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Lawyer Withdraws Mystery Lotto Winner Claim
KCCI Channel 8 Des Moines ^ | January 23, 2012 | Uncredited

Posted on 01/27/2012 5:17:13 AM PST by jjotto

Lottery Calls Series Of Events 'Strangest Situation' In 26-Year History

DES MOINES, Iowa -- A New York lawyer, acting as the trustee for what is called the Hexham Investment Trust, has indicated he will not pursue a claim for a $14 million lottery jackpot.

Just after 6 p.m. Thursday, lawyers in Des Moines representing attorney Crawford Shaw said he is withdrawing his claim for the "Hot Lotto" ticket that was submitted to Iowa Lottery officials just hours before a Dec. 29, 2011 deadline. The ticket had been purchased at a Des Moines convenience store a year earlier.

Lottery officials said there were conditions that had to be met before they would release the winning the jackpot, including the identity of the purchaser and whether the ticket was legally purchased, presented and possessed.

The statement by the Davis Brown law firm said, "The purchaser has chosen to remain anonymous. The identity of the purchaser has not been disclosed to Shaw."

Shaw told a reporter for the Reuters news service he was giving up the claim because "I'm not going to argue with the lottery."

The statement from the Des Moines lawyers concluded Shaw "has agreed to take no further action." But Lottery officials say the Iowa Attorney General and the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation (DCI) will continue to investigate the situation to see if any laws were broken.

A lottery statement Thursday night called the series of events "the strangest situation that we can recall in the 26-year history of our lottery."

"We couldn't verify the winner. That's the bottom line. We could verify the winner and they could claim it," said Iowa Lottery CEO Terry Rich. "If, in fact, Mr. Shaw, as a trustee, could provide the information, we were ready to write the check tomorrow at 3 p.m."

Lottery officials said the $10.7 million will be returned to the multistate lottery commission, and Iowa will get roughly $1.3 million back.


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: Iowa
KEYWORDS: hotlotto; lottery
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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...the Iowa Attorney General and the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation (DCI) will continue to investigate the situation to see if any laws were broken.
1 posted on 01/27/2012 5:17:20 AM PST by jjotto
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To: Orange1998; justlurking; theDentist

Follow up info:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2827003/posts


2 posted on 01/27/2012 5:19:46 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: jjotto
...the Iowa Attorney General and the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation (DCI) will continue to investigate the situation to see if any laws were broken.

Interesting. I wonder what they will say if they found the Iowa Lottery is the one that broke the law.

Every lottery that I have seen has a statement on the back of the ticket to the effect that: this is a bearer instrument until signed. That means that as long as the ticket is valid, the holder is entitled to the proceeds.

Perhaps the law authorizing the Iowa Lottery is different. But if it isn't, they just destroyed their own integrity. If the Iowa Lottery can refuse to pay this claim, then they can refuse to pay any claim. Iowans should seriously reconsider playing that lottery, and instead make a trip into a neighboring state.

3 posted on 01/27/2012 5:45:35 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

I’m wondering if there isn’t more to this story than we know. For example, is the lottery winner wanted by the police for a serious crime? (Is that why he or she would rather remain anonymous than claim millions?) Is the ticket a fake? I just get the impression there is a lot more to this story than we know.


4 posted on 01/27/2012 5:54:27 AM PST by momtothree
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To: justlurking

mmm...

Even a state that allows a winner to be ‘anonymous’ only allows the winner to be anonymous to the public, not to the lottery itself.

The shady lawyer involved won’t even explain how the person in the video who bought the ticket transferred possession. Stolen or forged tickets needn’t be honored.

Seems like lawyer just should have said it was his and paid the taxes.


5 posted on 01/27/2012 5:58:14 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: momtothree

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20120120/NEWS/301200029/Attorney-mysterious-lottery-winner-named-lawsuit

...Crawford Shaw, who is trying to claim a jackpot worth much as $14.2 million on behalf of his client, Hexam Investments Trust, is being sued over his involvement in a now-bankrupt company called Industrial Enterprises of America Inc...

...Iowa law requires a winner to give his name and address when claiming a prize. The winner does not have to make a public appearance or a public statement, though most have done so...


6 posted on 01/27/2012 6:03:45 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: jjotto

Thanks for the link, jjotto! Lots more to this story than the initial reading!


7 posted on 01/27/2012 6:10:23 AM PST by momtothree
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To: jjotto
Even a state that allows a winner to be ‘anonymous’ only allows the winner to be anonymous to the public, not to the lottery itself.

That's not correct. Every state (except Iowa, it appears) honors the ownership of a ticket by a legal entity, such as a trust. Actually, even Iowa is supposed to, according to their rules:

https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IAC/LINC/10-19-2011.Chapter.531.11.pdf

The shady lawyer involved won’t even explain how the person in the video who bought the ticket transferred possession. Stolen or forged tickets needn’t be honored.

It doesn't say so in this article, but an earlier article says that the ticket has been validated by the lottery. So, it's not forged. And the 30 or so claims that the ticket had been stolen from them had been investigated, and found without merit.

Seems like lawyer just should have said it was his and paid the taxes.

He can't. He represents the trust. And if the beneficiary of the trust doesn't want to be identified, the attorney can't do so -- or he can be disbarred.

8 posted on 01/27/2012 6:14:10 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: momtothree
I’m wondering if there isn’t more to this story than we know.

I'm sure there is a lot more to the story. The actual winner probably wants to conceal his newfound gain from someone in his past.

It could be a messy divorce, or a bad business deal. He could even be in the witness protection program.

But, the ticket isn't a fake. The lottery has already validated it.

9 posted on 01/27/2012 6:16:22 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

You should make a deal with Crawford Shaw!


10 posted on 01/27/2012 6:18:09 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: jjotto
Iowa law requires a winner to give his name and address when claiming a prize. The winner does not have to make a public appearance or a public statement, though most have done so...

I think this is someone's misinterpretation, if they are trying to imply an individual must identify himself. The Iowa lottery's doesn't say that:

https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IAC/LINC/10-19-2011.Chapter.531.11.pdf

Maybe I missed something, but it specifically says that a legal entity (such as a trust) can claim the prize. This is what is typically used in other states that require that the winner be identified.

11 posted on 01/27/2012 6:20:18 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking
I'm sure there is a lot more to the story. The actual winner probably wants to conceal his newfound gain from someone in his past.

Another possibility: In some cases, major lottery prizes go unclaimed because the winner is in the country illegally -- no one really checks much on the middle-tier prizes, which is what they're playing for, but a jackpot is going to invite... unwelcome scrutiny.

Same basic idea, though -- the winner wants the money, but has a strong reason to not let anyone know about it.

12 posted on 01/27/2012 6:20:36 AM PST by kevkrom (Note to self: proofread, then post. It's better that way.)
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To: justlurking

Perhaps there is a misunderstanding of

531—11.1(99G) Claiming prizes. 11.1(1)...

and of

531—11.3(99G) Invalid tickets not entitled to prize payment. If a ticket presented to the lottery is invalid pursuant to the terms of these rules or the specific game rules, the ticket is not entitled to prize payment...


13 posted on 01/27/2012 6:27:13 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: justlurking

>>>Every lottery that I have seen has a statement on the back of the ticket to the effect that: this is a bearer instrument until signed. That means that as long as the ticket is valid, the holder is entitled to the proceeds.

True - but subject to validation of ownership of the ticket... got to know who they’re taxing when they withhold taxes from the winnings.

There is no integrity problem with the Iowa lottery...this is strong evidence to the contrary. The out-of state lawyer involved has a less then stellar reputation, which proceeded him.


14 posted on 01/27/2012 6:27:48 AM PST by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: jjotto
You should make a deal with Crawford Shaw!

Actually, I would have hired another attorney, and filed suit against the Iowa Lottery.

The Iowa Lottery is apparently trying to use 531—11.11(99G) to avoid paying the ticket:

Stolen or lost tickets. The lottery has no responsibility for paying prizes attributable to stolen or lost tickets.

This is an abuse of a provision that is intended to indemnify the lottery against claims from people that say they lost a ticket or it was stolen from them, and can't produce it for validation.

The ticket isn't lost. And if the lottery thinks the ticket is stolen, it's their responsibility to prove it. They claim to want to know the chain of custody, but their own rules say that the ticket is a bearer instrument until signed. So, the chain of custody is none of their business.

15 posted on 01/27/2012 6:28:04 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: Keith in Iowa
True - but subject to validation of ownership of the ticket... got to know who they’re taxing when they withhold taxes from the winnings.

The trust owns the ticket. The EIN of the trust is used for withholding purposes. The lottery's own rules provide for this.

https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IAC/LINC/10-19-2011.Chapter.531.11.pdf

See 11.1(1).

A tax return is filed for the trust, and passes the tax liability to the beneficiaries. The IRS (both federal and state) will get the income taxes. If they decide to connect the dots, those agencies can then figure out who actually won. But, they are bound by law to keep it confidential.

There is no integrity problem with the Iowa lottery...this is strong evidence to the contrary. The out-of state lawyer involved has a less then stellar reputation, which proceeded him.

The lawyer may have a less than stellar reputation, but he presented a valid ticket. What part of the Iowa Lottery Code requires that winners be of good character?

16 posted on 01/27/2012 6:41:00 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

Okay, let’s say that the holder of the ticket has a really good reason to forfeit millions of dollars. Can he or she make a contract with another person to split the proceeds and give the ticket to a second person to claim as their own? For example, Mike has the ticket but gives the ticket to John. John has already signed a contract stating he will split the money to a percentage agreed upon by both. Can’t “John” claim the ticket? If so, “Mike” can go nameless with the lottery board.


17 posted on 01/27/2012 6:41:28 AM PST by momtothree
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To: jjotto
531—11.3(99G) Invalid tickets not entitled to prize payment.

The lottery is not contending that the ticket is invalid.

In a previous article, they specifically said that the ticket had been validated:

Lottery officials said at a news conference on Thursday that their investigation of the security procedures continues and that the ticket was valid. "It's been validated. It's been proven that that is the ticket that was sold. We have all of our security features confirmed in that," said Lottery CEO Terry Rich.

18 posted on 01/27/2012 6:45:11 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

Blow.

The so called “trust” is dropped the claim. The lottery has followed their rules and state law. There is ZERO claim to the contrary, other than YOU. There is no problem here. Other than you.


19 posted on 01/27/2012 6:49:02 AM PST by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: momtothree
Okay, let’s say that the holder of the ticket has a really good reason to forfeit millions of dollars.

This is what I find really interesting about this: that someone would give up so easily. Even if it was a messy divorce, the worst that could happen is he has to split it.

I'm wondering if the real winner has a compelling reason to remain anonymous, as in a price on his head.

Can he or she make a contract with another person to split the proceeds and give the ticket to a second person to claim as their own?

Some lotteries prohibit resale of a ticket. But, there's nothing that prevents you from sharing a ticket. The IRS might get involved and demand proof of "co-ownership", or they will assess a gift tax.

Typically, co-owners of a ticket create a revocable trust to claim the ticket, and then use that legal entity to redistribute the proceeds. Since the ticket is a bearer instrument, I don't believe there is anything that prevents that.

20 posted on 01/27/2012 6:52:54 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: jjotto

Thanks for reposting that thread. I knew something smelled on this one once I started looking into the details.

It is fascinating that the story loops around to JFK.

It is quite possible that once they saw no one was claiming the ticket some entity manufactured a ticket.

If it was a real ticket they could just hand it off to a front man to claim and split the proceeds.

Something really is off about this one.


21 posted on 01/27/2012 6:54:54 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: momtothree

There IS more to this story. I posted on a thread somewhere info about Crawford Shaw.

It starts with him being involved with the penny stock trade and loops around to JFK.


22 posted on 01/27/2012 6:58:45 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: Keith in Iowa
The so called “trust” is dropped the claim.

Yes, I find that very curious. Since the attorney representing the trust has a valid claim, apparently the beneficiary of the trust doesn't want to risk being identified. I do wonder why.

The lottery has followed their rules and state law.

I've actually read the rules and state law. I don't see anything that gives the Iowa Lottery the authority to withhold payment. Do you? Here, I'll even provide them for you:

https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/ACO/IAC/LINC/10-19-2011.Chapter.531.11.pdf

There is ZERO claim to the contrary, other than YOU. There is no problem here. Other than you.

I have no problem. However, I think the Iowa Lottery has a serious problem, if the beneficiary changes his mind and decides to pursue this. A jury might even decide to aware punitive damages.

He should hire a different lawyer, though. That's not a problem -- all he has to do is appoint a new trustee for the trust.

23 posted on 01/27/2012 7:00:56 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: RummyChick
It is quite possible that once they saw no one was claiming the ticket some entity manufactured a ticket.

Not according to the Iowa Lottery:

Lottery officials said at a news conference on Thursday that their investigation of the security procedures continues and that the ticket was valid. "It's been validated. It's been proven that that is the ticket that was sold. We have all of our security features confirmed in that," said Lottery CEO Terry Rich.

24 posted on 01/27/2012 7:02:52 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking
The actual winner probably wants to conceal his newfound gain from someone in his past.

Or someone in the future - like the 450 long lost relatives who will sudden turn up.

25 posted on 01/27/2012 7:04:05 AM PST by CommerceComet (Governor Romney, why would any conservative vote for the author of the beta version of ObamaCare?)
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To: justlurking

This lawyer was hired for a reason.
He is not the run of the mill lawyer

The war buddy of JFK (who was affliated with Shaw) has a son that is also involved with at least one of Shaw’s penny stocks. The son has a very impressive resume..INCLUDING starting a bank in Russia.THE first of it’s kind.

He is now in the oil business.


26 posted on 01/27/2012 7:05:33 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: CommerceComet

“sudden” - should be “suddenly”. I saw that just as I hit send.


27 posted on 01/27/2012 7:05:58 AM PST by CommerceComet (Governor Romney, why would any conservative vote for the author of the beta version of ObamaCare?)
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To: justlurking

I dont know. It is possible that some entity could manufacturer a lottery ticket. When no one claimed it they swooped in. I think it is possible that there is someone out there that could manufacture it. Keep in mind the connections of Crawford Shaw.

But we can go with the idea that it is a legitimate ticket.

HOWEVER, the story stinks to high heaven.


28 posted on 01/27/2012 7:08:49 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: CommerceComet

“... like the 450 long lost relatives who will suddenly show up”.

Would your forfeit seven million dollars so you wouldn’t have to deal with long lost relatives? If that was the main issue, he could have simply rented another house, claimed the ticket and left. For that kind of money, I would deal with your relatives and mine!


29 posted on 01/27/2012 7:10:30 AM PST by momtothree
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To: RummyChick
This lawyer was hired for a reason. He is not the run of the mill lawyer

I don't doubt that. But, the lottery has already admitted that the ticket is valid. Their own rules provide for a legal entity with a federal EIN to claim the prize.

I can see that people don't like this guy. But, where does the Lottery's own code allow them to arbitrarily deny a claim because they don't?

30 posted on 01/27/2012 7:11:04 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

Misunderstanding of ‘invalid’.

“A prize claim shall be entered in the name of a single individual or organization. A claim may be entered in the name of an organization only if the organization is a legal entity and possesses or has applied for a federal employer’s identification number (FEIN) as issued by the Internal Revenue Service. Groups, family units, organizations, clubs, or other organizations that are not legal entities, do not possess a FEIN, or have not applied for a FEIN must designate one individual in whose name the claim will be entered.”

Face it, the lawyer screwed up (or was scamming). There are ways this could have been collected. Someone didn’t do their homework.


31 posted on 01/27/2012 7:16:00 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: kevkrom
Another possibility: In some cases, major lottery prizes go unclaimed because the winner is in the country illegally

That would be a poor reason to not claim a prize, especially of this magnitude.

There was a running joke in California: every time someone won a big lottery prize, one wondered who was going home to Mexico this time.

Someone in the country illegally is still entitled to the prize. I read recently that a lottery tried to deny a payment, but was successfully challenged. The winner paid the income taxes and went home.

32 posted on 01/27/2012 7:21:36 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: justlurking

Okay.
Legitimate Ticket as announced by the Lottery.

Rules that allow for a trust to claim it.

BUT there are claims that the ticket was stolen.

Yes, this often happens with lottery tickets.

Nonetheless, the claims exist.

Therefore, it seems to me that the Lottery has a duty to investigate who owns that ticket.

Have they given out a ticket to a trust when there were claims of the ticket having been stolen in the past???

If so, then there might be a problem.

It’s my understanding that Shaw won’t even meet with the Lottery officials. Come on. A lawyer won’t meet with the lottery?????? A lawyer involved with the man who was Second in Command of the United States Treasury under JFK.

Let’s say a mobster held the winning ticket.
Simple, just hand it over to a front man.

Illegal Alien- same thing.

Mobster holding a Fake ticket and afraid of getting caught - bail on the whole thing.

For all we know, it could be a sting operation with the lottery saying it was a legitimate ticket when it really wasn’t. But then where is the real ticket? There have been lottery tickets that have gone unclaimed.

Whatever the case, this will probably go down in lottery history as the biggest mystery ever.


33 posted on 01/27/2012 7:21:42 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: RummyChick
BUT there are claims that the ticket was stolen. Yes, this often happens with lottery tickets. Nonetheless, the claims exist.

Officials said all the claims they have investigated so far that the ticket was stolen have turned out to be false.

Therefore, it seems to me that the Lottery has a duty to investigate who owns that ticket.

According to the rules of the Iowa Lottery (and all the others): a lottery ticket is a bearer instrument. Whoever signs it and presents it is the owner.

The Lottery's insistence on the chain of custody is not supported by their own rules.

It’s my understanding that Shaw won’t even meet with the Lottery officials.

Lottery Meets Lawyer In Hot Lotto Mystery

34 posted on 01/27/2012 7:29:00 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: RummyChick

>>>It’s my understanding that Shaw won’t even meet with the Lottery officials. Come on. A lawyer won’t meet with the lottery??????

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/article/20120127/NEWS/301270040/-14-3-million-Hot-Lotto-prize-claim-withdrawn

They’ve met... click story.


35 posted on 01/27/2012 7:29:24 AM PST by Keith in Iowa (Willard Romney, purveyor of the world's finest bullmitt. | FR Class of 1998 |)
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To: jjotto
Face it, the lawyer screwed up (or was scamming). There are ways this could have been collected. Someone didn’t do their homework.

I'm not sure what you are referring to. The first two sentences of your cite say:

A prize claim shall be entered in the name of a single individual or organization. A claim may be entered in the name of an organization only if the organization is a legal entity and possesses or has applied for a federal employer’s identification number (FEIN) as issued by the Internal Revenue Service.

A trust is an organization. It is a legal entity, and has a Federal EIN.

The attorney was the trustee, and represented the trust. The actual winner was presumably the beneficiary. If the beneficiary instructs the trustee to not reveal his identity, then the attorney has no choice -- or he faces disbarment.

36 posted on 01/27/2012 7:37:21 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: Keith in Iowa

So the story told to the public is:

A trust presents a valid ticket.

On the face it meets the requirements.

But, there must be something that raised a red flag.

The public isn’t always told everything.

There is a video of the purchaser. They want to verify possession or transfer of possession.

The trust lawyer has admitted he has no idea who purchased the ticket. Therefore, he has no idea if that ticket that was in his possession was obtained legally or illegally.

Perhaps that is the red flag.


37 posted on 01/27/2012 7:38:02 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: justlurking

Does the attorney know the identity of the Beneficiary?

He states he doesn’t know the identity of the purchaser.

So the beneficiary could have stolen or extorted the winning ticket.

It seems to me the beneficiary’s picture doesn’t match the one on the video.

The beneficiary doesn’t want his face known even to lottery officials and/or doesn’t want to tell how he got the ticket.


38 posted on 01/27/2012 7:44:01 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: justlurking

That’s the point: The winner is willing to give up millions of dollars to remain completely anonymous.

The winner may be hiding from the mafia, not the from legal judgments or tax liens.

Shaw, BTW, would not reveal any details about the trust.


39 posted on 01/27/2012 7:48:06 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: RummyChick

Shaw’s lawyers confirmed to lottery officials that money in the trust was funneled to a corporation in Belize, according to lottery spokeswoman Mary Neubauer.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/mysterious-iowa-lottery-winner-withdraws-claim/story?id=15455933


40 posted on 01/27/2012 7:48:16 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: jjotto

listen to this video:

http://abcnews.go.com/US/mystery-lottery-winner-lose-jackpot-friday-explains/story?id=15439568


41 posted on 01/27/2012 7:51:50 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: RummyChick

“Neubeauer noted that the man who signed the ticket, Crawford Shaw, is involved in criminal and bankruptcy proceedings in New York and Delaware, a fact which she said could turn out to be irrelevant, but needs to be looked into. “
http://abcnews.go.com/US/mystery-lottery-winner-lose-jackpot-friday-explains/story?id=15439568

Hmmm..what criminal proceedings??


42 posted on 01/27/2012 7:53:20 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: RummyChick
The trust lawyer has admitted he has no idea who purchased the ticket.

A small clarification:

The statement by the Davis Brown law firm said, "The purchaser has chosen to remain anonymous. The identity of the purchaser has not been disclosed to Shaw."

Shaw didn't actually say this. He sent the ticket to a Des Moines law firm with instructions for them to claim the prize on behalf of the trust. Davis Brown is the local law firm.

But, this is one of the things that I find curious: that the trustee doesn't know who the beneficiary is. I'm not quite sure how one would do this: set up a trust with one trustee, and then have the first trustee appoint a second trustee -- without telling him who the beneficiary is?

I'm wondering if there's a typo in the statement. Maybe the last sentence was supposed to be: The identity of the purchaser has not been disclosed by Shaw?

43 posted on 01/27/2012 7:54:13 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: momtothree
Would your forfeit seven million dollars so you wouldn’t have to deal with long lost relatives?

No. I didn't expect someone to take my flippant statement seriously. However, avoiding requests for financial assistance (from friends, relatives, charities, etc.) would be a reason that I would remain anonymous if I won the lottery. But I wouldn't walk away from that much money to remain anonymous.

44 posted on 01/27/2012 7:54:52 AM PST by CommerceComet (Governor Romney, why would any conservative vote for the author of the beta version of ObamaCare?)
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To: RummyChick

I believe the criminal proceedings involve ‘illegally’ obtaining stocks and then fraudulently inflating their value. Probably some FReeper can explain what the heck that might mean!


45 posted on 01/27/2012 7:58:45 AM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: RummyChick
I'm wondering if there's a typo in the statement. Maybe the last sentence was supposed to be: The identity of the purchaser has not been disclosed by Shaw?

I think it was indeed a misstatement or misquote. The article that you posted from ABC news says:

Lottery officials asked the attorneys and Shaw to explain how the ticket had ended up in his possession in New York. Shaw declined to provide the details, but said he did not know who purchased the ticket and that he could not identify his client, who had come to possess the ticket. He said he merely represented his client and the trust.

Note that he said that he could not identify his client. He didn't say that he didn't know the client. This is consistent with a trust: the trustee can't identify the beneficiary without permission. However, the information can be obtained with a court order.

46 posted on 01/27/2012 8:00:25 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: jjotto
That’s the point: The winner is willing to give up millions of dollars to remain completely anonymous.

Yeah, I wonder about that. He must really be afraid of something.

The winner may be hiding from the mafia, not the from legal judgments or tax liens.

I speculated earlier that he might be in the witness protection program. He might also be hiding from a criminal past, like Whitey Bulger did for 16 years.

Shaw, BTW, would not reveal any details about the trust.

Legally, and ethically (according to bar rules), I don't think he can without a court order.

47 posted on 01/27/2012 8:04:23 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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To: jjotto

Lottery: A voluntary tax on the stupid.


48 posted on 01/27/2012 8:04:43 AM PST by ConservaTexan (February 6, 1911)
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To: justlurking

They are funneling money to Belize.

Not illegal.

Just a red flag.

You can have a chain of multiple trusts.

If I won the lottery I would use at least two trusts.

Shaw misspelled the name of the trust on the lottery ticket.

So therefore, technically, it wasn’t signed for by the right owner.

Let’s say someone is laundering money. They have trust accounts in Russia, Belize, Switzerland and all with trusts.

Mobster Kingpin extorts the ticket. Innocent ticket holder and his family will be killed if he tells.
Mobster Kingpin uses one or more trusts to claim the ticket.

Shaw may not even know Mobster Kingpin is behind it.

You can have one trust to claim a ticket and then it can be handed over to another trust.

Given that one of Shaw’s connections set up a bank in Russia it would not surprise me if there aren’t some Russians involved somewhere with this.

I don’t know that we will ever know the story.


49 posted on 01/27/2012 8:07:00 AM PST by RummyChick (It's a Satan Sandwich with Satan Fries on the side - perfect for Obama 666)
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To: RummyChick
You can have a chain of multiple trusts. If I won the lottery I would use at least two trusts.

Not if you live in Iowa. :-)

They will think you are doing something illegal.

And yes, I'd do the a similar thing: one trust, which only lasts long enough to transfer the funds into a family limited partnership.

50 posted on 01/27/2012 8:13:55 AM PST by justlurking (The only remedy for a bad guy with a gun is a good WOMAN (Sgt. Kimberly Munley) with a gun)
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