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4 Dead, 49 Missing After (Russian) Arctic Oil Rig Sinks
Moscow Times ^ | 12/18/11 | Khristina Narizhnaya

Posted on 12/18/2011 10:36:24 AM PST by Libloather

4 Dead, 49 Missing After Arctic Oil Rig Sinks
18 December 2011
By Khristina Narizhnaya

At least four people died when the floating Kolskaya oil rig overturned and sank with 67 people on board in the stormy Sea of Okhotsk as it was being towed to shore, 200 kilometers off Sakhalin Island.

Fourteen people survived with minor injuries and 49 were reported missing late Sunday, the Transportation Ministry said. Four survivors were flown to the Nogliki Airport on Sakhalin Island.

The Kolskaya, owned by state-owned offshore drilling company Arktikmorneftegazrazvedka, was being transported to Sakhalin after testing the Pervoocherednaya deep-sea oil well.

The rig's captain sent an SOS signal early Sunday to evacuate people during a storm. But soon after, waves damaged the rig's pipes and knocked out cafeteria windows, inundating the rig with freezing water. It sank in 20 minutes at a depth of more than 1,000 meters, the Transportation Ministry said on its web site.

(Excerpt) Read more at themoscowtimes.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: arctic; energy; offshore; oil; rig; russia
50 dead as oil rig capsizes and sinks in 20ft waves while being towed through storm

At least 50 Russian crew were dead or missing today after an oil rig capsized and sank as it was being towed in a storm.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2075803/50-dead-oil-rig-capsizes-sinks-20ft-waves-towed-storm.html?ITO=1490

1 posted on 12/18/2011 10:36:33 AM PST by Libloather
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To: Libloather

Bush’s fault!!!!!!!!


2 posted on 12/18/2011 10:40:31 AM PST by al baby (Is that old windbag still on the air ?)
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To: Libloather

I’ve never liked the idea much of being on stormy, icy seas.


3 posted on 12/18/2011 10:41:14 AM PST by fso301
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To: al baby

The cold war rages on.


4 posted on 12/18/2011 10:42:28 AM PST by bigheadfred (MERRY CHRISTMAS)
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To: Libloather

The russians are past masters of safety incompetance.


5 posted on 12/18/2011 10:43:10 AM PST by smaug6 (We can't afford to be innocent!! Stand up and face the enemy.)
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To: Libloather

If they are missing, they are dead. The water is so cold they’d live for only minutes.


6 posted on 12/18/2011 10:52:03 AM PST by Lazamataz (That's all.)
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To: Libloather

Little bammy will “take over” and “manage the disaster” in a few weeks or whenever he gets back from the vacation and “band the Russians from drilling” for their safety and to prevent “eco-armengeddon” while demanding to know “who’s butt to kick” blah, blah, blah...


7 posted on 12/18/2011 10:54:12 AM PST by TLI ( ITINERIS IMPENDEO VALHALLA)
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To: Libloather
This song goes out to the victims of the oil rig disaster as well as to crew of the Sparta, a Russian fishing boat that has just foundered off Antarctica.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1QREAaIXJjs,/a>

8 posted on 12/18/2011 10:58:32 AM PST by Fiji Hill
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To: Lazamataz

9 posted on 12/18/2011 10:59:56 AM PST by al baby (Is that old windbag still on the air ?)
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To: fso301
.


The bittersweet aspect is that most died of hypothermia within minutes ...


I worked in the North Sea oil fields ... 1974 ... Taylor Diving and Salvahe (the best !) on Brown and Root Barge-316 over by the Shetland Islands ...

Cold-water survival (in the event of being overboard) was commonly known as a myth ...


May these Russian seafarers rest in God's peace ...


.
10 posted on 12/18/2011 11:14:23 AM PST by Patton@Bastogne
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To: Libloather

If that’s a picture of the rig, no wonder it capsized! That’s so top heavy, it would be dangerous in a one foot sea.


11 posted on 12/18/2011 11:23:55 AM PST by Noob1999 (Loose Lips, Sink Ships)
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To: Libloather
...owned by state-owned offshore drilling company Arktikmorneftegazrazvedka...

I wouldn't want to be the the one having to read this on the air.

12 posted on 12/18/2011 11:30:54 AM PST by Ranald S. MacKenzie (It's the philosophy, stupid.)
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To: Noob1999

That was my reaction too. Something about center of gravity...


13 posted on 12/18/2011 11:31:19 AM PST by MV=PY (The Magic Question: Who's paying for it?)
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To: Patton@Bastogne
The bittersweet aspect is that most died of hypothermia within minutes ...

Yes. Hopefully that's how it ended for them. I hope none were ground up in icy slush.

Cold-water survival (in the event of being overboard) was commonly known as a myth ...

I can understand that. At least they were brightly colored enabling the body to be spotted easier. I always get a cold chill when watching documentary footage of WWII convoys making the Murmansk run.

14 posted on 12/18/2011 11:34:29 AM PST by fso301
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To: Libloather

And the crude is.....?


15 posted on 12/18/2011 11:43:54 AM PST by wolfcreek (Perry to Obama: Adios, MOFO!)
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To: Libloather

Russia’s failed Mars probe will come crashing down to Earth next month, space agency says
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2821480/posts


16 posted on 12/18/2011 11:48:19 AM PST by familyop ("Wanna cigarette? You're never too young to start." --Deacon, "Waterworld")
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To: wolfcreek

It doesn’t specifically say, but if they were towing the rig, the well was probably capped already.


17 posted on 12/18/2011 11:48:28 AM PST by MikefromOhio
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To: MikefromOhio

Didn’t see the *towing* part.

Good that it’s probably capped.


18 posted on 12/18/2011 11:50:28 AM PST by wolfcreek (Perry to Obama: Adios, MOFO!)
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To: al baby
This post and the one a couple of days ago about the uncontrolled oil spills on land show how well socialist societies handle the oil patch. Is Greenpeace in Moscow yet to demonstrate?
19 posted on 12/18/2011 11:53:03 AM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah, so shall it be again.")
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To: Fiji Hill

Nice. Thanks. May they R.I.P.

My husband “started” severaal rigs in the North Sea in the early ‘70s. He holds the patent for a device that allowed them to drill in high seas and brought in the first well. I was at home with the 4 kids and had no idea how dangerous this work was until I saw a documentary about the “storm of the century” about 20 years later. He was up the riser securing sensors to the drill during gale force winds. This was not to bring in oil, but to “prove” his invention for sales purposes.

Then there was the danger inherent in landing and taking off the rig in helicopters, or transfer boats.

It’s lucky that I did not know.


20 posted on 12/18/2011 12:02:37 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Libloather
What kind of nonsense is this? FTA:

The weekend accident is an alarming development, foreshadowing more accidents in the Arctic, Dolgov said. In the Arctic, the environment is much harsher, with storms that last months, huge ice masses and much longer distances for rescues.

Really? if I stub my toe on a rock in my garden, does that mean that other people in m neighborhood will also stub their toes? what a silly statement.

BTW, my husband looked at the picture of the Jack Up rig with this thread and stated that a Jack Up should never be moved in a storm. But, is that really the rig? I read the story at the Moscow Times, and there was no picture with it.

21 posted on 12/18/2011 12:11:11 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Libloather

Dreadful. RIP.


22 posted on 12/18/2011 1:11:13 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (If Newt Gingrich is a Reliable Conservative, Joe Biden is a member of MENSA)
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To: Noob1999; MV=PY
That was a picture of the jack up rig being moved on a carrier ship.

When first lowered off the tranport ship, the base will set in the water like this.

Once put in place, the legs lower down, set on the ocean floor, and the rig base is jacked up above the water, as shown on the right in this picture.

These rigs move rather slowly. When being moved to another area, a transport ship, comes underneath it, then lifts it out of the water to be moved to another area.

The Kolskaya is only rated to operate in water up to 328 feet deep.

http://rigzone.com/data/rig_detail.asp?rig_id=521

23 posted on 12/18/2011 1:16:58 PM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Libloather

Is it necessary to have that many people on a rig that’s being towed? Were they too lazy to transfer them to the towing ship?


24 posted on 12/18/2011 2:41:34 PM PST by Moltke (Always retaliate first.)
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To: fella

I’ll get them started out that way immediately!


25 posted on 12/18/2011 3:10:02 PM PST by RitchieAprile
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To: Patton@Bastogne

You would be interested in a book just published on the loss of the diving bell on the “Wildrake” in 1979.

“Into the Lion’s Mouth” by Michael Smart.

That was a tragic North Sea accident that unnecessarily took the lives of two divers due to gross incompetence of the diving company owner.

In my opinion, it would never have happened on a Taylor Diving job.


26 posted on 12/18/2011 3:13:18 PM PST by Captain7seas (FIRE JANE LUBCHENCO FROM NOAA)
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To: Captain7seas
.


Thanks for the book recommendation ...


We almost lost a diving bell on the 316 ... in about 350 feet of water ...

We were bringing it back-up to the surface (i.e. Saturation Diving Complex on deck) when the primary cable winch malfunctioned ...


The diving bell (with two divers inside) plummeted to the bottom ... taking along with it the (already partially stowed life-support and communications "umbilical cable" (an assortment of about a dozen helium-oxygen gas lines, hot water supply and return, communications, electrical power, etc)


Robert "Bob" Williamson and I were up in the "Sat House" stowing the umbilical cable as the diving bell was being hoisted to the surface ...


Suddenly, the lifting winch failed ... and all diving support hands were in a shocked an simple amazement ...


Suddenly ... Pat Fussell (a Texan Lead Diving Tender) ran back to the Sat House, where Bob Williamson and I were completed suprised by the events ...


Pat Fussell yelled down to us ... "SLACK THE UMBILICAL !!" and Bob and I kwen immediately what the risk was ... that the (partially) stowed-away umbilical cable would possibly ripp itself from the Sat House's steel walls, possibly sever (with 3,000 psi helium-oxygen diving gas and high-voltage power) whip-lashing the entire deck crew on it way down to the bottom of the North Sea ...


I've always seen Pat Fussell's "command presence" to have saved the day ... not only for the two divers ... but also saved many of us from death or crippling injury had the diving umbilical cable assembly broken loose on the deck ... with the closet hospital 4-6 hours away on the Scottish coast ...


Bob Williamson and I miraculously somehow unstowed the entire umbilical cable assembly from the steel wall rack, foot by heavy foot ... while Pat Fussell and the other deck crew watched it speed across the deck, over the stern diving station ...


The diving bell hit bottom ... and again ... miraculously the two divers were not injured ... most probably because the diving bell's entrance hatch had been sealed shut before the original ascent had started ...


Then began a three-hour back-breaking re-ascent to the surface ... with all twelve or so of the Taylor Diving deck crew (diving tenders as they were titled) ... hauling-up the diving bell and umbilical ...


What a day ...


I've never written of this event, even after 37 years ...


The Taylor Diving Superindent that day was Harold "Smitty" Smith, now passed on ...

If Pat Fussell or Bob Williamson ever read this post, please get in touch with me ....



"Charlie's Son" ...



.
27 posted on 12/18/2011 5:17:45 PM PST by Patton@Bastogne
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To: afraidfortherepublic
Pic from the Daily Mail -

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2075803/50-dead-oil-rig-capsizes-sinks-20ft-waves-towed-storm.html?ITO=1490

28 posted on 12/18/2011 7:33:34 PM PST by Libloather (The epitome of civility.)
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To: thackney

Thanks!

But the article stated that this was a “floating platform” Ain’t no way that four 150 foot feet “open structures” can become a stable platform in deep and difficult seas!

My concern is that our EPA, others, will decree that artic drilling is off limits because of the inherent risks.

Risks, like these Russian A-Holes chose to ignore!

Cheers,
Roger Spence


29 posted on 12/18/2011 7:49:02 PM PST by Noob1999 (Loose Lips, Sink Ships)
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To: Noob1999
But the article stated that this was a “floating platform” Ain’t no way that four 150 foot feet “open structures” can become a stable platform in deep and difficult seas!

During the towing operation to relocate, the legs are jacked up and the platform floats. That is when this storm hit and the rig sank.

During operations, drilling, work-over, etc, the legs are down, the platform jacked up and the feet solid on the ocean floor.

30 posted on 12/19/2011 5:33:45 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney; Noob1999

Offshore oil & gas work can be extremely dangerous - and not just for Russian crews.


31 posted on 12/19/2011 4:52:57 PM PST by Ocean Ranger ('unrestricted ocean operations')
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