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Bigger US role against companies' cyberthreats?
Associated Press ^ | Sunday, February 5, 2012 12:57 PM EST | LOLITA C. BALDOR

Posted on 02/05/2012 10:44:03 AM PST by Hunton Peck

A developing Senate plan that would bolster the government's ability to regulate the computer security of companies that run critical industries is drawing strong opposition from businesses that say it goes too far and security experts who believe it should have even more teeth.

Legislation set to come out in the days ahead is intended to ensure that computer systems running power plants and other essential parts of the country's infrastructure are protected from hackers, terrorists or other criminals. The Department of Homeland Security, with input from businesses, would select which companies to regulate; the agency would have the power to require better computer security, according to officials who described the bill. They spoke on condition of anonymity because lawmakers have not finalized all the details.

Those are the most contentious parts of legislation designed to boost cybersecurity against the constant attacks that target U.S. government, corporate and personal computer networks and accounts. Authorities are increasingly worried that cybercriminals are trying to take over systems that control the inner workings of water, electrical, nuclear or other power plants.

That was the case with the Stuxnet computer worm, which targeted Iran's nuclear program in 2010, infecting laptops at the Bushehr nuclear power plant.

As much as 85 percent of America's critical infrastructure is owned and operated by private companies

The emerging proposal isn't sitting well with those who believe it gives Homeland Security too much power and those who think it's too watered down to achieve real security improvements.

One issue under debate is how the bill narrowly limits the industries that would be subject to regulation.

Summaries of the bill refer to companies with systems "whose disruption could result in the interruption of life-sustaining services, catastrophic economic damage or severe degradation of national security capabilities."it.

(Excerpt) Read more at centurylink.net ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government
KEYWORDS: dhs; hackers; homelandsecurity; security

1 posted on 02/05/2012 10:44:10 AM PST by Hunton Peck
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To: Hunton Peck

The government can’t protect it’s own systems from hacking.

What the hell do they think they’re going to do for these private companies?

It’s not about security or safety. It’s about power.


2 posted on 02/05/2012 10:49:02 AM PST by TheZMan (Obama is without a doubt the worst President ever elected to these United States)
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To: TheZMan

"It's OK; I'm in charge now!"

3 posted on 02/05/2012 10:58:25 AM PST by Hunton Peck (See my FR homepage for a list of businesses that support WI Gov. Scott Walker)
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To: TheZMan
It’s not about security or safety. It’s about power.

Exactly right. Just like the TSA at the airport -- You are not being kept safe; you are being kept under control.

The Left used to want to own the means of production (communism). Today, the Left merely wants to control the corporations (fascism). Having the government "protect" the IT resources of key corporations is all part of the plan.

4 posted on 02/05/2012 11:48:50 AM PST by ClearCase_guy (I am pro-Jesus, anti-abortion, pro-limited government, anti-GOP.)
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