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To: afraidfortherepublic

Huh? No, that’s not at all what I’m saying. When two people have a baby, the child has but half of the chromosomes of each parent (except in cases of Down’s Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, and some others). A parent with only one child will never pass on any more than half, and if a parent has no siblings, and had no aunts or uncles, a great deal of the genetic info just winds up vanishing.

As we have 23 chromosome pairs, we can’t pass down a quarter of each of our grandparents’ — the closest we can get is 11 of one, and 12 of the other, but that’s not necessarily going to happen. Having three children makes it very likely that both sides of each chromosome pair of each parent has made it to the next generation.


36 posted on 01/02/2012 5:28:50 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Oh pooh! I can’t figure this out unless I use legos!


37 posted on 01/02/2012 6:27:48 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: SunkenCiv

Oh pooh! I can’t figure this out unless I use legos!


38 posted on 01/02/2012 6:27:52 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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