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Fleet of Foot and Blissfully Bold, Freeloaders at the Marathon Wear Fake Bibsóbut Win No Prizes
WSJ ^ | 11-5-11 | KEVIN HELLIKER

Posted on 11/05/2011 8:06:13 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic

In the Running World, They're Called 'Bandits' and Race Officials Don't Like to Discuss Them; the Cockroach Analogy

For anyone without an official slot in Sunday's New York Marathon, here's a thought: Run it anyway. But don't expect the running establishment to cheer you on.

Peter Sagal tried that at last month's Chicago Marathon. Without paying the $145 registration fee, he joined the nearly 38,000 official marathoners on Oct. 9, partaking of free Gatorade along the way.

"I know it's wrong," Mr. Sagal, host of National Public Radio's "Wait Wait… Don't Tell Me!," wrote afterward in a blog for Runner's World magazine. But, he joked, "I waved to the crowd in a charming way, so maybe I earned it."

The response to Mr. Sagal's blog was overwhelmingly negative, with some readers calling him a thief and vowing...see link.

(Excerpt) Read more at online.wsj.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cheating; marathon; newyork; npr; petersagal

1 posted on 11/05/2011 8:06:18 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

perhaps a holographic tattoo or a subdermal rfid chip would solve the problem.


2 posted on 11/05/2011 8:12:19 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Hail to the Thief)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Classic freeloader mentality we are seeing in more sinister form in the “Occupy” movement. It costs money to put on a race. These “bandits” want to mooch off of others who play by the rules and pay for putting on the race. Doesn’t it SO figure that the featured guy is an NPR reporter!


3 posted on 11/05/2011 8:14:41 AM PDT by rockvillem
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To: afraidfortherepublic
There's nothing illegal about jogging down city streets without a race bib,

Then what gives race officials the right to kick them out?

4 posted on 11/05/2011 8:16:17 AM PDT by DManA
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To: afraidfortherepublic

When I was the director for an annual 10k run in Sonoma County I absolutely hated bandits. The proceeds went to a local community non-profit group, and the runners who bypassed registration were the scum of the earth as far as I was concerned....


5 posted on 11/05/2011 8:18:08 AM PDT by freebilly
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To: rockvillem
I'd be more inclined to your point of view except there is only a 1 in 2 chance of getting in by their rules.

About 140,000 runners applied for 62,000 slots.

6 posted on 11/05/2011 8:19:11 AM PDT by DManA
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To: freebilly

I would have no problem with these folks, as long as they don’t accept prizes. EXCEPT, they take up space. There is a limit to participation for a reason. If you’ve ever watched one of these races, it is a sea of runners packed curb to curb. It is not fair if these unpaid bandits get in the way of serious contenders who have paid their fees.


7 posted on 11/05/2011 8:21:44 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

National Public Radio freeloader is redundant.


8 posted on 11/05/2011 8:23:27 AM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: DManA

There are often limits on these races - e.g., I’ve run the Marine Corps Marathon a couple of times and yeah (at least back then), you had to register early or get shut out. Just because you WANT to run a race doesn’t entitle you to run it if its already full. Register sooner or find another race. There are plenty out there.


9 posted on 11/05/2011 8:25:56 AM PDT by rockvillem
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Looking For Donors


Click The Pic

Are You One?

10 posted on 11/05/2011 8:26:40 AM PDT by DJ MacWoW (America! The wolves are here! What will you do?)
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To: rockvillem

If you want something bad enough you find a way to make it happen. That’s what Americans used to do.


11 posted on 11/05/2011 8:28:24 AM PDT by DManA
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To: afraidfortherepublic
as long as they don’t accept prizes

Really, only a handful of people expect to win a prize (except the I make it medal).

12 posted on 11/05/2011 8:29:31 AM PDT by DManA
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To: DManA

“If you want something bad enough you find a way to make it happen. That’s what Americans used to do”

So since I want to run a few laps in the next NASCAR race...I should just drive through the gates and get on the track and no one will stop me...right?


13 posted on 11/05/2011 8:32:18 AM PDT by Crim (Palin / West '12)
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To: Crim

NASCAR isn’t run on public streets.


14 posted on 11/05/2011 8:33:45 AM PDT by DManA
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To: afraidfortherepublic

What to bandits placed first? Has that ever happened?


15 posted on 11/05/2011 8:51:15 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: DManA

Yep. Pretty much not only kills any sympathy I might have had for race organizers... but I will go one further. If they present any legal action against any runner then the judge should assess all court costs on them win or lose.

Don’t like that? Then run on private land someplace or make room for whoever wants to enter.


16 posted on 11/05/2011 8:51:37 AM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: DManA

I meant the ubiquitous T shirts, etc. But, it’s tacky to pretend to be a participant when you are not — like that Rosie somebody who jumped into the Boston (or maybe it was ny) a short way fro the finish and went on to “win” until she was exposed as a fraud.


17 posted on 11/05/2011 8:52:06 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Jack Hydrazine

See # 17. Cant remember her name, or the race, but Rosie Somone jumped into the end of either the Boston, or the NY, Marathon and was declared the Women’s winner briefly, until she was exposed as having waited behind a tree to join the runners late in the race.


18 posted on 11/05/2011 8:55:39 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Rosie was a registered contestant no? I love how she rode the subway in her bib and thought she could get away with it.


19 posted on 11/05/2011 9:01:21 AM PDT by DManA
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To: Jack Hydrazine
This even happened to Frank Shorter in the 1972 Olympics.
By Ken Mcmillan

Times Herald-Record

Published: 2:00 AM - 08/23/08 Last updated: 2:27 AM - 08/23/08

Olympic marathon champion Frank Shorter of Middletown says he never ran for the adoration of the crowds, but just once he would have liked to hear the roar of a stadium audience just for him.

Shorter was involved in one of the most bizarre endings of an Olympic marathon.

It was Sept. 10, 1972, and Shorter had run away from the field of runners on the streets of Munich, West Germany. His lead was so large that television cameras could not capture him and trail runners in the same picture.

There was about 15 minutes left in the 26.2-mile race when Shorter let down his runner's focus and allowed himself to imagine what was ahead.

"The most satisfaction I gave myself,'' he said, "was about three miles from the end when I'd done some mental arithmetic of how far ahead I was and figured out how hard they would have to run to catch me. That's when I had my hit-by-a bus revelation, which means if I don't get run over by a bus I am probably going to win.''

"I allowed myself that enjoyment, the idea of winning, for the moment,'' he added.

The tunnel entrance was within sight when Shorter heard a roar go up from the crowd. It was the final day of the track and field meet, and Shorter figured someone made a high jump or pole vault.

"So I ran down the tunnel and here it is — and it was nothing,'' Shorter said, eliciting laughter from the audience who gathered for a dinner prior to the recent Orange Classic road race.

It turns out a shaggy-haired imposter had sprung from the tunnel and started taking a victory lap, drawing the applause meant for the marathon leader.

The commentary from the BBC was downright precious.

"Now here's some ... This is very puzzling. This man is not on the program. It's a hoax. It's somebody having a lark. I don't think it's a demonstration but he looks as fresh as a buttercup. And of course there is the real leader, it's Frank Shorter of the United States, the Pan American champion, the American champion who was fifth in the 10,000 meters.''

Shorter had no idea, though, and was genuinely puzzled by the reaction as he strode confidently onto the front stretch of Olympic Stadium.

"The thought I honestly had was, 'Geez, I'm an American (in Europe) but give me a break,''' Shorter said. "You're frustrated. Then I started to run around and people started whistling, and whistling in Europe is booing.

"Finally, someone from the stands yelled, 'Don't worry, Frank.' I said to myself, 'Why should I worry? I'm winning.'''

As he came around the final turn, Shorter turned toward the tunnel and saw the commotion with the prankster, who had been directed off the course. After crossing the finish line with the second-fastest Olympic marathon time of 2 hours, 12 minutes, 19.71 seconds, somebody finally clued Shorter in to the imposter.

Believe it or not, Shorter says he's not bothered by what happened on that Sunday morning.

"The great thing about it for me over time has been that I knew then and I still know that I never ran for that roar because it's never bothered me, it's never bothered me,'' said Shorter, now 60. "On the other hand, a lot of people really got angry. People had this empathy for me that maybe I felt I hadn't won.''

It turns out that wasn't the only marathon moment stolen from Shorter. Four years later, in Montreal, Shorter was approaching the tunnel at Olympic Stadium when he heard the huge applause from inside.

Not again, he thought.

"I'm in the exact same place,'' Shorter said, "only this time it's the guy finishing ahead of me. I am thinking to myself, 'I am never going to hear this roar.'''

Shorter finished second in the 1976 Olympic marathon. The winner on that day, and again in 1980 in Moscow, was Waldemar Cierpinski of East Germany. As the years passed, proof of East Germany's illegal doping program for its athletes began to leak out, and files uncovered in 1997 in Leipzig may have identified Cierpinski as one of the test subjects.

Shorter, who used to head up the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, has fought hard to have the gold medal taken away from Cierpinski but to no avail.

"Don Cardon, who finished fourth in that race, likes to tell me that two times in a row I finished second to an imposter,'' said Shorter, who smirks at the cruel joke. "I've always thought that was very interesting.''

Even if Shorter gets his deserved second gold medal, he will still never have those special moments returned to him.

kmcmillan@th-record.com


20 posted on 11/05/2011 9:05:03 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: DManA

“NASCAR isn’t run on public streets.”

That’s your reply?

Well then..how about the Long beach grand prix...

That IS run on public streets...

So once again...now that I have met your qualifier....should I be able to barge my way into a race with my own car..that is run on a public street?


21 posted on 11/05/2011 9:14:41 AM PDT by Crim (Palin / West '12)
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To: Crim

Since the danger involved in your scenario is orders of magnitude greater then for an individual runner joining into the marathon your analogy is inapt.

In addition race car drivers need years of training and experience to be qualified to safely drive a race car. Marathon runners need only to put one foot in front of the other.


22 posted on 11/05/2011 9:21:37 AM PDT by DManA
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To: DManA
From NYT 1996: Boston Braces for a Colossal 100th Marathon
...The 38,500 official runners -- shattering the previous record of 9,269 entrants in 1992 ... and despite meticulously laid plans, the marathon could be as unwieldy as it is unprecedented.

What if the bus system breaks down? What if 20,000 bandits instead of 10,000 crash the gate? What if there is a stampede at the start, where tens of thousands of runners will be funneled past a starting line that is 39 feet wide? ...

The most indelible villain of the Boston Marathon is the impostor Rosie Ruiz, who jumped into the 1980 race in the final mile and crossed the finish line ahead of Jacqueline Gareau of Canada. A computer chip laced to each runner's shoe will serve as a fraud detector this year. The chip will be detected by sensors at the start, midway point and finish. The technology will also allow runners to determine their actual race time, which will be posted on the World Wide Web.

"If we had had this in 1980, there wouldn't have been a Rosie Ruiz," said Phil Graceffa, the marathon's computer consultant.

Still, a thriving black market exists for those who want to buy their way into the race. Runners are selling their bibs because of injury or the desire to make a quick buck. The asking price, as high as $600 two weeks ago, tumbled in recent days, runners said. A bartender who works along the marathon route said he had purchased a bib for $250.

"I didn't want to be behind the bar when everybody else ran by," he said, adding that he had run the marathon the past two years as a bandit.


23 posted on 11/05/2011 9:21:51 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

That is freaking hilarious!!!!
ROFLMAO!!!!!


24 posted on 11/05/2011 9:29:48 AM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: DManA

“Since the danger involved in your scenario is orders of magnitude greater then for an individual runner joining into the marathon your analogy is inapt.

In addition race car drivers need years of training and experience to be qualified to safely drive a race car. Marathon runners need only to put one foot in front of the other.”

LMAO...more qualifiers...

Your first reply was that NASCAR isnt run on public streets....so when faced with races that ARE run on public streets...you add more qualifiers to try and support your stated logic...

You clearly support the race crashers...and will jump through logic hoops and crabwalk to do so...

The bottom line is...the race organizers have every right to restrict who runs that race on public streets...they paid for a permit, they sanction the runners...and they run the event...

Same as the long beach grand prix....

Trying to have it both ways is..illogical...


25 posted on 11/05/2011 9:34:16 AM PDT by Crim (Palin / West '12)
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To: Crim

Well come up with a decent analogy then.

This is an interesting subject, not because I give a rip about marathons, but because it reveals the differences in worlds views between law and order conservatives and libertarian oriented conservatives.


26 posted on 11/05/2011 9:37:14 AM PDT by DManA
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To: DManA
The Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon take place along a public trail named Barr Trail. The number of contestants is limitted to that number that can safely run up/down the narrow trail. Bandits slow down the runners who played by the rules and paid their fee, and make the trail more treacherous.

Taking something you don't deserve or earn just because you want it is not proud, American history, it's theft.

27 posted on 11/05/2011 9:46:03 AM PDT by Washi
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To: MrEdd
I guess you would prefer disorderly out of control chaos as a substitute for an organized athletic event. There's a bunch of you guys in NYC at a park out there, right up your alley. You might like to join them.
28 posted on 11/05/2011 9:54:59 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Nothing but trash.


29 posted on 11/05/2011 10:04:09 AM PDT by Tax-chick (I'm sure your dog likes you.)
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To: hinckley buzzard
False choice.

I would rather they let as many register as want to run.
There is nothing today to prevent that option.

Tags? Print on demand. Even with these numbers.
Porta potties? You have to think of that whether they pay and run, don't pay but run, or stand and watch.

Paperwork? Please. Computers and networked smartphones. There can be an app for everything.

Medical standby? See the second item.

So I stand by my insistence that if you are going to do it on public property make it open to everyone with the entry fee.

If you want me at OWS, that means you are ACORN. I voted against your boss and I already have a job.

30 posted on 11/05/2011 10:41:56 AM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: MrEdd

Bunch them in manageable tranches and send them out every 15 minutes. Send the elites out first. They are already timed automatically when they pass through the start and end lines. There is no reason to start everyone at the same time.


31 posted on 11/05/2011 11:29:30 AM PDT by DManA
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