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NASA's Kepler Mission Confirms Its First Planet in Habitable Zone of Sun-like Star
NASA ^ | 12/5/2011 | NASA

Posted on 12/05/2011 10:46:16 AM PST by Dallas59



NASA's Kepler mission has confirmed its first planet in the "habitable zone," the region where liquid water could exist on a planet’s surface. Kepler also has discovered more than 1,000 new planet candidates, nearly doubling its previously known count. Ten of these candidates are near-Earth-size and orbit in the habitable zone of their host star. Candidates require follow-up observations to verify they are actual planets.

The newly confirmed planet, Kepler-22b, is the smallest yet found to orbit in the middle of the habitable zone of a star similar to our sun. The planet is about 2.4 times the radius of Earth. Scientists don't yet know if Kepler-22b has a predominantly rocky, gaseous or liquid composition, but its discovery is a step closer to finding Earth-like planets.


TOPICS: Government
KEYWORDS: exoplanet; kepler; kepler22b; science; xplanets
No Muslims found.
1 posted on 12/05/2011 10:46:27 AM PST by Dallas59
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To: Dallas59

We need interstellar travel NOW, it is needed to escape the Earth while the Liberal, Socialists and Caliphate destroy each other....


2 posted on 12/05/2011 10:51:37 AM PST by GraceG
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To: Dallas59

Only 600 light years away!


3 posted on 12/05/2011 10:51:50 AM PST by Beowulf9
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To: Dallas59

Gravity would be a serious problem.


4 posted on 12/05/2011 10:52:38 AM PST by henkster
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To: henkster

Not really, even a really large planet like that would only have gravity that is 1.5X to 2X the gravity on earth due to how gravity works via the square of distance.

2X gravity is not all that bad, it would be like being overweight when fit and for someone who is fit you would get used to it.


5 posted on 12/05/2011 10:57:35 AM PST by GraceG
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To: Dallas59

We need to send all SEIU employees, Communists, leftists and lawyers to this planet immediately in order to establish a utopian society. The survival of Personkind is at stake!


6 posted on 12/05/2011 10:58:59 AM PST by Darteaus94025
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To: Dallas59
If 0bama wins in 2012 ................
7 posted on 12/05/2011 11:00:10 AM PST by TYVets (Pure-Gas.org ..... ethanol free gasoline by state and city)
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To: Dallas59

They’re looking for planets around stars like ours. It could easily be that most habitable planets orbit red dwarf stars, and orbit them very close in.


8 posted on 12/05/2011 11:04:12 AM PST by varmintman
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To: Dallas59
The planet is about 2.4 times the radius of Earth.

That would make for one long-a*s day!

Come to think of it, that means all the Muslims would starve to death during Ramadan.

9 posted on 12/05/2011 11:05:25 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Dallas59

Even if Proxima Centauri, at 4.27 light years distance, had a habitable planet it wouldn’t really matter since we don’t have the technology to get there in any decent amount of time.


10 posted on 12/05/2011 11:07:34 AM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: Dallas59

I will proudly lead a scouting expedition made up of myself and a able crew of 1000 Swedish bikini models.

I will send for the rest of humanity once we get there and make sure it is safe.....maybe.


11 posted on 12/05/2011 11:08:41 AM PST by VanDeKoik (1 million in stimulus dollars paid for this tagline!)
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To: GraceG

Underwire bras required!


12 posted on 12/05/2011 11:08:59 AM PST by blackdog (The mystery of government is not how Washington works but how to make it stop)
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To: VanDeKoik
I prefer to eat my fruit peeled, thank you!

An obscure kpax reference.

13 posted on 12/05/2011 11:10:59 AM PST by blackdog (The mystery of government is not how Washington works but how to make it stop)
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To: GraceG

Also depends on how dense it is, right?


14 posted on 12/05/2011 11:11:21 AM PST by mkboyce
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To: henkster
Gravity would be a serious problem.

We would all need one of those motorized whatever-you-call-ems that almost ran me over a couple times at Walmart. Anyway, I'll bet most star systems have at least one planet in the habitable zone. The real problem is the right combination of conditions. Water, an atmosphere, a magnetic field, maybe even a large moon. Tidal forces were probably responsible for causing recombinations of amino acids resulting in the first self-replicating protein. There are probably a thousand other factors that make conditions for life such as ourselves extremely rare. Just finding a planet in a star's habitable zone means nothing in itself.
15 posted on 12/05/2011 11:14:34 AM PST by Telepathic Intruder (The right thing is not always the popular thing)
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To: GraceG; henkster

If mass goes as R-cube, gravity goes as R-squared, so surface gravity would be proportional to R, for equal denisity. All other things are rarely, equal, however. The earth is the densiest planet in the solar system, having an iron core. The Moon’s diameter, for instance, is about 3.67 times smaller than earth’s, but it’s surface gravity is about 6.05 times smaller because it is that much less dense.

If this planet has an iron core the size of earth’s and a lot of rock plied on top, it could have surface gravity much lower than earth’s. Either way, just as elephants and spiders exist on earth, complex life could exist on this planet. Even snakes.

Kepler measures light dips from transiting planets, a technique that gives the size, but not the mass of the planet. Doppler studies of its host star should reveal its mass as well.


16 posted on 12/05/2011 11:14:56 AM PST by Lonesome in Massachussets (Ceterum autem censeo, Obama delenda est.)
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To: GraceG; henkster

This is what I was thinking also.

2G’s would not be too bad. 3 G’s would be sucky.


17 posted on 12/05/2011 11:17:20 AM PST by roaddog727 (It's the Constitution, Stupid!)
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To: KevinDavis; annie laurie; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Mmogamer; ...

Thanks Dallas59. Previously these so-called scientists assured everyone that there WERE no planets in the habitable zone of this star -- just shows how they lie and steal my money! Oh, sorry. ;')

That was satire, people. :')

 
X-Planets
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18 posted on 12/05/2011 11:18:59 AM PST by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Buckeye McFrog
That would make for one long-a*s day!

Hmmm. The diameter of Jupiter is more than 22 times earth's and a Jovian day is about 10 hours long. The moon otoh has a diameter 3.66 time smaller than earth's and a solar day of about 29.53 days. The earth was "despun" by the moon over the past several billion years, in fact, even today, the length of day increases by about 0.0015-0.0020 seconds per century.

19 posted on 12/05/2011 11:23:41 AM PST by Lonesome in Massachussets (Ceterum autem censeo, Obama delenda est.)
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To: GraceG

Nevermind...found it:

F = Mm/r^2

(Force of gravity = Mass (planet) x mass (person)/radius squared)

So until NASA figures out the composition of Kepler 22b, i.e. density, then we can’t know how much more a person would weigh.


20 posted on 12/05/2011 11:24:30 AM PST by mkboyce
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets

[ If this planet has an iron core the size of earth’s and a lot of rock plied on top, it could have surface gravity much lower than earth’s ]

That would be awesome, a whole lot more landmass and less gravity to boot!!!! Awesome Holiday planet!

Actually a larger planet may have a higher differentiation during formation, making more of the heavy stuff sink into the core so your scenario is plausible!

2/3 the gravity with 2x the surface area, Let’s call it Earth II and find a way to get there NOW! :)


21 posted on 12/05/2011 11:24:56 AM PST by GraceG
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To: varmintman
There could be potentially habitable planets in any direction from earth, and no doubt they will discover more of them in the future.

Before we spend any money actually getting to one of them, we need to determine if that planet has any chocolate. So far the earth is the only planet known to have chocolate.

22 posted on 12/05/2011 11:35:04 AM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: Buckeye McFrog
The planet is about 2.4 times the radius of Earth.
That would make for one long-a*s day!

Maybe you can explain to me the connection between planetary radius and period of rotation, because I just don't get it.

23 posted on 12/05/2011 11:39:49 AM PST by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: Telepathic Intruder

Plus:

i)plate tectonics (avoids the full globe resurfacing problem seen on Venus and an important part of magnetic field sustainability);

ii) low eccentricity orbit (i.e. mostly round);

iii) a Jupiter mass or larger companion to suck up rocks that would otherwise perpetually bombard the inner solar system;

iv) low variability in solar output; and

v) a quiet neighborhood where nothing big has gone supernova in the last billion years.


24 posted on 12/05/2011 11:42:22 AM PST by hc87
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To: Verginius Rufus

Saw a T-shirt once:

SAVE the EARTH!

It’s the only planet with chocolate!


25 posted on 12/05/2011 11:46:46 AM PST by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: Dallas59

Probably more but the line of sight is off if your just looking for planets that transit the host star.


26 posted on 12/05/2011 11:47:04 AM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: Telepathic Intruder

It’s still Minshara-class.


27 posted on 12/05/2011 11:51:46 AM PST by Lazamataz (That's all.)
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To: Dallas59
Kepler 22B has a nice ring to it.

Everyone that is cool knows that the Starfleet nomenclature for human habitable planets are called class M planets.

28 posted on 12/05/2011 11:58:47 AM PST by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Dallas59
Sad, more discoveries are being made about possible habitable planets and we don't have a viable space program anymore.

Serious actual work on really advanced drives should be going on, not just theoretical work and damn sure no more crap like the ISS.

29 posted on 12/05/2011 11:59:53 AM PST by The Cajun (Palin, Free Republic, Mark Levin, Rush, Hannity......Nuff said.)
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To: varmintman
It could easily be that most habitable planets orbit red dwarf stars, and orbit them very close in.

Most likely with one hemisphere in eternal daylight. I don't buy the usual arguments against such worlds as habitable worlds (flares and atmosphere freeze-out). They probably offer a more stable environment for life than worlds like ours.

30 posted on 12/05/2011 12:08:16 PM PST by Spirochete (Sic transit gloria mundi)
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To: hc87

Those are very good points. However, I have also imagined that there could be planets in which the conditions are even more favorable than here. Less asteroids in the system, for example. Or a star that has been ejected from its host galaxy by a merger. So although an extinction event occurs once every hundred million years or so here, and restarts evolution again almost from scratch, there are others that take much longer. Rare of course by a huge factor, but with more stars in the universe than there are grains of sand on the earth, it’s possible.


31 posted on 12/05/2011 12:14:46 PM PST by Telepathic Intruder (The right thing is not always the popular thing)
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To: Telepathic Intruder

All excellent points.


32 posted on 12/05/2011 12:18:27 PM PST by hc87
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets

I stand corrected. The article does not mention how quickly this planet rotates on it’s axis.


33 posted on 12/05/2011 1:18:41 PM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: The Cajun

[ Serious actual work on really advanced drives should be going on, not just theoretical work and damn sure no more crap like the ISS. ]

Yes need to work on Heim Drives and gravity manipulation type devices.

Anything that can decouple an object from inertia will be a goo thing to research.


34 posted on 12/05/2011 2:44:02 PM PST by GraceG
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To: GraceG
Anything that can decouple an object from inertia

Yep, agree on that.

No matter how fast the drive, if you can't accelerate at a decent speed, you ain't going nowhere fast :^)

35 posted on 12/05/2011 3:10:03 PM PST by The Cajun (Palin, Free Republic, Mark Levin, Rush, Hannity......Nuff said.)
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To: Jack Hydrazine
Even if Proxima Centauri, at 4.27 light years distance, had a habitable planet it wouldn’t really matter since we don’t have the technology to get there in any decent amount of time.

But maybe THEY do to get here. :-)

I have this fantasy that, just as people muddled along without electricity even though it was all around them, we stumble through space at liquid propellent speed until somebody says, "Hey, look what I discovered!"

36 posted on 12/05/2011 3:23:12 PM PST by Oatka (This is the USA, assimilate or evaporate.)
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To: Dallas59
Notice the fine line Jesus built in order to make life possible. I have loved viewing the glory of the God through Hubble, or any of the half dozen, or more satellites and earthbound telescopes, which grant us unbelievable images of this universe. Hallelujah to Christ Jesus, Amen & Amen
37 posted on 12/05/2011 4:06:22 PM PST by Blessed Mother Country
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To: Jack Hydrazine; ELS; ToxicMich; Cronos; Art in Idaho; TheOldLady; Oiao; nepppen; Vaquero; ...



38 posted on 12/05/2011 4:23:34 PM PST by KevinDavis (The History of Christmas: http://www.thehistoryofchristmas.com/)
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To: Oatka

Who is THEY you mention?
Maybe the cloaked ship orbiting Mercury that was revealed by a CME in this video posted on GoogTube?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6X96xI1gLdQ&feature=player_embedded


39 posted on 12/05/2011 4:28:03 PM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: Jack Hydrazine
Who is THEY you mention?

The Roswellians - or those folks mentioned on "Ancient Aliens". :-)

40 posted on 12/05/2011 4:38:11 PM PST by Oatka (This is the USA, assimilate or evaporate.)
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To: Oatka

They could be in that cloaked ship checking out our Messenger satellite that’s in orbit around Mercury!


41 posted on 12/05/2011 4:45:35 PM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: Oatka
The Roswellians - or those folks mentioned on "Ancient Aliens". :-)

SHHH!

They prefer to be called Czechoslovakians...


42 posted on 12/05/2011 5:33:23 PM PST by GreenLanternCorps ("Barack Obama" is Swahili for "Jimmy Carter".)
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To: GraceG
2X gravity is not all that bad, it would be like being overweight when fit and for someone who is fit you would get used to it.

Depends on if your knees are in good shape or not.

43 posted on 12/06/2011 3:32:32 AM PST by hattend (If I wanted you dead, you'd be dead. - Cameron Connor)
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To: Jack Hydrazine

What vantage point was that viewed from?


44 posted on 12/06/2011 4:20:13 AM PST by wastedyears (Not too long you devious little parathyroid. Soon I'll be rid of you and I'll be free.)
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To: wastedyears

I could be the SOHO satellite or STEREO A or B satellites that watch the Sun.


45 posted on 12/06/2011 6:45:24 AM PST by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
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To: The Cajun; All
29 posted on Monday, December 05, 2011 1:59:53 PM by The Cajun: “Sad, more discoveries are being made about possible habitable planets and we don't have a viable space program anymore. Serious actual work on really advanced drives should be going on, not just theoretical work and damn sure no more crap like the ISS.”

Hey, that's not all bad. Why should we white guys mess up the rest of the galaxy with European-style socialism since America seems to be gleefully going down the same path?

After all, it's the Chinese who need more space to put people, anyway, and they seem to be doing a better job of learning capitalist principles than we white guys are in remembering them.

(Sarcasm alert intended... but not entirely tongue-in-cheek, unfortunately.)

46 posted on 01/13/2012 12:02:39 PM PST by darrellmaurina
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