Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Director Ken Russell dies at 84
BBC News ^ | 28th November 2011 | BBC News

Posted on 11/28/2011 9:05:50 AM PST by the scotsman

'Film director Ken Russell, who was Oscar-nominated for his 1969 film Women In Love, has died at the age of 84.

His son, Alex Verney-Elliott, said he died on Sunday following a series of strokes.

During his career, he became known for his controversial films including Women In Love, which featured Oliver Reed and Alan Bates wrestling nude.

He also directed the infamous religious drama The Devils and The Who's rock opera, Tommy, in 1975.'

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: alteredstates; cinema; film; kenrussell; lisztomania; movies; obituary; savagemessiah; thedevils; themusiclovers; tommy; womeninlove

1 posted on 11/28/2011 9:05:55 AM PST by the scotsman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: the scotsman

“The Devils” was one of the most disturbing movies I ever saw.


2 posted on 11/28/2011 9:15:27 AM PST by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman

“Alex Verney-Elliott”

The name alone says a lot.


3 posted on 11/28/2011 9:33:07 AM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman
"Savage Messiah," "The Devils (of Loudon)," "Women in Love," and "The Lair of the White Worm" are all worth watching, IMO.

RIP, Ken, you were sure one-of-a-kind.

4 posted on 11/28/2011 9:39:42 AM PST by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman
My favorite works of Russell's were a pair of TV movies made for British TV on the Lake poets Wordsworth and Coleridge called Clouds of Glory. The first part - William and Dorothy starred David Warner as Wordsworth and Felicity Kendall as his sister Dorothy. The second - Rime of the Ancient Mariner featured David Hemmings as Coleridge and included lurid hallucinatory sequences. I liked the Wordsworth half the best because it was shot in the lake country and David Warner read Wordsworth's verses beautifully. A pity they are not available on any home video format.
5 posted on 11/28/2011 10:03:58 AM PST by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte

I can assure all interested parties that Ken Russell is still alive.


6 posted on 11/28/2011 10:09:33 AM PST by kruss3 (Kruss3@gmail.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman

Loved Tommy.

Tried to watch as a teenager....thought it was boring.

Again as an adult....loved it, gave me chills.

Rest in peace Ken Russell, and thank you...


7 posted on 11/28/2011 10:10:57 AM PST by LadyBuck (In the immortal words of Jean Paul Sartre, 'Au revoir, gopher')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman
Ann-Margaret & Baked Beans - I never thought they would be in the same sentence....


8 posted on 11/28/2011 10:15:32 AM PST by newfreep (I am a "terrorist". I am Sarah Palin!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte

“David Hemmings as Coleridge”

That would be interesting. I remember Hemming in “The Charge of The Light Brigade” and he had intensity and shocking good looks. But I would like to have seen Richard Burton play the part of Coleridge. Burton, in the 1960s movie “Boom,” read the first few lines of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” and it was magical. His voice was almost cavern-like, like a spirit descending slowly to a subterranean plateau, and accompanied with John Barry’s beautiful music.


9 posted on 11/28/2011 10:47:57 AM PST by Blind Eye Jones
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Blind Eye Jones
Burton, in the 1960s movie “Boom,” read the first few lines of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” and it was magical. His voice was almost cavern-like, like a spirit descending slowly to a subterranean plateau, and accompanied with John Barry’s beautiful music.

Unfortunately, Burton was probably filming something like Boom! and would probably have turned down Clouds of Glory unless it was for money or if Liz could be in it.

Burton was one of the great talents of our time who was unique and whose like will never be seen again. Too bad he got lost in the Taylor/Burton wilderness. There is a very fine audio recording of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner featuring Burton and the recently deceased John Neville.

10 posted on 11/28/2011 11:03:47 AM PST by Sans-Culotte ( Pray for Obama- Psalm 109:8)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte
Burton was one of the great talents of our time who was unique and whose like will never be seen again.

You're right about that. Richard Burton was in many ways a latter-day Renaissance Man. His knowledge of Shakespeare was amazing. It was said he read one book a day, and not any popular pap either, we're talking classic novels and scholarly works. Burton always said that reading books, not acting, was his ticket out of poverty from his childhood in Wales. Then there was the anecdote (urban legend?) about Burton battling Robert Kennedy in a contest quoting from Shakespeare's sonnets. It is said Burton was awarded the "victory" when he was able to recite the 15th Sonnet backwards.

11 posted on 11/28/2011 11:16:23 AM PST by chimera
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Blind Eye Jones
"Burton, in the 1960s movie “Boom,” read the first few lines of Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” and it was magical."

If you want a real treat then, get the soundtrack for "Jeff Wayne's War of the Worlds". Richard Burton did the narration for the musical and it was just outstanding ... it gives me the chills to listen to him and the music. He opens the narration and then, at 4:55, picks up the narration again.

The Eve of the War

12 posted on 11/28/2011 11:21:12 AM PST by BlueLancer (Secede?! Y'all better just be thankful we don't invade ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: chimera; Sans-Culotte

Richard Burton was notorious for showing up to work drunk but nailing whatever part he was playing. He said the only time he didn’t drink before work was when he had to play a drunk as that required more effort.


13 posted on 11/28/2011 11:39:47 AM PST by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Borges
In looking over the list at IMDb, I remember see only The Devils, Savage Messiah, Altered States, Gothic, and his made for TV biography of Delius, Song of Summer.
14 posted on 11/28/2011 2:28:47 PM PST by EveningStar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Well, the man certainly had his share of tragic flaws (obsession with Liz Taylor being one, but I can’t really blame him for that). What is the old saying about a fine line separating genius from madness?


15 posted on 11/28/2011 2:39:34 PM PST by chimera
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: LS

Salome’s Last Dance was pretty twisted!!


16 posted on 11/28/2011 2:45:21 PM PST by djf (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2801220/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte

Richard Burton is my favourite actor.


17 posted on 11/28/2011 3:10:15 PM PST by the scotsman (I)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: chimera

And in Welsh.


18 posted on 11/28/2011 3:10:56 PM PST by the scotsman (I)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: BlueLancer

Thanks for sending me that link. Actually, I’ve used Burton’s narration for a cheesy video I made for the Fringe Festival here in town:

http://www.blindeyejones.com/Video/videos.html

I really like Burton and didn’t know he had read the Rime of The Ancient Mariner with John Neville... but I see it now on Youtube. My favorite Burton movie is Boom even though it got panned by the press. Reviewers have described it as camp but I see it as the normal course of events if you lived the life a poet — perhaps not that different than a Ken Russell film. Poets live extraordinary, over-the-top lives. Playing an existential angel of death and conquering a beautiful heiress in Sardinia is a far cry from what goes on in suburbia. There are a lot of good Burton/Taylor films — some stinkers like Faust — but that one is my favorite.


19 posted on 11/29/2011 12:12:44 AM PST by Blind Eye Jones
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Blind Eye Jones

Great Burton films:

Virginia Woolf
The Spy Who Came In From the Cold
1984
Equus
Anne of the Thousand Days
Becket
Villain
Desert Rats
Look Back in Anger
The Night of the Iguana

Longest Day

Good Burton films:
The Wild Geese
The Medusa Touch
The Tempest
Raid on Rommel
Dr Faustus
Taming of the Shrew
The Robe
Alexander
Prince of Players
Absolution
The Comedians
Massacre in Rome
My Cousin Rachel
The Last Days of Dolwyn
The Klansman
Under Milk Wood
Wagner (tv mini series)


20 posted on 11/29/2011 4:59:16 AM PST by the scotsman (I)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: the scotsman

Good list. A lot I recognize and own and some I’ve never seen, like “The Last Days of Dolwyn.”


21 posted on 11/29/2011 6:43:51 AM PST by Blind Eye Jones
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson