-taiibi-the-big-takeover-rolling-stone-magazine/
(Snip)
The best way to understand the financial crisis is to understand the meltdown at AIG. AIG is what happens when short, bald managers of otherwise boring financial bureaucracies start seeing Brad Pitt in the mirror. This is a company that built a giant fortune across more than a century by betting on safety-conscious policyholders — people who wear seat belts and build houses on high ground — and then blew it all in a year or two by turning their entire balance sheet over to a guy who acted like making huge bets with other people’s money would make his d*ck bigger.

That guy — the Patient Zero of the global economic meltdown — was one Joseph Cassano, the head of a tiny, 400-person unit within the company called AIG Financial Products, or AIGFP. Cassano, a pudgy, balding Brooklyn College grad with beady eyes and way too much forehead, cut his teeth in the Eighties working for Mike Milken, the granddaddy of modern Wall Street debt alchemists. Milken, who pioneered the creative use of junk bonds, relied on messianic genius and a whole array of insider schemes to evade detection while wreaking financial disaster. Cassano, by contrast, was just a greedy little t*rd with a knack for selective accounting who ran his scam right out in the open, thanks to Washington’s deregulation of the Wall Street casino. “It’s all about the regulatory environment,” says a government source involved with the AIG bailout. “These guys look for holes in the system, for ways they can do trades without government interference. Whatever is unregulated, all the action is going to pile into that.”

The mess Cassano created had its roots in an investment boom fueled in part by a relatively new type of financial instrument called a collateralized-debt obligation. A CDO is like a box full of diced-up assets. They can be anything: mortgages, corporate loans, aircraft loans, credit-card loans, even other CDOs. So as X mortgage holder pays his bill, and Y corporate debtor pays his bill, and Z credit-card debtor pays his bill, money flows into the box.

The key idea behind a CDO is that there will always be at least some money in the box, regardless of how dicey the individual assets inside it are. No matter how you look at a single unemployed ex-con trying to pay the note on a six-bedroom house, he looks like a bad investment. But dump his loan in a box with a smorgasbord of auto loans, credit-card debt, corporate bonds and other crap, and you can be reasonably sure that somebody is going to pay up. Say $100 is supposed to come into the box every month. Even in an apocalypse, when $90 in payments might default, you’ll still get $10. What the inventors of the CDO did is divide up the box into groups of investors and put that $10 into its own level, or “tranche.” They then convinced ratings agencies like Moody’s and S&P to give that top tranche the highest AAA rating — meaning it has close to zero credit risk.

Suddenly, thanks to this financial seal of approval, banks had a way to turn their sh*ttiest mortgages and other financial waste into investment-grade paper and sell them to institutional investors like pensions and insurance companies, which were forced by regulators to keep their portfolios as safe as possible. Because CDOs offered higher rates of return than truly safe products like Treasury bills, it was a win-win: Banks made a fortune selling CDOs, and big investors made much more holding them.

The problem was, none of this was based on reality. “The banks knew they were selling crap,” says a London-based trader from one of the bailed-out companies. To get AAA ratings, the CDOs relied not on their actual underlying assets but on crazy mathematical formulas that the banks cooked up to make the investments look safer than they really were. “They had some back room somewhere where a bunch of Indian guys who’d been doing nothing but math for God knows how many years would come up with some kind of model saying that this or that combination of debtors would only default once every 10,000 years,” says one young trader who sold CDOs for a major investment bank. “It was nuts.”


29 posted on 10/24/2011 8:55:48 AM PDT by listenhillary (Look your representatives in the eye and ask if they intend to pay off the debt. They will look away)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

In my layman’s opinion, there is NOTHING that will do as much damage to the world economy as derivatives. We have turned the world banking system into a casino for banks where the banks take the profit and the citizens eat the losses. Sounds familiar, right?

It is the same scheme. The only difference is the staggering amounts of money involved and how these instruments tie the system together. If the housing collapse set off a big bomb in the world banking system the derivatives will be a full scale nuclear war followed by nuclear winter. The numbers are that big.

If you think the folks on this thread sound nutty and outlandishly paranoid you have not studied derivatives. I urge you to take an hour to gain an understanding of the threat we face. The numbers dwarf the entire U.S. economy and the world economy. There is no possibility that the world could cover the losses or that the major banks would stay solvent.

I am sure others will correct me and it’s simplistic but think about derivatives as the mortgage backed securities that became worthless when the housing market imploded. However, the numbers we are talking about for the total derivatives market are 100 times greater than real estate instruments. It is all digital money, right?

Fire or flame away and by all means add your own .02.


30 posted on 10/24/2011 8:55:51 AM PDT by volunbeer (Keep the dope, we'll make the change in 2012!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Is there that much money in the entire world?..........

Not any more.

31 posted on 10/24/2011 8:58:01 AM PDT by TruthShallSetYouFree ("Nanny Care State" is not a Division 3 football powerhouse.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: org.whodat

Derivatives should be made illegal...........


32 posted on 10/24/2011 8:58:17 AM PDT by Red Badger (Obama's number one economics advisor must be a Magic Eight Ball.................)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Is there that much money in the entire world?..........

20% of it all.

33 posted on 10/24/2011 9:02:04 AM PDT by Walmartian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: listenhillary
Great "blast from the past" article...thanks..

Allow me to reiminisce further...Before CDOs, there were CMO's..restricted only to mortages..albeit many of lousy credit worthiness. That's where the word "tranche" was first applied...and "tranche" is a French word that means "open running sewer.."

How very appropriate..

34 posted on 10/24/2011 9:03:41 AM PDT by ken5050 (Cain/Gingrich 2012!!! because sharing a couch with Pelosi is NOT the same as sharing a bed with her)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger

I did a web study on the _value_ of everything in the world; found nothing comprehensive but a reasonable estimate seems to be $1 Quadrillion (1,000 Trillion).


35 posted on 10/24/2011 9:12:12 AM PDT by veracious
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

BFLR


36 posted on 10/24/2011 9:20:43 AM PDT by Avalon Hussar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Do You Want FR To Survive?


Click The Starving Forum Skeleton To Donate

Then Support Your Forum

37 posted on 10/24/2011 9:20:51 AM PDT by DJ MacWoW (America! The wolves are here! What will you do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: veracious

Cloward and Piven would happily point out that derivatives will truly “collapse the system.”


38 posted on 10/24/2011 9:27:03 AM PDT by volunbeer (Keep the dope, we'll make the change in 2012!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: volunbeer
There is no possibility that the world could cover the losses

I don't get this. The world is a closed system.

39 posted on 10/24/2011 9:35:41 AM PDT by Darth Reardon (No offense to drunken sailors)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Much of America would never have been built without financial derivatives such as futures and options contracts, due to excessive risk. Of course, some derivatives are more exotic and non-linear in design, but they are hardly dangerous in and of themselves.

The problem isn't really the instruments - rather, it is one of excessive leverage and socialization of risk. When governments assume the risk of adverse financial events in place of private parties (the big banks, for example), moral hazard inevitably follows, and disaster beyond that.

40 posted on 10/24/2011 9:50:01 AM PDT by andy58-in-nh (America does not need to be organized: it needs to be liberated.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws
Meanwhile, the taxpayers and dollar denominated savers will be fleeced again.

"Fleeced"? How about "Raped, drawn and quartered and the remains burned to an ash"?

I'll warrant a lot of these derivatives bet (and I used that term advisedly) against the Eurobonds failing, and we all know how that's going to turn out.

41 posted on 10/24/2011 9:54:48 AM PDT by Oatka ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." –Bertrand de Jouvenel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Oatka

On second thought, maybe we don’t have to worry. No doubt there are derivatives that bet that these derivatives will fail.

Tongue only slightly in cheek.


42 posted on 10/24/2011 9:57:22 AM PDT by Oatka ("A society of sheep must in time beget a government of wolves." –Bertrand de Jouvenel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Is there that much money in the entire world?..........

There isn't. It's all play money and figments of someone's sick imagination. The money in your wallet may not even be worth the paper it's printed on in a few short years. Remember the value of Confederate dollars after the CW. One day it's all going to collapse be it war or self implosion of the financial system. The triggers have already been set and we're seeing that now. It's only a matter of time before the whole thing blows up in their faces. And of course, the US taxpayer is going to be stuck holding the bag.

43 posted on 10/24/2011 10:00:06 AM PDT by bgill (There, happy now?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

Socialize the losses (and convince the general public each time that the concept of free markets is a crock).

Very, very bad.


44 posted on 10/24/2011 10:04:36 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EternalVigilance

And here I was worried about paying off my student loans.

The entire game is rigged, from top to bottom.


45 posted on 10/24/2011 10:09:05 AM PDT by Soothesayer9
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: EternalVigilance

BTTT!!!


46 posted on 10/24/2011 10:09:52 AM PDT by Pagey (B. Hussein Obama has no experience running anything, except his pedestrian mouth.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: liberalh8ter

I don’t think this is about Foreclosures or real estate.

I think is is about the gambling aspect of derivatives.


47 posted on 10/24/2011 10:27:48 AM PDT by ridesthemiles
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Jack Hydrazine

What’s the difference? 140 t, 200 t, might as well be a quintillion or septillion. It’s all Pixies and Fairie Dust. It will NEVER be repayed. It’s just a question WHEN not IF the entire rotten structure goes down.


48 posted on 10/24/2011 10:40:41 AM PDT by Kozak ("It's not an Election it's a Restraining Order" .....PJ O'Rourke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Red Badger
Whoever allowed the bankster gangsters to be joined at the hip to the equally corrupt federal gov.(that prints fiat money...with the taxpayer holding the bag)...should rot in hell.

Together what they do is equivalent to me taking stacks of $100 bills(printed from my Lexmark)and buying property and other investments with it(throw in some charity gifts to hide the smell of course).

If I do it, and get caught, I go to jail(gov. calls THAT counterfeiting)....unless I've got political friends...then I simply share my ill-gotten-gains with them and we simply enjoy our wine and prostitutes...with the taxpayer(AKA suckers)stuck with the tab.

What Bernie Madoff did was romper room stuff compared to the evil %$#@ that has yet to hit the fan.

These scumbags need to be exposed....drained of all their wealth(their families be damned)...then hung.

49 posted on 10/24/2011 10:44:28 AM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (I prefer liberty with danger to peace with slavery, IXNAY THE TSA!...P.S. Why did FR ZOT Frantzie?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: TigerClaws

What comes after a “trillion”???

“quadrillion”???

then

“pentillion”???

Geesh...


50 posted on 10/24/2011 10:46:45 AM PDT by stevie_d_64 (I'm jus' sayin')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-76 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson