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Endless Evil: The Drug War’s Continuing Collateral Damage, Part 1
Future of Freedom Foundation ^ | October 27, 2011 | Radley Balko

Posted on 10/30/2011 11:58:33 AM PDT by bamahead

In September 2009, 28-year-old Jonathan Ayers pulled into a gas station in Stephens County, Georgia, to withdraw money from an ATM. Ayers, a pastor, had just given $23, all the cash he had in his pocket, to Johanna Barrett, a drug addict alleged to be a prostitute to whom Ayers had been ministering. His purpose was to help Barrett pay rent at the motel where she was living with her boyfriend. According to friends and family members, it wasn’t unusual for Ayers to give the money he was carrying to help those to whom he was ministering get out of a jam.

Shortly after Ayers returned to his car from the ATM, a black Escalade tore into the parking lot. Three police officers, all undercover, got out of the vehicle and raced toward Ayers’s car. The startled pastor started his car and attempted to flee the parking lot. As he pulled out of the gas station, his vehicle grazed Officer Chance Oxner. Officer Billy Shane Harrison opened fire, putting a bullet through Ayers’s window that struck the pastor in the stomach. Ayers continued to drive, fleeing down the road for about a thousand yards before eventually crashing his car. He died at the hospital. His last words to his family and medical staff were that he thought he was being robbed. The police found no illicit drugs in his car, and there was no trace of any illegal substance in his body.

The police officers were part of a multi-jurisdictional drug task force. They had been following Barrett, who they say was selling small amounts of illicit drugs to support her own habit. They latched on to Ayers when they saw him hand her money while she was under surveillance. Rather than investigate further, at which point they would have discovered that Ayers was a pastor with no criminal history, they chose to confront him as if he were a violent fugitive on the lam. Subsequent investigations by the DA’s office and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation found no wrongdoing on the part of the police. It took a lawsuit by Ayers’s widow and some reporting from a local TV news reporter to discover that Harrison, the officer who shot Ayers, had received no training in the use of lethal force. In fact, he had so little training that under Georgia law he wasn’t legally permitted to carry a gun or work as an active-duty police officer. Even now, while Abigail Ayers’s lawsuit is still pending, there has been no disciplinary action taken against the officers involved in Jonathan Ayers’s death. He is collateral damage in America’s drug war.

Ayers’s story is too familiar. Consider Isaac Singletary, an 80-year-old man shot and killed by undercover police in Jacksonville, Florida, in 2008. The cops were posing as drug dealers, soliciting clients from Singletary’s front lawn. When Singletary came out of his home with a rifle to scare off what he thought were loitering drug pushers, the undercover cops panicked and killed him. Once again, no one was to blame. Jacksonville Sheriff John Rutherford described Singletary as “an honest citizen trying to do good.” Gov. Charlie Crist of Florida called Singletary’s death one of the “challenges in fighting crime.” The officers who killed Singletary were cleared of any blame.

There are more examples, from just the last few years. In January of this year, 68-year-old Eurie Stamps was killed by the Framingham, Massachusetts, SWAT team that raided his home. Stamps wasn’t a suspect and he wasn’t armed. In fact, the police nabbed the two suspects they were looking for — the son of Stamps’s live-in girlfriend and a friend of his — outside the house.

In 2008, Gonzalo Guizan was shot and killed by a SWAT team raiding the Easton, Connecticut, home of Ronald Terebesi Jr. Police were acting on a tip from a prostitute that Terebesi was using (not selling) cocaine. Guizan’s family says Guizan was visiting Terebesi to discuss their opening a business together. Guizan was shot when he ran toward the invading police officers as they broke into the home.

Also in 2008, a police officer in Lima, Ohio, shot and killed 26-year-old Tarika Wilson during a drug raid targeting Wilson’s boyfriend. As one officer shot and killed the boyfriend’s dogs, another officer mistook those shots for hostile gunfire. That officer then emptied his weapon into the bedroom where Wilson was on her knees, holding her infant son, complying with the officers’ orders. Wilson was killed. Her son lost use of his right hand.

When Richard Nixon first uttered the phrase “war on drugs” in 1971, he didn’t choose those words by accident. Government declarations of war signal to the country that the threat it is facing is so perilous, so grave, so existential, that in order to defeat it, Americans should prepare to give up basic freedoms, make significant sacrifices, and accept the inevitable collateral damage they may endure on “their” way to victory. Whatever one may think about the justness and morality of America’s actual wars, they were at least all predicated on the idea that the United States faced an enemy that threatened its very way of life. (Of course, that was true only in a small number of cases.) The drug war doesn’t even put up that sort of pretense. Elected officials argue — and Americans have mostly played along — that all of this sacrifice, erosion of civil liberties, and collateral damage are necessary to ... keep people from getting high.

The “war on drugs” metaphor grew increasingly literal during the Reagan administration. And through Reagan’s, Clinton’s, both Bushes’, and Obama’s administration, both major political parties have only inflated and doubled down on what has arguably been the most destructive and wasteful government policy of the last 40 years. The drug war touches nearly every area of American life, and distorts nearly all facets of American public policy. But there are a few examples of where drug prohibition has done more damage than others.

Police militarization

In May 2010, a video of a drug raid in Columbia, Missouri, made its way to the Internet and went viral. In it, a SWAT team uses a battering ram to force its way into a home after nightfall. Within seconds, shots ring out. You next hear the screeches of a dying dog, followed by the protesting wails of homeowner Jonathan Whitworth upon learning that the police had shot and killed one of his dogs and wounded the other. The video then shows police rounding up Whitworth, his wife, and their young son at gunpoint. Whitworth is handcuffed and arrested. The police found only a small amount of marijuana in the home, not even enough to charge him with a misdemeanor. (Marijuana had been decriminalized in Columbia.)

Reaction to the video was fascinating. People from all over the country — indeed the world — condemned the Columbia Police Department for the violent tactics. The department was inundated with email, phone calls, and faxes. Within days, more than a million people watched the video on YouTube. But the interesting thing is that there was nothing unusual about that video. Everything about it was standard procedure, from the battering ram, to the paramilitary gear to the perfunctory slaughter of the dog. Raids just like it happen dozens of times each day in the United States. It was as if America had suddenly realized just how militant its war on drugs really was. The outrage was encouraging, but such invasions have been going on for a generation. And while reaction to the video did effect some modest reforms in Columbia, it had almost no substantive effect outside the city.

The proliferation of SWAT teams began in the 1980s. America’s long (and wise) constraint on using the military for domestic policing, codified in the post–Civil War Posse Comitatus Act, began to blur as states deployed National Guard troops to search for marijuana hidden in fields and forests and, in some cases, to patrol drug-riddled inner cities. The line between cop and soldier further blurred when Ronald Reagan authorized active-duty elite military units to train with narcotics police.

But the most significant threat to Posse Comitatus may not come from the use of soldiers as cops, but from the increasing tendency of cops to act like soldiers, a troubling trend best seen in the 30-year rise in the use of paramilitary SWAT teams in America. SWAT teams are ubiquitous now, thanks in large part to a number of bad federal incentives, including a Pentagon program that since the late 1980s has given millions of pieces of surplus military gear to local police departments for free or at a steep discount.

In the 1970s, only a handful of police departments had SWAT teams, and they were deployed only a few hundred times per year across the entire country. That number soared to around 4,000 per year by the early 1980s, and to an incredible 50,000 per year by the mid 2000s. There are now 130–150 SWAT raids per day in America. In most, police force their way into private homes, usually at night, then violently secure the premises at gunpoint. They sometimes deploy flash grenades, which are designed to cause sensory paralysis of everyone inside. And the purpose of the vast majority of these raids is to serve search warrants on people suspected of nonviolent, consensual drug crimes. According to my own research, at least 48 innocent people have died in such raids. That is, people who weren’t caught with — or even suspected of having — any illicit drugs. Dozens more nonviolent drug offenders have been killed, as have about 30 police officers.

Politicians have dressed police like soldiers, trained them in paramilitary tactics, given them military weapons and armor, and told them they’re fighting a “war.” And as everyone knows, sometimes in a war, innocent people die.

Foreign policy

Just months before the attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. government gave $43 million to Afghanistan — a way of compensating Afghan farmers hurt by the Taliban’s compliance with a U.S. request to crack down on that country’s opium farms. (As it turns out, the Taliban eradicated only those farms in competition with the Taliban’s own producers.)

Americans don’t seem to have learned. The Western world’s prohibition on opium has made poppies a lucrative crop for impoverished Afghan farmers, and is a valuable recruiting tool for insurgents and remnant Taliban forces. At the same time, DEA agents and U.S. and UN troops rove the Afghan countryside on search-and-destroy missions, setting the livelihoods of Afghan farmers — their poppies — aflame before their very eyes. That is not the way to build alliances. As Misha Glenny, author of a book on the global drug trade, explained in a 2008 article for the Washington Post,

the drug war has become the Taliban’s most effective recruiter in Afghanistan. Afghanistan’s Muslim extremists have reinvigorated themselves by supporting and taxing the countless peasants who are dependent one way or another on the opium trade, their only reliable source of income.... The “War on Drugs” is defeating the “war on terror.”

But it isn’t just in Afghanistan. The United States has a long history of turning a blind eye to human-rights abuses and unintended consequences in the name of eradicating illicit drugs overseas. Between 2001 and 2003, the United States gave more than $12 million to Thailand for drug interdiction efforts. Over 10 months in 2003, the Thai government sent out anti-drug “death squads” to carry out the extra-judicial executions of as many as 4,000 suspected drug offenders. Many were later found to have had nothing to do with the drug trade. Though the U.S. State Department denounced the killings, the United States still continued to give the same Thai regime millions in aid for counternarcotics operations with little control over how that money was spent.

Then there’s the bloody civil war in Mexico, where the U.S.-backed and heavily U.S.-funded drug war has wreaked incomprehensible carnage. An estimated 15,000 people were murdered by drug cartels in 2010 alone. Some 30,000 have been murdered since 2006 when, at the urging of the U.S. government, President Felipe Calderon of Mexico called up the Mexican military to put more war in the country’s drug war. Five years later, the policy has produced enough bodies to populate a small town. And yet the drug trade still flourishes. News reports indicate that astonishing numbers of Mexican police forces, politicians, and customs agents are now on cartel payrolls. Drug lords brazenly murder journalists, pop singers, and sports stars. The border town of Praxedis G. Guerrero recently hired 20-year-old college student Marisol Valles García as its new police chief. The previous chief, like those in nearby towns, had been assassinated. Garcia was the only one to apply for the job.

Meanwhile, U.S. drug agents and politicians have callously dismissed all of this brutal violence in Mexico as collateral damage in the quest for a drug-free America. One former federal drug warrior wrote in an Arizona newspaper in 2008 that all the death and carnage in Mexico is actually good news — Mexicans slaughtering one another is a sign that “we’re” winning. Other U.S. officials have since echoed that horrifying claim. This cynical, ends-justifies-the-means mentality isn’t surprising, but that doesn’t make it any less immoral. If thousands of Mexicans have to die in order to stop Americans from getting high, well, that’s a sacrifice U.S. anti-drug officials are willing to make. How noble of them. In 2009, the U.S. Congress approved another $400 million in drug-war aid to Mexico, despite concern from human-rights organizations that the Mexican military may be killing innocent Mexican citizens in its vigor to crack down on the drug lords.

In South America, the “Plan Colombia” drug interdiction effort spearheaded by Bill Clinton has also been a disaster, as U.S. military aid has funded right-wing paramilitary groups responsible for mass human-rights abuses and spawned public support for the FARC guerrilla organization that periodically rises up to threaten the country’s stability. The other main component of the plan — the mass spraying of concentrated herbicide on Colombian coca fields — has poisoned vast tracts of farmland (and, some say, many people), depriving many Colombians of their livelihood. That, again, isn’t likely to foster warm feelings toward the United States.

U.S. citizens occasionally get picked off in U.S. overseas anti-drug efforts, too. In 2001, the CIA ordered the Peruvian Air Force to shoot down what they thought was a drug plane. They were mistaken. Instead, they had shot down a plane filled with U.S. missionaries. Veronica Bowers, 35, and her seven-month-old daughter Charity died in the ensuing crash. Just more collateral damage.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: banglist; bloodoftyrants; bootlickersonparade; corruption; davesnothereman; deadjackbootswalking; fascism; fraud; govtabuse; jbt; leo; leocorruption; libertarians; liberty; lping; medicalmarijuana; militarizedpolice; moonbat; ntsa; policestate; potheadsonparade; rapeofliberty; ronpaul; stfu; swat; swatabuse; tyranny; waronliberty; wod; wodlist; wosd
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1 posted on 10/30/2011 11:58:34 AM PDT by bamahead
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To: Abathar; Abcdefg; Abram; Abundy; albertp; Alexander Rubin; Allosaurs_r_us; amchugh; ...
In the 1970s, only a handful of police departments had SWAT teams, and they were deployed only a few hundred times per year across the entire country. That number soared to around 4,000 per year by the early 1980s, and to an incredible 50,000 per year by the mid 2000s. There are now 130–150 SWAT raids per day in America.



Libertarian ping! Click here to get added or here to be removed or post a message here!
2 posted on 10/30/2011 12:00:06 PM PDT by bamahead (Few men desire liberty; most men wish only for a just master. -- Sallust)
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To: bamahead
The only reason anyone would be against the War-on-Some-Drugs is because they are a closet-druggy.

</sarcasm>

3 posted on 10/30/2011 12:11:36 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum ("Government does not solve problems; it subsidizes them." --Ronald Reagan)
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To: bamahead
Folks will be along shortly to explain why all of that is a good thing.
4 posted on 10/30/2011 12:12:00 PM PDT by MileHi ( "It's coming down to patriots vs the politicians." - ovrtaxt)
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To: bamahead

It gets gnarlier yet when foreign (e.g. Mexico) narco gangs get involved in the picture.

I don’t recommend people use street drugs even if it’s possible to get them in a more or less legal manner. I believe that physicians should rightfully be involved with the administration of medicines that have serious side effects or which can be habit forming.

At some point, however, one has to wonder whether banning a particular medication outright — the dent that puts in its usage — is worth the unintended consequences in crime and in deadly Keystone Cop operations. Virtually all the crime goes out of the trade of a banned item once it is no longer banned.


5 posted on 10/30/2011 12:13:47 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (ya don't tug on Supermans cape/ya don't spit into the wind...and ya don't speak well of Mitt to Jim!)
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To: bamahead
It takes a hopelessly burnt out drug wasteoid not to be able to look at the entire history of mankind and realize that Governments have a natural pattern of usurping the rights of citizens.

Generally the excuses they use to do before they have the power for tyranny to sustain itself have been legitimate.

But if your mental.faculties are heavily damaged by the drugs you pump into your cranium, your reasoning ability becomes too feeble to comprehend this, even if you still possess good verbal skills.

Sad really.

6 posted on 10/30/2011 12:13:51 PM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: bamahead
See my tagline. That is what will do in the twin pillars of the nanny/welfare state - the war on poverty and the war on drugs.
7 posted on 10/30/2011 12:19:32 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: bamahead

I will admit that having the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service create a SWAT team to raid Gibson guitar manufacturers is a little over the top. Holder is one wild and crazy guy.


8 posted on 10/30/2011 12:24:08 PM PDT by FlingWingFlyer (Stop Government Greed Now!!!!)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

When a child dies of overdose, these people remain silent.

They sure cry tears for drug dealers though.


9 posted on 10/30/2011 12:25:52 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
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To: bamahead
right. drug war is evil, ergo legal sanction of drug use is good.

Prostitution, too, right?

A libertarian is a liberal without a conscience.

10 posted on 10/30/2011 12:27:57 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (...then they came for the guitars, and we kicked their sorry faggot asses into the dust)
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To: the invisib1e hand
So where does the Constitution delegate authority to fedgov to impose national prohibition, in your personal opinion?
11 posted on 10/30/2011 12:32:51 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: bamahead
The 18th Amendment enacted Prohibition in 1920. So there was popular sentiment in the country to end the production and distribution of alcohol. Just 13 years later in 1933 Prohibition was repealed with the 21st Amendment. What is striking is that the people of the United States had the good sense to understand that Prohibition was a horrific mistake. Then they were able to do a quick 180 and rectify their foolish and dare a say stupid mistake.

Fast Forward a few decades. We have had this war on drugs for about 50 years (more or less) and the results have also been horrific. The damage has been noted and is ongoing. But the American Public just doesn't have the good sense today in 2011 as we had in 1933. It's one thing to make a mistake. It's another thing to correct a mistake (and quickly). But to go on with this insane Drug War as we have is essentially madness. Now I know drugs are different from alcohol. But the types of people who destroy themselves with drugs are gonna find another way to do it even if we could keep drugs away from them.

End the madness!
12 posted on 10/30/2011 12:34:10 PM PDT by truthguy (Good intentions are not enough.)
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To: Ken H
So where does the Constitution delegate authority to fedgov to impose national prohibition, in your personal opinion?

Non sequitir.

13 posted on 10/30/2011 12:35:31 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (...then they came for the guitars, and we kicked their sorry faggot asses into the dust)
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To: bamahead
Thanks for posting this devastating article. I wish I could say it might change some minds here, but I suspect not. You'll notice that the keyword vandals have already been here, with more of their kind likely to follow.

The drug war will end only when the nation can no longer afford it, just as the other wars will end when we're bankrupt. Common sense is all too uncommon among the political classes.

14 posted on 10/30/2011 12:37:43 PM PDT by logician2u
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To: the invisib1e hand

A drug warrior is a nazi, except without a conscience.


15 posted on 10/30/2011 12:38:39 PM PDT by coloradan (The US has become a banana republic, except without the bananas - or the republic.)
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To: truthguy

End it? No, they will kick it up a notch or two.

Armed SWAT “surveillance” drones will be the next step.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2799979/posts

Taking big brother to a whole new level.


16 posted on 10/30/2011 12:42:10 PM PDT by KEVLAR
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To: the invisib1e hand
Look what I just found...

Amendment X

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

______________________________________

So where, in your opinion, does the Constitution delegate to fedgov the power to impose national prohibition?

17 posted on 10/30/2011 12:43:58 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: coloradan; the invisib1e hand
A drug warrior is a nazi, except without a conscience.

One who tacitly approves the senseless murder of pastors and missionaries by his jackbooted heroes too I might add.

Not to mention our veterans:

Arizona SWAT Team Defends Shooting Iraq Vet 60 Times
A Tucson, Ariz., SWAT team defends shooting an Iraq War veteran 60 times during a drug raid, although it declines to say whether it found any drugs in the house and has had to retract its claim that the veteran shot first.

The brainless cynicism truly shows only love for authority...not liberty.
18 posted on 10/30/2011 12:46:23 PM PDT by bamahead (Few men desire liberty; most men wish only for a just master. -- Sallust)
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To: GeronL
When a child dies of overdose, these people remain silent.

All indications are that the WOSD has increased the trafficking and abuse of drugs.

19 posted on 10/30/2011 12:47:57 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum ("Government does not solve problems; it subsidizes them." --Ronald Reagan)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
were does it all end though ? you all ready have stuff Salvia divinorum which was the big bugaboo a few years back ,plus what they call bath salts now.they will aways be people looking for a way to get high

legitimize the stuff and just have severe penalties for drug related crimes

20 posted on 10/30/2011 12:51:54 PM PDT by Charlespg
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To: GeronL

An 87 year old Indiana man was arrested with over 200lbs of cocaine here in Michigan last week. He says two armed men forced him to transport it.

There have also been at least two freight containers full of pot seized here over the past couple of weeks along with a whole bunch of immigration holds placed on suspects.

We could seriously swing the momentum in our favor if we were controlling our border.


21 posted on 10/30/2011 12:54:17 PM PDT by cripplecreek (A vote for Amnesty is a vote for a permanent Democrat majority. ..Choose well.)
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To: cripplecreek

That only deals with drugs from outside the US.

The domestic pot crop is estimated by the DEA to be over 10 million pounds a year. (as of 1988)

Obviously the remnants of liberty must be removed to finish the job.


22 posted on 10/30/2011 1:02:06 PM PDT by KEVLAR
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To: the invisib1e hand
A libertarian is a liberal without a conscience.

Your unintelligible intellect shines through so clearly.

On your FR homepage, you claim to love von Mises...yet it's quite clear you've never read one lick of his works...

For if the majority of citizens is, in principle, conceded the right to impose its way of life upon a minority, it is impossible to stop at prohibitions against indulgence in alcohol, morphine, cocaine, and similar poisons. Why should not what is valid for these poisons be valid also for nicotine, caffein, and the like? Why should not the state generally prescribe which foods may be indulged in and which must be avoided because they are injurious?
Ludwig von Mises, Liberalism: The Classical Tradition

So put that in your jack boot licking pipe, and smoke up.
23 posted on 10/30/2011 1:02:18 PM PDT by bamahead (Few men desire liberty; most men wish only for a just master. -- Sallust)
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To: bamahead

The Drug War is just one part of the American Way of Socialism!

But a very important part in terms of rationalizing the militarization of the police forces.

To paraphrase Mao, you’ve created “Communism with American characteristics”.

Congratulations.


24 posted on 10/30/2011 1:03:47 PM PDT by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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To: GeronL
and how many 16/17 year olds die of alcohol poisoning ? strawman argument

I don't see a need for brown shirt/banana republic law enforcement.and destroying the Bill of rights because of 8% of the US population

25 posted on 10/30/2011 1:03:59 PM PDT by Charlespg
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To: KEVLAR

Don’t care what clowns like you think.

You may now rejoin the occupiers because you’re no loss to decent society.


26 posted on 10/30/2011 1:05:43 PM PDT by cripplecreek (A vote for Amnesty is a vote for a permanent Democrat majority. ..Choose well.)
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To: MileHi
Folks will be along shortly to explain why all of that is a good thing.

Yup, I was going to post that this should be an interesting thread....going to get some popcorn now.

27 posted on 10/30/2011 1:08:52 PM PDT by Las Vegas Ron (Rush Limbaugh = the Beethoven of talk radio)
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To: bamahead; The Invisible Hand

“On your FR homepage, you claim to love von Mises...yet it’s quite clear you’ve never read one lick of his works...”

uh...one shay + one shay = ....shay.


28 posted on 10/30/2011 1:08:57 PM PDT by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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To: cripplecreek

Very nice.

You give the right a bad name like incompetent drug warriors do to law enforcement.


29 posted on 10/30/2011 1:13:41 PM PDT by KEVLAR
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To: GeronL
They sure cry tears for drug dealers though.

No one cries tears for drug dealers.

What freedom loving Americans should cry for are the rights that everyday citizens are losing over this "war" on drugs"

So drugs are illegal, do you support the tactics that are used to enforce those laws?

It's the tactics and usurpation's of Constitutional rights that are used that give cause against all of this.

What other laws on the books should be supported by this kind of aggression and usurpation?

30 posted on 10/30/2011 1:14:34 PM PDT by Las Vegas Ron (Rush Limbaugh = the Beethoven of talk radio)
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To: bamahead

Now if they used police power as police and served warrents like they once did, most of the collateral damage would not be happening. Its when police play soldier that people get gunned down in the heat of “battle”.

So the question is, why are the police now acting like the SS, instead of police? Who wants it that way enough to change the old ways that did indeed work for a couple of hundred years?

Is the drug “war” about drugs, or about war? And what is the real target of all this?

Is it public safety? Or the public?


31 posted on 10/30/2011 1:15:36 PM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
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Some Things In Life Are A Surprise


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Freepathons? Not So Much

Become A Monthly Donor

32 posted on 10/30/2011 1:24:03 PM PDT by DJ MacWoW (America! The wolves are here! What will you do?)
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To: American in Israel
Is the drug "war" about drugs, or about war? And what is the real target of all this?

My explanation is pretty mundane. Fedgov doles out tens of billions each year to fight the WOD. Collectively, states do the same.

There are a whole lot of people in government, and to a lesser extent private industry, who benefit from it. And that doesn't take into account corrupt officials being paid by the cartels.

To simplify my answer, I would call it Drug War Whorery.

33 posted on 10/30/2011 1:28:42 PM PDT by Ken H (They are running out of other people's money. )
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To: the invisib1e hand
Actually,a libertarian just wishes to allow the invisible hand of the market to work in all spheres of commerce.

How pompous is it to imagine that the state can control the selling of ones body or to presume that making drugs illegal will make the market disappear.

34 posted on 10/30/2011 1:44:51 PM PDT by Aevery_Freeman (Hey, Hippie...Occupy a LIFE!)
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To: Eric Blair 2084

Nanny state/wosd ping


35 posted on 10/30/2011 3:18:02 PM PDT by Don W (You can forget what you do for a living when your knees are in the breeze.)
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To: GeronL
And when the Bill of Rights is slaughtered right in front of you, you cheer.
36 posted on 10/30/2011 3:24:07 PM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: All

Folks, I have been in police work for over fifteen years now and I can tell you from experience that we are not winning the war on drugs. Nor are there any plans to win it.

As someone mentioned, it keeps many people in government employed, from clerks to cops to judges, and props up supporting industries and professions, such as police equipment manufacturers and law offices.

The WOD has caused more challenges and SCOTUS rulings on the 4th Amendment than any other source. It has also negatively impacted the 2nd Amendment as well.

It might be distasteful to some but we have to seriously consider at least decriminalization and possibly legalization with manufacturer and distribution taken out of the hands of the cartels.

We are not prepared for military action with Mexico to stop the problem and there is no desire for serious prosecution and we simply cannot afford to carry on like we are.

I would rather see narcotics given out free at clinics then to see the Constitution continue to get shredded and people lose all faith in their judicial system.


37 posted on 10/30/2011 3:43:51 PM PDT by Molon Labbie ("It's free, swipe your EBT!")
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To: Molon Labbie

Hmmm, for some reason, “To: All” doesn’t seem to work anymore.


38 posted on 10/30/2011 4:30:10 PM PDT by MetaThought
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To: MetaThought

I apologize if To: All goes to everyone’s ping box. I thought it would just generate in thread count...was not my intent to spam everyone’s ping.


39 posted on 10/30/2011 4:37:38 PM PDT by Molon Labbie ("It's free, swipe your EBT!")
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To: American in Israel

The question is... are you going to vote for those that continue this trend or vote for someone that actually supports the 10th Amendment.

Crying about this, but then voting for the b@st@rds that continue it (or one up it) is the height of folly.


40 posted on 10/30/2011 5:11:47 PM PDT by gogogodzilla (Live free or die!)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
It gets gnarlier yet when foreign (e.g. Mexico) narco gangs get involved in the picture.

Why does that have the oportunity to happen?

41 posted on 10/30/2011 5:16:26 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: MrEdd
That was perfect.

Could not have said it better myself.

42 posted on 10/30/2011 5:24:12 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: Molon Labbie
I know it used to ping everyone, I guess they changed it so it doesn't anymore. So relax, you didn't ping me.
43 posted on 10/30/2011 5:35:07 PM PDT by MetaThought
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To: GeronL
When a child dies of overdose, these people remain silent. They sure cry tears for drug dealers though.

Without the war on some drugs, there would be no ovedoses on the part of children or otherwise.

Interesting how statists always claim that whatever they want to do is "for the children".

44 posted on 10/30/2011 5:38:24 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: the invisib1e hand
right. drug war is evil, ergo legal sanction of drug use is good. Prostitution, too, right?

Correct.

45 posted on 10/30/2011 5:40:30 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: Ken H

Logic always fails in an emotional argument, but you did a great job nonetheless.


46 posted on 10/30/2011 5:46:01 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: Molon Labbie
Permanent employment for unionized government employees with guns, badges and the power of arrest.

I get it.

47 posted on 10/30/2011 5:54:21 PM PDT by elkfersupper (Member of the Original Defiant Class)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

I forgot that you have the nanny state list.


48 posted on 10/30/2011 6:32:20 PM PDT by Don W (You can forget what you do for a living when your knees are in the breeze.)
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To: elkfersupper

Nobody would use drugs without the WOD?

What an imbecile. An insult to the psych ward


49 posted on 10/30/2011 7:47:29 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
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To: Charlespg

So?

Legalize it since we can;t stop it?

Same with murder and rape?

How do you feel about illegal immigration?

/s


50 posted on 10/30/2011 7:48:38 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Happiness)
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