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This Map Shows Where All The Trees Are In The US
TBI ^ | 1-`12-2012 | Dina Spector

Posted on 01/12/2012 5:21:20 PM PST by blam

This Map Shows Where All The Trees Are In The US

Dina Spector
Jan. 12, 2012, 2:48 PM

NASA's Earth Observatory just released a map illustrating where all the trees are in America.

The map was created over six years by Josef Kellndorfer and Wayne Walker of the Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) in collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Geological Survey.

The dark swaths of green represent parts of the country with the greatest concentration of biomass.

You can see dense tree cover in the Pacific Northwest as well New England, which has been reforested after intensive logging in the 18th and 19th centuries.


(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: forests; trees; usforestservice
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I've read (a few years ago)that there are more trees alive in the US today than there was when the Europeans first landed.
1 posted on 01/12/2012 5:21:26 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

Very interesting. I’m fortunate to live in one of the darker ‘green’ areas. I love my trees and mountains!

Would love to see what that map would have looked like 300 years ago.


2 posted on 01/12/2012 5:26:18 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: blam

I think half of them are in my backyard...

Serious! I got a couple 130 foot Doug firs back there and some pretty good sized cedars.


3 posted on 01/12/2012 5:27:37 PM PST by djf (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2801220/posts)
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To: blam

And I live riiight there!


4 posted on 01/12/2012 5:28:46 PM PST by Grunthor (I am a conservative, neither half of the one party represents my views.)
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To: blam

And that’s just trees. Lots of other densely vegetated environments that aren’t shown there.


5 posted on 01/12/2012 5:29:51 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: blam

I’ve heard that, too.

This map is very interesting, in terms of where they are (such as punctuating ferquently the great empty spaces of Nevada and Utah) and where they aren’t (such as a the inland “MIssissippi Delta” and a strange slash from Virginia (the Shenendoah Valley?) across Pennsylvania, and up the Eastern edge of New York).


6 posted on 01/12/2012 5:30:46 PM PST by dangus
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To: djf

I got about 60 Doug Firs and some Hemlock. Average about 80 ft.


7 posted on 01/12/2012 5:31:11 PM PST by Grunthor (I am a conservative, neither half of the one party represents my views.)
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To: blam

I cannot believe all those people in the middle of the country cut all their trees down!! Simply unbelievable they would cut them down for firewood or too build wood houses! What were they thinking. Now it is just flat, grass covered plains. Oh, wait, that is the way God made it. My bad.


8 posted on 01/12/2012 5:32:01 PM PST by RetiredArmy (The End of Days draws near. In this time, you should be drawing closer to the Lord Jesus Christ.)
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To: djf

I got about 60 Doug Firs and some Hemlock. Average about 80 ft.


9 posted on 01/12/2012 5:32:39 PM PST by Grunthor (I am a conservative, neither half of the one party represents my views.)
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To: blam

I think the lack of green on this map is supposed to make us into tree huggers.


10 posted on 01/12/2012 5:32:39 PM PST by Rebelbase
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To: blam
I once saw a couple of pictures in a book showing some of the oldest photographs in Colorado from a geological survey in the 1800s, side by side with contemporary photographs taken from the same location. The contemporary photos always had more trees in them.

I was curious and for a couple of summers did the same thing, I checked out old photos in the library, copied them, found the same location, and almost invariably there were far more trees today.

There are several reasons for this. The railroads were a great cause of deforestation, and there were alarmist proclimations around 1900 that we were running out of trees. This led to railroads finding substitues, and eventually the automobile and diesel rail engines halted the railroad's over use.

Also, we stopped using wood for cooking and heat, and got connected to the electrical grid. And finally, we have allowed some lands that were in agriculture to go back to forests.

11 posted on 01/12/2012 5:33:29 PM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: blam

I live in Texas green biomass. Recently had 10 inches of rain - glory!


12 posted on 01/12/2012 5:34:28 PM PST by Marcella (Newt will smash Hussein in debates. Newt needs money.)
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To: blam

Large map.

http://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/76000/76697/whrc_carbon_us_lrg.jpg


13 posted on 01/12/2012 5:35:02 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: blam

It’d be interesting to see the state lines overlaid on this map. We drove east on Interstate 70 from Denver through the Midwest and there wasn’t a tree around until just before Topeka Kansas, and suddenly, everything turned green. It was really amazing. Makes me think that the lower center green line is probably where that is.


14 posted on 01/12/2012 5:35:31 PM PST by PapaNew
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To: blam

Very interesting map.

It was interesting to me...my wife and I went to San Diego for a week a couple of years ago, neither one of us had ever been there, and we loved the climate, very comfortable, not too hot (late spring) but apparently there had been a drought for a while, and everything was brown, brown, brown.

We took a red-eye home, landing back in Boston around 6 am, and had a taxi take us the thirty miles home to the west.

The contrast was stunning to me. As we drove down this rural New England road on a sunny Sunday morning, the sun was streaming through the lush green trees in crepuscular rays, with just a hint of mist rising through them. We saw a deer on the side of the road...

We just take it all for granted, like people who live near the ocean and simply stop seeing it and hearing it. But after a week in a very arid Southern California, it was breathtaking to come home.

The politics up here are absolute crap, but it sure can be beautiful country.


15 posted on 01/12/2012 5:35:39 PM PST by rlmorel ("A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Winston Churchill)
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To: blam

I once read that large areas of Alabama were open plains when the White man first arrived. This was not natural but due to Indians keeping it cleared for agriculture.


16 posted on 01/12/2012 5:36:25 PM PST by yarddog
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To: blam

And I read on here a while ago that due to the logging prevention folks, our forests were now so continous along the northern part of the US that the barred owls are now taking over the areas formerly inhabited by the poor little spotted owl. In some cases, maybe even EATING them.
It ain’t nice to mess with nature..But can be funny sometimes.


17 posted on 01/12/2012 5:39:10 PM PST by bog trotter
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To: Vince Ferrer

Michigan has been logged over about 3 times but you wouldn’t know it today.


18 posted on 01/12/2012 5:39:11 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: blam

I would not doubt it

My homestate...much like where you reside is covered in them

cept the Delta..but even it has some dense forests and forested swamps


19 posted on 01/12/2012 5:39:27 PM PST by wardaddy (I fear we cannot beat Roger Ailes and beltway GOP)
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To: Grunthor

Everything around here is second or even third growth, but there is a nearby lake that has a couple true monsters next to it. You have to take a boat or a raft to get back to where they are.
Not that tall, maybe 120 feet or so, but a good six feet at the base.

They’re at the bottom of a hill that runs up from the lake and I think the guys who originally logged thought to hell with them, that’s WAY too much work!


20 posted on 01/12/2012 5:39:51 PM PST by djf (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2801220/posts)
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To: Vince Ferrer
'And finally, we have allowed some lands that were in agriculture to go back to forests. '

Basically, Uncle Sam bought land and/or took it and planted trees, ie FDR.

1900's etc. private enterprise did a poor job of 'preservation' and we have learned from such mistakes.

Also, various disease[Chestnut blight] wiped out many of our old growth, and other faster growing trees took their place.

21 posted on 01/12/2012 5:39:56 PM PST by Theoria
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To: blam

I live in the middle of a Pecan orchard, none this year due to the drought (texas), so many trees here, I guess thats why Ferdinand Lindheimer (Texas botanist) moved here when Comanches were still roaming these parts. When I feel old I walk around the corner and theres a 175 year old Live Oak (I think it’s a live Oak), second oldest in Texas, Oldest being in El Paso and theres always the 5 foot thick cypress on the Guadalupe/Comal River. Welcome to the Texas Hill Country.

Though it’s gonna be in the 20’s tonight the locally supplied anti-freeze (Dripping Springs Vodka) is excellent.


22 posted on 01/12/2012 5:41:53 PM PST by corbe (mystified)
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To: blam

Maine wins!!


23 posted on 01/12/2012 5:42:53 PM PST by plymaniac (2012=1980)
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To: djf

30 miles north/northeast of me;

http://rainforestgetaways.com/html/valley_of_rainforest_giants.html


24 posted on 01/12/2012 5:44:03 PM PST by Grunthor (I am a conservative, neither half of the one party represents my views.)
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To: wardaddy
"My homestate...much like where you reside is covered in them"

Yup...73% forested and that is increasing by 1 million acres yearly.

The number one export is timber products...and, that equals a GDP the same as Iran with five times less people.

25 posted on 01/12/2012 5:45:13 PM PST by blam
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To: rlmorel
We saw a deer on the side of the road...

I took this photo of one wandering through town here today.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Other times its turkeys or cranes. Coyotes don't come into town but I hear them just outside town on lots of quiet nights. Black bears appear to be making a comeback in southern Michigan as well.

Personally, I'm a little tired of urban liberals flapping their gums about how badly I damage nature.
26 posted on 01/12/2012 5:46:12 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: blam
I've read (a few years ago)that there are more trees alive in the US today than there was when the Europeans first landed.

That quite possibly might be true. One problem with that, though, is that the species composition is very different. The current relative abundance of various forest habitats is maximized for timber production and other things. One side effect, though, is a loss of species diversity. A loblolly pine plantation and an old growth cove hardwood forest differ greatly in the species composition.

Probably 25 percent or more of all species are restricted to less common habitat types that occupy less than one percent of the land mass. Rare species are generally confined to rare habitats. (If they could survive well in common habitats, they would be common.) That is one of the reasons why the smaller patches of unusual habitat are more ecologically valuable than they would seem for their size.
27 posted on 01/12/2012 5:46:44 PM PST by Engraved-on-His-hands
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To: blam

We have more trees in New York than you have in Alabama. Ha ha! ;-)


28 posted on 01/12/2012 5:47:19 PM PST by decimon
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To: cripplecreek
"Large map. "

Boy howdy. I can see my little pond.(ahem)

29 posted on 01/12/2012 5:48:43 PM PST by blam
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To: dangus

>> “MIssissippi Delta” and a strange slash from Virginia (the Shenendoah Valley?) <<

Good observation about a couple of famous agricultural areas!

Also striking is the crescent sweeping from mid-Alabama up thru northeastern Mississippi, all the way to the Tennessee line. It’s an old cotton-producing area that was a stronghold of the slave-holding plantation aristocracy before the Civil War.

This latter region is often called the “Black Belt” in Alabama (mainly for its rich soil, but also for its black-majority population) and the “Prairie” in northeastern Mississippi. Fascinating how such land-using and demographic patterns have been maintained over nearly 200 years!


30 posted on 01/12/2012 5:49:50 PM PST by Hawthorn
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To: KoRn
"Would love to see what that map would have looked like 300 years ago."

Probably something like this:


31 posted on 01/12/2012 5:50:24 PM PST by Rebelbase
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To: blam

My house isn’t there.. I have 6 trees on my lot and woods next door..I love trees, they are one of my passions


32 posted on 01/12/2012 5:50:23 PM PST by RnMomof7
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To: blam; vetvetdoug

which explains post 26

I drove up the trace from Tupelo north to the Leipers Fork TN exit which is near my property

and deer everywhere for 150 miles

several scorable bucks....

btw...slight snow here...kids out...they are happy


33 posted on 01/12/2012 5:50:35 PM PST by wardaddy (I fear we cannot beat Roger Ailes and beltway GOP)
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To: corbe
Well, I encourage ya to head down to the coast[Rockport] and see the 1000-2000 year old Live oak[Goose Island Oak].


34 posted on 01/12/2012 5:52:09 PM PST by Theoria
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To: Vince Ferrer
This is a picture I took a while back at the Old North Bridge in Concord, Massachusetts, where we took our first real swing back at the British troops:

I drive by this nearly every day, and one bitter cold, windy February morning, it just struck me as I drove by, so I stopped. It was cold enough that morning with the wind to make my eyes water uncontrollably.

Interesting thing is, there are all these trees and vegetation around there, but an illustration of the area done back around that time (I saw it in a museum here) shows no trees as far as you can see in any direction! It kind of blows your mind to stand there and imagine that...

35 posted on 01/12/2012 5:52:32 PM PST by rlmorel ("A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Winston Churchill)
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To: Grunthor

I’ve been in that general neck of the woods many times. Used to go steelheading out near Forks, and there are still remnants of the original logging.
Seeing a length of a tree ten or twelve feet in diameter laying on the ground...

I drove up from somewhere on the west side of Hood Canal into the Olympic National Forest. As soon as you cross the border, the trees double and sometimes almost triple in size. Mostly cedar.


36 posted on 01/12/2012 5:54:33 PM PST by djf (http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2801220/posts)
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To: blam
my woods are lovely, dark and deep...
37 posted on 01/12/2012 5:55:13 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: blam
“I've read (a few years ago)that there are more trees alive in the US today than there was when the Europeans first landed.”

Correct-a-mundo!!!!!

That forested area betwixt the Appalachia's and the Mississippi River had a large agrarian population that had burned back most of the forest there. Disease, in advance of any pioneering, collapsed this society.

By the time settlers came they saw a mature forest. The plains native-americans ritually burned back the forest where the plains and the forest met for several reasons including simply keeping the forest at bay. Insect control and fertilization of the prairie for better grazing grass and also for a clear line of view against enemy encroachment.

38 posted on 01/12/2012 5:56:44 PM PST by Puckster
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To: Theoria; Pride in the USA

That’s a magnificent tree!


39 posted on 01/12/2012 5:58:05 PM PST by lonevoice (Klepto Baracka Marxo, impeach we much.)
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To: blam

That is true.


40 posted on 01/12/2012 6:00:00 PM PST by marty60
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To: Rebelbase

Nice!

Would have been awesome to have lived back then.(well, probably not lol). Perhaps spending a week there in a time machine would suffice. I’ll be sure to take my laptop and post my experiences on FR.


41 posted on 01/12/2012 6:00:59 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Theoria

Wow! I had no idea those things lived that long!

About twenty miles from my house was a 300 year old Maple tree called the Crocker Maple, and I believe it fell in an ice storm last year.

When I saw that tree a few years back, I admit there was something awesome about standing there looking at it, just imagining everything that tree had presided over.


42 posted on 01/12/2012 6:02:06 PM PST by rlmorel ("A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Winston Churchill)
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To: lonevoice
No kidding. It's like something out of Sherwood forest.

I can't imagine all the different hurricanes and storms it has faced over the years.

43 posted on 01/12/2012 6:02:23 PM PST by Theoria
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To: Rebelbase

Actually, most of the non-green areas in the map would have been the same 500 or 1000 years ago: prairie, desert, and mountain tundra.


44 posted on 01/12/2012 6:02:56 PM PST by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: cripplecreek

I’m with you on that, cripplecreek. Liberals think we have to baby nature, but the truth is, it is a lot more powerful than we are.

Doesn’t mean we have to intentionally mistreat it, but it is one of the reason the whole global warming scam just infuriates me.

People would be amazed at how fast nature would cover up what we have done after we are gone. Just human conceit...


45 posted on 01/12/2012 6:05:10 PM PST by rlmorel ("A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Winston Churchill)
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To: KoRn

Hahaha! That VPN tunnel back to the future will be a trick to set up!


46 posted on 01/12/2012 6:07:09 PM PST by rlmorel ("A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject." Winston Churchill)
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To: Theoria
Big ole maple tree at my grandmother's house. That's my F150 parked 25 or 30 feet behind it on the road.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
47 posted on 01/12/2012 6:07:12 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: blam
The tallest trees on earth are the coastal redwoods. But 100 years ago, that was probably not the case. They were perhaps exceeded in height by a few Douglas firs, but they were almost certainly exceeded in height by the Australian mountain ash (Eucalyptus regnans). Lumbering in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries opened up the moist forests. Catastophic fires eventually ravaged the now drying habitat.

The best habitat, in eastern Australia, has been degraded. A lesser habitat, The Styx River Valley (aka The Valley of the Giants) in Tasmania, still retains a few trees taller than 300 feet in height.

Here is a photo that gives a hint of what once was:

>
48 posted on 01/12/2012 6:08:27 PM PST by Engraved-on-His-hands
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To: rlmorel
"That VPN tunnel back to the future will be a trick to set up!"

I know I can do it! I've been working hard on getting the endpoints to talk over the distance in time. I'm sure I'll have to do away with the SHA/AES256 encryption to keep things as simple as possible for the link.

49 posted on 01/12/2012 6:14:23 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: rlmorel

I’m a true conservationist in the truest sense of the word but I don’t see anything wrong with driving dangerous animals away from population centers.

I grew up wandering the southern Michigan woods with no fear of running into anything more dangerous than a raccoon. Today we have confirmed black bears, unconfirmed mountain lions, and we’re overrun with coyotes.


50 posted on 01/12/2012 6:15:23 PM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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