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Vale's megaship sails to China and into the record books
The Telegraph ^ | 1/8/2012 | Emma Rowley

Posted on 01/08/2012 9:23:20 PM PST by bruinbirdman

Longer than the Eiffel Tower, wide as a football pitch and with the capacity for more than 11,000 trucks, the first of a record-breaking fleet of giant ships has completed its maiden voyage to China.

Onboard the Berge Everest was around 350,000 tonnes of iron ore, according to industry sources, enough to make the steel for more than three Golden Gate bridges. After unloading its cargo at the port of Dalian, the vessel has started its journey home to Brazil, it emerged last week.

The ship's arrival was momentous, because of both its scale and the scale of the gamble by Vale, the world's biggest iron ore producer, and the wider shipping industry. Brazilian miner Vale is bringing about a sea change in the shipping industry with its $8bn (£5bn) roll-out of an unprecedented fleet of 35 massive iron ore carriers, including the Berge Everest.

Classed as very large ore carriers (VLOCs), the biggest of the "Valemax" fleet boasts a 400,000 dead weight tonnage (dwt) – the amount a ship can safely carry – which far exceeds the 364,000dwt of the previous record holder.

Vale's new fleet underscores a much wider trend to boost the capacity of carriers of dry bulk commodities such as iron and coal.

Capesize ships – megaships so-called because they were too big to travel through the Panama or Suez Canals so went via Cape Horn or the Cape of Good Hope – have crept up from around 120,000dwt in the early 1980s to closer to the 180,000dwt mark in the past decade.

The logic is simple: economies of scale. The trend has helped to keep shipping costs at astoundingly low levels for the loads involved. Now, with Vale, we are seeing a jump in the movement to supersize, albeit with some

(Excerpt) Read more at telegraph.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: brazil; capesizeships; china; megaships; trade; valemax; vloc; vlocs

1 posted on 01/08/2012 9:23:24 PM PST by bruinbirdman
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To: bruinbirdman

Why didn’t they just drop the stuff off at Newark, NJ and then by train to Pittsburgh? Oh, that’s right, we don’t do that sort of thing anymore/SARCASM


2 posted on 01/08/2012 9:29:20 PM PST by Frank_2001
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To: bruinbirdman

Large ships amaze and awe me, but think of the loss of product if one sinks.


3 posted on 01/08/2012 9:47:17 PM PST by Amberdawn
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To: bruinbirdman

Any idea of how long it takes to load this ship?

I know nothing about ships or shipping but if the load time becomes a significant part of the overall transit time, you may be better off with two smaller ships.


4 posted on 01/08/2012 9:55:37 PM PST by super7man
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To: bruinbirdman

Can it still be hijacked by a gaggle of Somali pirates in the usual manner or will they need a trampoline to get on board?


5 posted on 01/08/2012 10:03:33 PM PST by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge)
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To: piasa

Silly me... these buggers will never get near Somali territory. The Somalis would have to migrate to one of the Capes. :-)


6 posted on 01/08/2012 10:08:00 PM PST by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge)
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To: bruinbirdman

Fill 3 of them up with iron ore, half-way through the Suez Canal, sink them. Maybe that’s what the Chinese built them for?


7 posted on 01/08/2012 10:14:23 PM PST by Dogbert41
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To: piasa
..a trampoline to get on board?

oh geez, that is funny...lol!

8 posted on 01/08/2012 10:23:00 PM PST by SGCOS
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To: Dogbert41

Don’t need to have more than one - they can’t fit into the locks drive up to either side of the canal sink one and the whole shibang is closed for a good long time especially if the think is scuttled with a full load of dirt scrap or ore.


9 posted on 01/08/2012 10:34:15 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: super7man

I’m guessing they load at multiple stations at the same time given the size - on the carrier we loaded the stations on a side plus two topside but had a hefty crew for this I’m assuming multiple cranes or conveyors likely from both sides with barges & cranes on the seaward side and conveyors and cranes landward.

My question is how many ports are there that can accept her to load as you wouldn’t want to load her in a deep anchorage because then it would be barge and crane only and take forever.


10 posted on 01/08/2012 10:39:39 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: bruinbirdman

China opposes the construction of these ships by Vale. Vale will ultimately build 38 Valemax ships for $8 billion. They reduce China’s negotiating leverage in purchasing Brazilian iron ore. China’s favors its own shipping industry, which has smaller tonnages and is therefore less efficient and more costly per tonne. Brazil must reduce transportation costs, however, since Australia has a big distance, and therefore cost, advantage. This is against a backdrop of declining charter rates since the financial crisis. This is a gutsy plan for Vale.


11 posted on 01/08/2012 10:53:50 PM PST by Praxeologue
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To: bruinbirdman

I hate writers.

This ship is perhaps the biggest “bulk carrier”. There are larger container ships, and there have been oil tankers that dwarf this ship.


12 posted on 01/08/2012 11:00:54 PM PST by Born to Conserve
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To: bruinbirdman

Super Size Me!


13 posted on 01/08/2012 11:03:39 PM PST by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> - - -)
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To: smokingfrog
I wanna see a pic of the engine....

The world’s biggest engine is the Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C. It is a turbo charged two stroke diesel engine, and it is the most powerful and efficient low revolution engine in the world today. The Wartsila-Sulser is manufactured by the Aioi Works in Japan and is part of Japan’s Diesel United Ltd engine manufacturers. It is 89 feet long, 44 feet wide, and weighs 2000 tons.

These engines are built in 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14 cylinder configurations. All the engines are straight or 'inline'. The diameter of each cylinder is 3 foot 2 inches with a stroke of 8 foot 2 inches. The 12 cylinder version weighs in at 2000 metric tons and delivers 90,000 horsepower at 100 revolutions per minute, with best fuel economy at 53,244 hp at 90 rpm. When I mention economy, the 14 cylinder engine for example with a displacement of 25,480 Liters ( 1.56 million cubic inches ) burns up 1,660 gallons of crude ("bunker") oil every hour.

14 posted on 01/08/2012 11:18:10 PM PST by spokeshave (Ron Paul finally lit a match after dousing himself with gasoline)
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To: spokeshave
Wärtsilä-Sulzer RTA96-C
15 posted on 01/08/2012 11:37:59 PM PST by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> - - -)
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To: spokeshave
100,000 HP engine info and pics here:

http://www.boattest.com/resources/view_news.aspx?newsid=3055

16 posted on 01/08/2012 11:38:45 PM PST by spokeshave (Ron Paul finally lit a match after dousing himself with gasoline)
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To: bruinbirdman

That’sa big ship. To put it’s size in perspective, it is 8 times the tonnage of teh USS Missouri or RMS Titanic, and more than 4 times that of a supercarrier.


17 posted on 01/08/2012 11:42:30 PM PST by rmlew ("Mosques are our barracks, minarets our bayonets, domes our helmets, the believers our soldiers.")
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To: piasa

They don’t have to worry about Somali pirates. MILF and other Islamist pirates of Indonesia are another matter.


18 posted on 01/08/2012 11:43:48 PM PST by rmlew ("Mosques are our barracks, minarets our bayonets, domes our helmets, the believers our soldiers.")
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To: smokingfrog
That's pretty cool. An engine so big it has ladders inside the crankcase. Whew!

I wonder if its 300 ton crankshaft was made in one casting like an automobile crankshaft? And the lathe that ground its journals must be something too.

19 posted on 01/09/2012 12:08:34 AM PST by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Dogbert41

You are funny, trying to get this thing through there would be like putting a football in a coke bottle.


20 posted on 01/09/2012 12:09:27 AM PST by org.whodat (What is the difference in Newt's, Perry's and Willard's positions on Amnesty.)
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To: spokeshave
N6 oil burners are just about done for, based on what I've read about emission requirements. The likely replacement fuel will likely be LNG at about half the BTUs per gallon.
21 posted on 01/09/2012 4:51:13 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks (Gimme that old time fossil fuel.)
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To: bruinbirdman

Hmm. There is a capsize in Capesize.


22 posted on 01/09/2012 4:54:27 AM PST by Molon Labbie (End the War On Drugs, Restore the Constitution.)
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To: TigersEye
Yes, they have doors into the crankcase area, and fire suppression systems inside the crankcase. At 100 RPM one can go in the crankcase while it is running. The engine heads and cylinders are individually replaceable.... ie one does not need to pull the entire engine.
The pictures of these engines are great, they the leave one little ant looking human in the picture.
23 posted on 01/09/2012 5:01:02 AM PST by Quick Shot
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To: Frank_2001
Why didn’t they just ...

Because--last time I checked--neither of those places are actually in China, the destination for that load.

24 posted on 01/09/2012 5:17:56 AM PST by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: Dogbert41

The Brazilians built them to ship their iron ore to China. The Chicaps dis not build them

The reason was they needed to lower the cost of delivery to compete with Australian miners.

Un mentioned was what will happen when the Ausies get bigger ships?


25 posted on 01/09/2012 5:28:01 AM PST by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 ..... Crucifixion is coming)
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To: bruinbirdman

How much would it take to convert into an aircraft carrier?


26 posted on 01/09/2012 6:16:33 AM PST by bvw
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To: bruinbirdman
Looks almost big enough to carry Michael Moore's lunch.
27 posted on 01/09/2012 7:00:41 AM PST by Moltke (Always retaliate first.)
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To: Quick Shot

It’s really an amazing thing. They could do an entire hour of a “how it’s done” kind of show on that and I would watch it. From how it’s manufactured to how it is installed and the operation and maintenance of it.


28 posted on 01/09/2012 2:53:24 PM PST by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Born to Conserve
This ship is perhaps the biggest “bulk carrier”. There are larger container ships, and there have been oil tankers that dwarf this ship.

I wouldn't say "dwarf". At 400,000 tons (the biggest of the Valemax fleet), would be quite a large ship. But, yes, the biggest oil tankers are larger.

Also, keep in mind, the ships are typically measured in dead weight tons. Meaning, with it fully loaded, which the 400,000 tons is the measurement of it loaded. And historically, some oil tankers have approached 600,000 dead weight tons when fully loaded.

However, the largest of the ships in the Valemax fleet at 400,000 dwt, is about (or will be) 200,000 tons. And the largest oil tankers, when empty, aren't significantly heavier, maybe 270,000 tons. At least not to a point where one would say it would dwarf the largest Valemax ships. The one described in this article is about 350,000 dwt.

29 posted on 01/09/2012 9:01:34 PM PST by ponder life
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To: ShadowAce

Right-o! Once upon a time though, WE made the steel, and China made.....rice and tea;)


30 posted on 01/09/2012 9:34:54 PM PST by Frank_2001
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