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Robert E. Lee: Remembering an American Legend
Canada Free Press ^ | January 15, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 01/16/2012 10:19:34 AM PST by BigReb555

January is the birthday month of War Between the States Generals; James Longstreet born on January 8, 1821, Thomas Jonathan ‘Stonewall’ Jackson born on January 21, 1824, George Pickett born on January 28, 1825 and

Thursday, January 19, 2012, is the 205th birthday of General Robert E. Lee.

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: american; anniversary; dixie; robertelee; southerner; tribute; washingtoncollege
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Sir Winston Churchill once remarked, ‘Lee was the noblest American who had ever lived and one of the greatest commanders known to the annals of war.’

Dear students, teachers, parents, church, community leaders, historians and folks everywhere,

January is the birthday month of War Between the States Generals; James Longstreet born on January 8, 1821, Thomas Jonathan ‘Stonewall’ Jackson born on January 21, 1824, George Pickett born on January 28, 1825 and

Thursday, January 19, 2012, is the 205th birthday of General Robert E. Lee, whose memory is still dear in the hearts of people everywhere.

Many events are planned around the nation that include….

The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans Robert E. Lee Birthday Celebration in Milledgeville, Georgia on Saturday, January 21, 2012, in the Old Legislative Chambers of the Old State Capitol Building at 11 AM. A Parade will begin at 10:45 AM from the Old Governor’s Mansion to the Old Legislative Chambers.

Did you know that….

During Robert E. Lee’s 100th birthday in 1907, Charles Francis Adams, Jr., a former Union Commander and grandson of US President John Quincy Adams, spoke in tribute to Robert E. Lee at Washington and Lee College’s Lee Chapel in Lexington, Virginia? His speech was printed in both Northern and Southern newspapers and is said to had lifted Lee to a renewed respect among the American people.

Who was Robert E. Lee?

Robert E. Lee, a man whose military tactics have been studied worldwide, was an American soldier, Educator, Christian gentlemen, husband and father.

Robert E. Lee was born on Jan. 19, 1807, at ‘Stratford’ in Westmoreland County, Virginia. The winter was cold and the fireplaces were little help for Robert’s mother, Ann Hill (Carter) Lee, who suffered from a severe cold.

Ann Lee named her son ‘Robert Edward’ after two of her brothers.

Robert E. Lee undoubtedly acquired his love of country from those who lived during the American Revolution. His Father, ‘Light Horse’ Harry was a hero of the revolution and served three terms as governor of Virginia and as a member of the United States House of Representatives. Two members of his family also signed the Declaration of Independence.

Lee was educated at the schools of Alexandria, Va., and he received an appointment to the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1825. He graduated in 1829, second in his class and without a single demerit.

Robert E. Lee’s first assignment was to Cockspur Island, Georgia, to supervise the construction of Fort Pulaski.

While serving as 2nd Lieutenant of Engineers at Fort Monroe, Va., Lee wed Mary Ann Randolph Custis. Robert and Mary had grown up together, Mary was the daughter of George Washington Parke Custis, the Grandson of Martha Washington and adopted son of George Washington.

Mary was an only child; therefore, she inherited Arlington House, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., where she and Robert E. Lee raised seven children.

In 1836, Lee was appointed to first Lieutenant. In 1838, with the rank of Captain, Robert E. Lee fought in the War with Mexico and was wounded at the Battle of Chapultepec.

Lee was appointed Superintendent of the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1852.

Gen. Winfield Scott offered Lee command of the Union army to Lee on April 17, 1861, but he refused. He said, ‘I cannot raise my hand against my birthplace, my home, my children.’

The Custis-Lee Mansion ‘Arlington House’ would be occupied by Federals, who would turn the estate into a war cemetery. Today Arlington House is preserved by the National Park Service as a Memorial to Robert E. Lee. http://www.nps.gov/arho/

Lee served as adviser to President Jefferson Davis, and then on June 1, 1862, commanded the legendary Army of Northern Virginia.

After four years of death and destruction, Gen. Robert E. Lee met Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia and ended their battles.

In the fall of 1865, Lee was offered and accepted the presidency of troubled Washington College in Lexington, Virginia. It is today Washington and Lee University.

Lee was called Marse Robert, Uncle Robert and Marble Man.

Robert E. Lee died of a heart attack at 9:30 AM on the morning of October 12, 1870, at Washington College where he is buried at Lee Chapel.

Dr. Edward C. Smith, respected African-American Professor of History at American University in Washington, D.C., told the audience in Atlanta, during a 1995 Robert E. Lee birthday event, ‘Dr. Martin Luther King and Robert E. Lee were individuals worthy of emulation because they understood history.’

On August 5, 1975, 110 years after Gen. Lee's application, President Gerald Ford signed Joint Resolution 23, restoring the long overdue full rights of citizenship to Gen. Robert E. Lee. Read more at: www.ford.utexas.edu/library/speeches/750473.htm

Lest We Forget!

1 posted on 01/16/2012 10:19:41 AM PST by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

Today is Lee Jackson King Day in VA.


2 posted on 01/16/2012 10:22:55 AM PST by vmivol00
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To: BigReb555
Sir Winston Churchill once remarked, ‘Lee was the noblest American who had ever lived ..."
Really? More noble than George Washington? I don't think so.
In fact, Lee was a traitor who chose to fight against the US.
3 posted on 01/16/2012 10:23:31 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: BigReb555

Lee really messed up big at Gettysburg though.


4 posted on 01/16/2012 10:24:15 AM PST by Brilliant
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To: BigReb555
A yankee gift to our southern FReeper FRiends. I know its big but I made it big enough for a screen saver and didn't feel like resizing it for a post. Just something I was playing around with this morning.

Photobucket
5 posted on 01/16/2012 10:29:30 AM PST by cripplecreek (Stand with courage or shut up and do as you're told.)
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To: oh8eleven
In fact, Lee was a traitor who chose to fight against the US.

I'm not big on the lost cause stuff myself, but technically, George Washington was a traitor too, depending on why you ask.

6 posted on 01/16/2012 10:34:30 AM PST by Yashcheritsiy
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To: BigReb555

Huh, looks pretty good for his age...

7 posted on 01/16/2012 10:34:35 AM PST by Abathar (Proudly posting without reading the article carefully since 2004)
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To: BigReb555

Lee/Jackson Day bump


8 posted on 01/16/2012 10:37:10 AM PST by ▀udda▀udd (7 days - 7 ways a Guero y Guay Lao << >> with a floating, shifting, ever changing persona)
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To: cripplecreek

Good job.


9 posted on 01/16/2012 10:43:39 AM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: Brilliant

On a worst Military leaders in history list Lee would probably fall between Boudica and Santa Anna


10 posted on 01/16/2012 10:43:44 AM PST by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
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To: vmivol00

Lee was a great general, one of the best of the period but he was very much a legend in his own time; a legend that was stretched beyond reality. Lee gained many victories by going up against substandard union leadership who projected their intentions and movements openly. That is not to say that he was not a great tactician and strategist; he was. Lee worried that Lincoln would eventually bring in a general whom Lee would not be able to figure out and who would not back down. Lincoln did that when Grant and Sherman finally took control of the effort. Lee’s disaster at Gettysburg was in large part a result of him believing in his own press a little too strongly and unfortunately his subordinate officers and his troops also believed in the mythology a bit too much. He thought himself invincible. Longstreet was the better commander who used common sense in that engagement but he would not stand up to the “great” Bobby Lee. Lee was a traitor to his country but was still a great man in the way he comported himself after the war by working to bring former confederates back into the union.


11 posted on 01/16/2012 10:46:59 AM PST by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: vmivol00; ├čudda├čudd
Today is Lee Jackson King Day in VA.

Lee-Jackson Day has been moved to the Friday before the third Monday. It was changed about ten years ago.

12 posted on 01/16/2012 10:50:42 AM PST by FoxInSocks (B. Hussein Obama: Central Planning Czar)
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To: qam1

“On a worst Military leaders in history list Lee would probably fall between Boudica and Santa Anna”

I always thought that if the chain of command were reversed between Lee and Jackson in the East, and Bragg and Forrest in the West, the results would have been very different.

Idle speculation. It is done.


13 posted on 01/16/2012 10:57:29 AM PST by Psalm 144 (Voodoo Republicans: Don't read their lips - watch their hands.)
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To: RJS1950

The only thing Grant did differently than his predecessors was to realize that the North had an overwhelming advantage in men and material and to be willing to kill as many Union soldiers as necessary to win in a war of attrition.

Most of Sherman’s “fame” was made by waging warfare on an unarmed and defenseless civilian population.

Lee viewed Virginia as his country and was not a traitor to it.


14 posted on 01/16/2012 11:03:19 AM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: cripplecreek

Thanks, CC ... nice job.


15 posted on 01/16/2012 11:10:28 AM PST by Fast Moving Angel (Proud Right-Wing Trash -- stick it, Alec.)
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To: cripplecreek

Thank you Cripplecreek.


16 posted on 01/16/2012 11:12:02 AM PST by rightly_dividing (ICor. 15:1-4)
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To: BigReb555

Deo Vindice !

Sic Semper Tyrannis


17 posted on 01/16/2012 11:12:07 AM PST by LeoWindhorse
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To: vmivol00

I thought they moved Lee/Jackson Day a few years ago to the Friday before MLK Day.


18 posted on 01/16/2012 11:13:30 AM PST by black_diamond
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To: black_diamond

I just dated my time at VMI....ha ha. I didn’t realize it had changed.


19 posted on 01/16/2012 11:23:51 AM PST by vmivol00
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To: Locomotive Breath
Most of Sherman’s “fame” was made by waging warfare on an unarmed and defenseless civilian population.

Let me guess, you're one of those types that thinks we shouldn't have dropped atomic bombs on Japan and should have invaded instead, since we were "waging warfare on an unarmed and defenseless civilian population."
20 posted on 01/16/2012 11:27:35 AM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: Locomotive Breath

Grant was an excellent strategist as well. Did he make mistakes? Sure, and so did Lee. Grant knew how to use the advantages the union had in men and material and motivate his troops just as Lee knew how to make the best of what he had to work with.

What you put down as Serman’s “fame” is mythology as well, put forth by the defeated as an excuse for why they lost. It is pretty arrogant and ignorant to believe that the opposing force is not going to march into your territory and remove the means to continue to support your troops. Using that logic would say that allied forces should have stopped at the German border during WWII. You destroy the opposing forces ability to provide for their troops.


21 posted on 01/16/2012 11:29:11 AM PST by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: af_vet_rr

There were plenty of military targets in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki.


22 posted on 01/16/2012 11:29:58 AM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: RJS1950

Starving little children and murdering old men. Celebrate Sherman all you care to.


23 posted on 01/16/2012 11:32:30 AM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: BigReb555

Do your duty in all things.
You cannot do more.
You should never wish to do less.
~R. E. Lee


24 posted on 01/16/2012 11:37:38 AM PST by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: Locomotive Breath
There were plenty of military targets in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Plenty of defenseless civilians though. Let's face it, food sources as well as sources of revenue are legitimate military targets in a time of war, and Sherman's strategy obviously worked.

Remember, what Sherman did wasn't random destruction. After Hood gave Atlanta to Sherman, Sherman and his staff studied tax rolls and census information and determined which areas were producing a lot of food, both to feed Sherman's men, and to deny it to the Confederates. They didn't just start marching to the coast, they took specific routes for specific reasons.
25 posted on 01/16/2012 11:40:20 AM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: Yashcheritsiy

To the people in the North it was a “Civil War.”

To the politicians and media in the South it was the “War for Southern Independence.”

To the people in the South who did the killing and the dying and their families it was the “War against Northern Agression.”

The women of the South carried the hate for years and were very unforgiving. My grandmother’s middle name was Lee, she was born 1902, her grandfather had served in the Army of Virginia.


26 posted on 01/16/2012 11:43:53 AM PST by duffee (NEWT 2012)
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To: Locomotive Breath
Starving little children and murdering old men. Celebrate Sherman all you care to.

Does it bother you that we killed little children and old men in Japan and Germany during World War II? We killed almost as many people in Nagasaki and Hiroshima with just two bombs as died in the Confederacy. Throw in Hamburg and it exceeds the number of folks who died in the Confederacy.

War is hell. There are times that things are done to shorten it. It's unpleasant but the alternative was to drag things out or get involved with trench warfare, which is where things were headed with Lee. Lee was perfecting trench warfare 50 years before the first World War.

You just think that Sherman's March was bad. If the Civil War had turned into a stalemate resembling the trench warfare of World War I, there would have been a lot more death and suffering, both among the civilian and military populations. Some of Lee's trenchworks were downright scary.
27 posted on 01/16/2012 11:51:33 AM PST by af_vet_rr
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To: RJS1950
"Grant was an excellent strategist as well. Did he make mistakes? Sure, and so did Lee."

Both were excellent tacticians but I would give Grant the edge because he really never made the same mistake twice. Lee's mistakes at Gettysburg mirrored his loss at Malvern Hill and the North's loss at Fredricksburg. Attacking an army which was dug in on higher ground generally proved suicidal in the Civil War. With regard to strategy Grant was flat out superior. I don't really find much strategy at all on Lee's part at all other than to invade the North twice and both campaigns were failures and accomplished nothing but to weaken the South. The Gettyburg campaign never should have been undertaken and Longstreets plan to devote more resources to the Western campaign instead was the better play.

28 posted on 01/16/2012 11:52:31 AM PST by circlecity
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To: Yashcheritsiy
I'm not big on the lost cause stuff myself, but technically, George Washington was a traitor too, depending on why you ask.

Yes, but Washington chose the right side and Lee chose the wrong one. However, Lee was well respected during and after the war by both sides. It just seems the war would have been much shorter and much less bloody had Lee chosen the Union. Some justified Civil War losses as God's punishment for slavery and the Mexican War.

29 posted on 01/16/2012 11:53:40 AM PST by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: Locomotive Breath

I read Grant’s memoirs recently. If you have a Kindle, you can download it for free at Amazon.

He had a lot of respect for Lee, but at the same time, he was emphatic in his view that Lee was misrepresented by the press as a much greater general than he was. Having fought with Lee in Mexico, he knew that Lee was not invincible. The media in both the South and the North, however, portrayed him as such.

As far as his military philosophy was concerned, his was not all that different from Lee’s. He believed that he who attacks offensively carries the day, particularly after he’s demonstrated a time or two that he can do so and prevail. At that point, the opponent becomes demoralized, and is easily made to retreat.

As I stated, Lee had the same philosophy, but at Gettysburg, he took it way too far. He apparently began to believe that he WAS invincible. There is really no other way to describe the battle plan he concocted. It was pure recklessness.


30 posted on 01/16/2012 11:54:15 AM PST by Brilliant
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To: duffee

My grandmother’s middle name was also “Lee”.
She was born in 1900.
Her grandfather:
3/4/1862-enlisted-49th Regiment, Ga. Volunteer Inf., Army of Northern VA., Company A;
8/9/1862-Wounded at Cedar Run, Virginia-amputated right thumb;
7/3/1863-Wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania-in artillery barrage;
4/3/1865-Captured in hospital at Richmond, Virginia;
4/31/1865-Prisoner Of War in Richmond, Virginia;
6/25/1865-Released at Newport News, Virginia.


31 posted on 01/16/2012 12:00:10 PM PST by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: Repeal The 17th
So what,??? I think we have had enough eulogized of this loser. Everyone was born at some time or other. Lee is no different.If he had not married who he did he would have still been an unknown, sorting toilet paper in some no name post.
32 posted on 01/16/2012 12:08:50 PM PST by BooBoo1000 ("Think for yourself")
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To: Brilliant

“Lee really messed up big at Gettysburg though.”

Gettysburg was NOT considered, by either side, as a game changer back when it happened, and for a long time afterwards. Those who win the wars get to write the histories.

Washington, Jefferson, Lee, Jackson and so many others - makes me proud my roots were there.


33 posted on 01/16/2012 12:14:51 PM PST by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
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To: Brilliant
I read Grant’s memoirs recently. If you have a Kindle, you can download it for free at Amazon.

I did exactly that several months ago, and I must say, it was a very good read. Grant was a pretty good writer.

And if you haven't read it, get Longstreet's memoir (also available on Kindle). It also is a very good read.

It is very interesting to see the war (and all the background prior to the war) through the eyes of some key players on both sides. It underscores the reality that it was not a war exclusively to "Free The Slaves™"
34 posted on 01/16/2012 12:17:11 PM PST by LaRueLaDue
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To: Repeal The 17th

My Grandmother’s grandfather enlisted in the Georgia 21st Infantry and was at the Battle of the 2nd Manassas. The first day was known as the Battle of Groverton. The Ga. 21st was under General Thomas Jacksons command. He was discharged and sent home Oct, 1862 with the measles and re-enlisted Spring 1863 in the Georgia 8th Infantry and was wounded June 1864 at Cold Harbor, Virginia. He was sent home to recuperate but was unable to return.


35 posted on 01/16/2012 12:20:43 PM PST by duffee (NEWT 2012)
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To: duffee

“Strike the tents”


36 posted on 01/16/2012 12:23:28 PM PST by duffee (NEWT 2012)
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To: duffee
The women of the South carried the hate for years and were very unforgiving.

My wife still feels this way today and has never crossed the Mason-Dixon line.

37 posted on 01/16/2012 12:36:56 PM PST by packrat35 (When will we admit we are know almost a police state?)
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To: BooBoo1000

“...we have had enough eulogized of this loser...”
-
What is your purpose for being here?


38 posted on 01/16/2012 12:39:44 PM PST by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: Repeal The 17th

The funny thing these Yankees forget is the Northern States are now full of hard-core democrats and Communists when it come time to vote.

The South is where more Conservatives are located today.


39 posted on 01/16/2012 12:43:11 PM PST by packrat35 (When will we admit we are know almost a police state?)
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To: LaRueLaDue

Read Grant’s, Sherman’s, and now am working on Sheridan’s. I did not know about Longstreet’s, but will take a look at it as well.

Sherman’s was actually very interesting. He becomes a bit defensive at points. He virtually ignores the burning of Atlanta. He talks about the burning of Columbia, mainly to disavow any intent on his part to burn it.

What was most interesting to me was to see the names of places I’m familiar with in there.

My favorite part of the book though, was a part about the aftermath of Bull Run. Some soldier came up to him and told him he was leaving for home in the morning, to which Sherman replied, “How can you leave? I have not signed any such papers.” The soldier explained that he had a 90 day enlistment, and needed to get back to his law practice as his enlistment had expired some days earlier. Sherman, seeing that other soldiers were listening, realized that if this guy were permitted to leave, his entire regiment would soon leave as well. Therefore he shouted for everyone to hear that “You are forbidden to leave, and if you do, I will track you down and have you shot!”

The soldier was of course shocked, but did not challenge him. Later in the day, Lincoln came by in a buggie to see how his troops were doing. Sherman, of course, met Lincoln and arranged for the President to speak to his men. The lawyer approached, and told Lincoln that he had a grievance. Pointing to Sherman, he said “He threatened to shoot me!”

Lincoln said, “Threatened to shoot you?”

“Yes sir... Threatened to shoot me.”

Lincoln looked at the man, then looked at Sherman. Then looked at the man, and then looked at Sherman. Then he said to the man, “Well, if he threatened to shoot you, then I would be very afraid, because I believe he would do it.”

The men standing around broke out laughing. Later, Sherman explained what had happened to Lincoln, and he responded, “Well I did not know what it was about, but I figured you know your business.” Sherman assured Lincoln that the President’s reaction would make it much easier to maintain discipline in the future.


40 posted on 01/16/2012 12:47:00 PM PST by Brilliant
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To: BooBoo1000

“If he had not married who he did he would have still been an unknown, sorting toilet paper in some no name post.”

His service in the U. S. Armed Forces before the Civil War disproves this statement in and of itself. His private life both before and after his service is more than sufficient evidence to make your statement ridiculous.


41 posted on 01/16/2012 1:35:04 PM PST by Samson0254 (Nothing is impossible for those who don't have to do it or pay for it.)
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To: Moonman62

Being that I’m from the Midwest originally (though my state had its own nasty little civil-war-within-the-Civil_war), I just don’t see why people are still going on about it 150 years after it ended.


42 posted on 01/16/2012 1:48:15 PM PST by Yashcheritsiy
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To: af_vet_rr
You just think that Sherman's March was bad. If the Civil War had turned into a stalemate resembling the trench warfare of World War I, there would have been a lot more death and suffering, both among the civilian and military populations. Some of Lee's trenchworks were downright scary.

Ironically, Sherman's march helped to shorten the war. Sherman was smart enough to avoid a lot of the stalemating head-on collision of forces that were so common in the CW. He preferred a war of manoeuvre and surprise. Part of what made him so feared by the South was that you just didn't know exactly where he was going to turn up striking. He split his columns, and they didn't know if he was going for Savannah, or if he was heading south into Florida, or if he was going to turn up into South Carolina, or what. As a result, the Southerners tended to hole up behind entrenchments in cities, while he just went around them and lived off the land, while demoralising the entire Confederacy, but especially its plantation class.

Shoot, if I'd been a Northern general, I'd have done the same thing.

Of course, if I'd been a Southern general, I would have cut loose and burned an arc from Cincinnati to Philadelphia, shipping machinery and machine tools back along my track the whole way across.

43 posted on 01/16/2012 1:57:03 PM PST by Yashcheritsiy
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To: Brilliant

Lee’s real problem at Gettysburg was the loss of Jackson who was his #1 offensive field commander. Longstreet was much better on defense. That and Stuart suffering from an attack of the stupids and depriving Lee of intelligence by riding off in search of glory.


44 posted on 01/16/2012 2:01:12 PM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: af_vet_rr
Let me guess, you're one of those types that thinks we shouldn't have dropped atomic bombs on Japan and should have invaded instead, since we were "waging warfare on an unarmed and defenseless civilian population."

Let me guess, you're one of those types that equates the War of Southern Independence to Naziism and Japanese Imperialism. Placing Southerner in your pathetic mind on par with those peoples, really?

45 posted on 01/16/2012 2:01:41 PM PST by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Locomotive Breath

You are very right about Jackson, but Lee’s mistakes at Gettysburg were so incredible that I find myself asking if maybe it was actually Jackson who was the smart one instead of Lee.

I heard recently while watching a History Channel show that some scholars think Lee may have suffered a heart attack just before Gettysburg, which precluded him from thinking clearly. I can see why they might think that, given what he did, but it strikes me as just an attempt to make excuses for him.

An interesting question in my mind is whether Longstreet maybe should have handled it differently. Could he have removed Lee? Could he have at least been more forceful in his argument? He clearly knew that what Lee was doing would bring down the Confederacy, but he did not stop him.

Apparently, his deference to authority was greater than his desire for a Confederate victory. I suppose that is something he learned at West Point, but actually having to make the decision in real life is something very different from theory.


46 posted on 01/16/2012 2:18:14 PM PST by Brilliant
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To: af_vet_rr

Next you’ll be telling me that the victorious Japanese raping undefended Nanking, Manilla and so many others was also justified as a normal part of war.

Hamburg, Hiroshima and Nagasaki all were legitimate military targets surrounded by civilian populations. To attack military targets, the civilians also ended up being attacked. In modern parlance, this is known as “collateral damage”.

As there were no effective military forces opposing him, the only legitimate military objective for Sherman was the southern rail net. Transportation of goods and military supplies having been completely brought to a halt, pillage and killing in the surrounding undefended rural countryside had no military value and did nothing to shorten the war. As Sherman himself proudly stated it was simply for the sake of retribution and revenge.

Find me another more example in U.S. military history where an undefended civilian population was attacked specifically for the sake of attacking civilians without any legitimate military objective.

In any event, his actions don’t make Sherman some kind of military genius. In the long run, if the goal was to reunify the country, Sherman’s actions, and the subsequent revenge and retribution in the form of “Reconstruction”, were counter productive.

As the north, from Wisconsin to Massachusetts, spirals into economic oblivion the south will be arriving to help any day now. Or maybe not.

The war DID turn into stalemate trench warfare around Richmond. Beyond tearing up the railways, Sherman’s rapine had no impact in Virginia. Grant made costly frontal attack after costly frontal attack against heavily fortified positions. The eventual difference there was that Grant had overwhelming superiority and could “afford” the losses. Grant was simply able to stretch the lines to such a distance that the defenders were spread too thin and Grant was about to get around behind the defenders.


47 posted on 01/16/2012 2:41:37 PM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: circlecity

I would probably agree that Grant was probably superior and the evidence is in the fact that he along with his handpicked subordinates such as Sherman proved that they were superior by winning. Longstreet is another whom I believe was better than Lee in strategic and tactical thought. Longstreet seemed more able to evaluate the circumstance of the moment and come up with viable plans of action. The difference between him and Lee was that Longstreet’s thinking was not skewed by the accolades he received. The mythology of Lee and his invincibility will not go away anytime soon, even after all of these years.


48 posted on 01/16/2012 2:41:47 PM PST by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: Brilliant

Lee knew Longstreet was always “Mr. Negative” and discounted his advice on many occasions. Had Jackson been there and advised then something else might have been done.

In battle after battle, Longstreet defended against a Union attack while Jackson maneuvered for a counterstrike with Lee conducting from on high with faith in each field commander’s strength in his respective role. Lee’s version of Patton’s “We’re going to hold onto him by the nose, and we’re going to kick him in the ass.”

With Jackson gone, one of the essential elements that had served the south so well was gone. Cut off one leg from a three-legged stool and the stool falls over.


49 posted on 01/16/2012 2:51:08 PM PST by Locomotive Breath
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To: Locomotive Breath

Where is the documentation that any of that happened? As in all wars, those things happen and did I’m sure along the way there were incidents but there is little evidence that most of what went on was anthing more than sporadic and to say that Sherman or his subordinates ordered it is pure BS. As far as taking food from little kids mouths goes, the confederate armies also confiscated what they needed as they marched through the south in the latter part of the war. There are so many claims that this town or that was pillaged and burned when the towns mentioned were nowhere near the path of the troop movement that the whole narrative becomes ridiculous.

The south lost, get over it.


50 posted on 01/16/2012 2:53:07 PM PST by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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