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Congress Demands Drones Over America
AviationPros.com ^ | February 10, 2012 | Harley Geiger

Posted on 02/10/2012 8:42:52 PM PST by lbryce

Congress is demanding drones in the air over the United States - without considering the civil liberties issues. Within the span of three days last week, the House and then the Senate passed a law - H.R. 658 - requiring the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to speed up, within 90 days, its current licensing process for government use of drones domestically and to open the national airspace to drone aircraft for commercial and private use by October 2015. While the law requires the FAA to develop guidance on drone safety, the law says absolutely nothing about the privacy or transparency implications of filling the sky with flying robots.

As CDT and others have pointed out, drones are powerful surveillance devices capable of being outfitted with facial recognition cameras, license plate scanners, thermal imaging cameras, open WiFi sniffers, and other sensors. Drones' unique ability to hover hundreds or thousands of feet in the air - undetected, for many hours - enables constant, pervasive monitoring over a wide area. Without clear privacy rules, public and private use of drones can usher in an era of unparalleled physical surveillance. Without transparency requirements, citizens will not even have the basic right to know who owns the drone watching them from above. Congress, the FAA, industry bodies, and the American people all should play a role in ensuring that drones are used responsibly.

Congress missed a major opportunity to build civil liberties protections into H.R. 658. Instead, Congress fast-tracked the bill, ordering the FAA to unleash drones without even requesting a study or holding a hearing on the civil liberties implications of domestic drone deployment. Perhaps indignant hearings are inevitable, however, once hours of embarrassing drone footage hits YouTube.

(Excerpt) Read more at aviationpros.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: commercial; domesticdrones; dontspyonme; dontspyonmebro; donttreadonme; drones; dronescongress; dronesfaa; dronesus; govtabuse; hr658; robotics; technology
With the economy in dire need of ways to facilitate increased productivity, lower cost in a wholly new, innovative way, industry, the use of drones offers an opportunity to revolutionize an industry, in a process that has been a tradition as part of American business ingenuity.Of course, there are many problems, issues that need to be worked out, resolved, laws passed, before the drone industry, manufacturing, service -oriented,will ever become a viable component of the American economic landscape. But the fundamentals to have the US emerge as global leader is ours to exploit.
1 posted on 02/10/2012 8:43:02 PM PST by lbryce
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To: basil

ping for later reading


2 posted on 02/10/2012 8:48:19 PM PST by basil (It's time to rid the country of "gun free zones" aka "Killing Fields")
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To: lbryce

I’m just curious, how old are you?


3 posted on 02/10/2012 8:57:39 PM PST by Outlaw Woman (When does the shooting start?)
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To: Outlaw Woman

kind of wondered that myslef- reading that midless school boy drivel


4 posted on 02/10/2012 9:07:19 PM PST by Mr. K (Were the Soviet-Era propogandists as gleefully willing as our Lame-stream Media?)
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To: lbryce

Did you fall down?


5 posted on 02/10/2012 9:32:45 PM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: Mr. K
He likes those commas.......

The "Enemy of the State" concerns are a bit unfounded. There are already plenty of laws covering the uses of airborne cameras, FLIR, and electronic eavesdropping. We are actually on a good trend with the judiciary since the SCOTUS ruled against warrantless deployment of GPS trackers.

6 posted on 02/10/2012 9:41:02 PM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: lbryce

The Jap Arisaka 6.5 mm T-38 rear sight had fold down extensions on each side. It made the rifle an antiaircraft weapon, depending on which way the target was moving. -end- history lesson.


7 posted on 02/10/2012 9:41:56 PM PST by alpo
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To: lbryce

bttt


8 posted on 02/10/2012 10:30:33 PM PST by TEXOKIE (... and HAPPY VALENTINES DAY to all FREEPERS EVERYWHERE!)
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To: lbryce
Is this some sort of news? I've been spotting Drones for years. They have Obama stickers on their cars.
9 posted on 02/10/2012 10:32:24 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (Liberals, Useful Idiots Voting for Useless Idiots...)
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To: lbryce

Is there any reason non-drone aircraft can’t do this now?


10 posted on 02/10/2012 10:59:21 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (Sometimes progressives find their scripture in the penumbra of sacred bathroom stall writings (Tzar))
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To: USNBandit

Another quizzical problem for the Court. Is it OK to watch something on the ground robotically with the same resolution that, say, a human in a zeppelin would have with the naked eye?


11 posted on 02/10/2012 11:01:46 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck (Sometimes progressives find their scripture in the penumbra of sacred bathroom stall writings (Tzar))
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To: alpo

It was completely useless for that, though.


12 posted on 02/11/2012 12:26:12 AM PST by ltc8k6
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Well, these are a little scary...

http://www.mobilemag.com/2012/02/03/skynet-for-real-organized-swarm-of-nano-quadrocopters-video/


13 posted on 02/11/2012 12:27:31 AM PST by ltc8k6
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To: lbryce

They forgot to mention that it’s our civil right to be spied upon.


14 posted on 02/11/2012 1:23:43 AM PST by HarleyD
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To: lbryce

Are these drones bulletproof?


15 posted on 02/11/2012 1:40:19 AM PST by meyer (We will not sit down and shut up.)
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To: HarleyD

If the spy drones collecting data are owned operated by private companies, not the government, they are not violating the letter of the Constitution. The government can purchase information collected by private firms.

Consider the amount of personal data collected by private companies today. Also the pictures of private property on Google Earth and other websites, collected without the permission of the owners. Not to mention the private and publicly owned security cameras proliferating in public and private spaces. In our high technology world, privacy is becoming very rare.


16 posted on 02/11/2012 3:14:21 AM PST by Soul of the South (When times are tough the tough get going.)
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To: lbryce
But the fundamentals to have the US emerge as global leader is ours to exploit.

Yes - the same way our education system exploits and damages young minds...

17 posted on 02/11/2012 4:10:39 AM PST by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: lbryce

If it comes to this I would ask Iranians how to shoot them down.


18 posted on 02/11/2012 4:44:48 AM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: HiTech RedNeck
The resolution isn't going to be an issue. Zoom cameras are used all over the country by police and federal law enforcement. Airborne HiDef cameras can pick a specific person out of a crowd at around 2 miles.

You do bring up a really good point to ponder on the remote control aspect. The last SCOTUS case on GPS trackers said you had to have a warrant to place a tracker, but it seemed to be based on the invasion of privacy by placing a device on somebody's car. Most of the legal precedence on surveillance is related to the concept that what the police are viewing is in open view of the public. The question would be whether the courts view a UAS as enhancing a surveillance or relieving law enforcement of the work required to conduct the surveillance.

The driving force behind this bill isn't domestic work in the first place. The issue is that UAVs have been around for a decade and the FAA hasn't budged much on the restrictions for their use. DHS bought Predator B's for work on the border and have for the most part been locked on specific tracks. To deploy a UAS, even for a natural disaster requires a lot of work with the FAA. DHS wants greater access to the border areas and the ability to fly their unmanned aircraft to sites where they need them like a regular airplane. The FAA is a pain, but DHS jumped the gun by at least 7-10 years on UAS.

19 posted on 02/11/2012 10:24:06 AM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: kearnyirish2

You could build your own personal drone and add the necessary self-defense arms to engage in a dog fight with any pesky spy drones flying over you.

DIY Spy Drone

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/08/blackhat-drone/


20 posted on 02/11/2012 2:56:45 PM PST by KeyLargo
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To: KeyLargo

That’s great!


21 posted on 02/11/2012 4:21:41 PM PST by kearnyirish2
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