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How the US Shale Boom Will Change the World
OILPRICE.com ^ | 2/15/2011 | Gary Hunt

Posted on 02/16/2012 8:20:26 AM PST by Gritty

A funny thing is happening on the way to the clean energy future–reality is setting in. There is ‘incontrovertible evidence’ about the economic growth and job creating effects of America’s unconventional oil and gas production boom – more than 600,000 jobs directly attributable to shale gas development. Even President Obama is praising the job creating benefits of ‘America’s resource boom’. America is getting its energy mojo back and that is good news but not the entire story.

How Much Shale Gas is there in the United States? In July 2011 US EIA released a [Review of Emerging Resources: US Shale Gas and Shale Oil Plays produced by INTEK. This is an updated assessment of onshore lower 48 states technically recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources. The assessment found the lower 48 states have a total 750 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable shale gas resources with the largest portions in the Northeast (63%), Gulf Coast (13%), and Southwest regions (10%) respectively. The largest shale gas plays are the Marcellus (410.3 trillion cubic feet, 55 percent of the total), Haynesville (74.7 trillion cubic feet, 10 percent of the total), and Barnett (43.4 trillion cubic feet, 6 percent of the total).The INTEK assessment was incorporated into the Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule (OLOGSS) within the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) of NEMS to project oil and natural gas production for the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011) to provide a starting point for future work.

Total US recoverable natural gas resources (includes conventional, unconventional in lower 48, Alaska and offshore) totals 4.244 quadrillion cubic feet according to the Institute for Energy Research:

• Enough natural gas to meet US electricity demand for 575 years at current fuel demand for generation levels
• Enough natural gas to fuel homes heated by natural gas in the United States for 857 years
• More natural gas than Russia, Iran, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Turkmenistan combined.

The US has Three Times the Proven Reserves of Saudi Arabia in Shale Oil. Global oil shale resources exceed 10 trillion barrels. More than 1.8 trillion barrels of oil are trapped in shale in Federal lands in the western United States in the states of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, of which 800 billion is considered recoverable–three times the proven reserves of Saudi Arabia. The INTEK assessment for EIA found 23.9 billion barrels of technically recoverable shale oil resources in the onshore Lower 48 States. The Southern California Monterey/Santos play is the largest shale oil formation estimated to hold 15.4 billion barrels or 64 percent of the total shale oil resources followed by Bakken and Eagle Ford with approximately 3.6 billion barrels and 3.4 billion barrels of oil, respectively...

(snip: more at the Link)


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: drillheredrillnow; economy; energy; fracking; fracsand; naturalgas; oil; oilshale; shalegas
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1 posted on 02/16/2012 8:20:35 AM PST by Gritty
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To: Gritty
More current data is available, I wonder why OilPrice didnt use it?

More at:
http://www.eia.gov/energy_in_brief/about_shale_gas.cfm

2 posted on 02/16/2012 8:34:56 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Gritty
Here is Upstate New York, our utility bills are out of site. I believe the majority of us heat and cook and run our clothes dryers with gas.

But NYS has said "No Fracking" and without good reason.

The way I figure it, by the time NYS gets around to saying yes, the method will be so over regulated AND TAXED, that the consumers won't save a dime. What's new??

What's the real reason???....basic political arrogance"....just like Obama and his green or bust policies.

3 posted on 02/16/2012 8:35:07 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Gritty

and obama will spin it to his advantage, the republicans will waffle and the dems will destroy the industry. Its a sad time when you can’t easily rejoice for new industry in a country thats starving for it.


4 posted on 02/16/2012 8:36:53 AM PST by utherdoul
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To: Gritty

Most of this good news is moot if the envirowhackos continue to have their way.

Of course, if we end up with gasoline at $4.50-$5.00/gallon by election time, there’s no way that Obama and the Dims will avoid a crushing defeat. Maybe then we can actually open up more land for drilling and fracking, and also open up some offshore areas. There is no reason on Earth that the US cannot be completely self-sufficient in energy for several hundred years - save that of political idiocy, of which there is no shortage. Between the resources discussed in the subject article, and the several hundred years of coal reserves that we have - which contain enormous amounts of thorium that can be used in very safe LFTRs, part of the energy of which can be utilized to liquify the remaining coal - we are set. We are incredibly blessed...if only we’ll take advantage of these resources.


5 posted on 02/16/2012 8:38:13 AM PST by Ancesthntr (Bibi to Odumbo: Its not going to happen.)
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Cumulative natural gas production from 2010 through 2035 in the AEO2012 Reference case is 7 percent higher than in AEO2011, even though the estimated natural gas resource base is lower. This primarily reflects increased shale gas production resulting from the application of recent technological advances, as well as continued drilling in shale plays with high concentrations of natural gas liquids and crude oil, which have a higher value in energy equivalent terms than dry natural gas. Production levels for tight gas and coalbed methane exceed those in the AEO2011 Reference case through 2035, making significant contributions to the overall increase in production. Offshore natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico fluctuates between 2.0 and 2.8 trillion cubic feet per year as new large projects directed toward liquids development are started over time.

In the AEO2012 Reference case, the estimated unproved technically recoverable resource (TRR) of shale gas for the United States is 482 trillion cubic feet, substantially below the estimate of 827 trillion cubic feet in AEO2011. The decline largely reflects a decrease in the estimate for the Marcellus shale, from 410 trillion cubic feet to 141 trillion cubic feet. Both EIA and USGS have recently made significant revisions to their TRR estimates for the Marcellus shale. Drilling in the Marcellus accelerated rapidly in 2010 and 2011, so that there is far more information available today than a year ago. Indeed, the daily rate of Marcellus production doubled during 2011 alone. Using data though 2010, USGS updated its TRR estimate for the Marcellus to 84 trillion cubic feet, with a 90-percent confidence range from 43 to 144 trillion cubic feet—a substantial increase over the previous USGS estimate of 2 trillion cubic feet dating from 2002. For AEO2012, EIA uses more recent drilling and production data available through 2011 and excludes production experience from the pre-shale era (before 2008). EIA’s TRR estimate for the entire Northeast also includes TRR of 16 trillion cubic feet for the Utica shale, which underlies the Marcellus and is still relatively little explored. The complete AEO2012 publication will include a more in-depth examination of the factors that affect resource estimates.

In the AEO2012 Reference case, the United States becomes a net exporter of LNG starting in 2016 and an overall net exporter of natural gas in 2021. U.S. LNG exports are assumed to start with a capacity of 1.1 billion cubic feet per day in 2016 and increase by an additional 1.1 billion cubic feet per day in 2019. Over the projection period, cumulative net pipeline imports of natural gas from Canada and Mexico in the AEO2012 Reference case are less than 50 percent of those projected in the AEO2011 Reference case, with the United States becoming a net pipeline exporter of natural gas in 2025. In the AEO2012 Reference case, net pipeline imports from Canada fall by 62 percent over the projection period, and net pipeline exports to Mexico grow by 440 percent. Cumulative U.S. LNG imports from 2011 through 2035 are down by 20 percent in AEO2012 compared with AEO2011, due in part to increased use of LNG in markets outside North America, strong domestic production, and relatively low U.S. natural gas prices in comparison with other global markets. As in the AEO2011 Reference case, the Alaska natural gas pipeline is not constructed in the AEO2012 Reference case, because assumed high capital costs and low natural gas wellhead prices make it uneconomical to proceed with the pipeline project over the projection period.

http://www.eia.gov/forecasts/aeo/er/early_production.cfm


6 posted on 02/16/2012 8:40:54 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Gritty

“How the US Shale Boom Will Change the World”

It will provide full employment because 47% of the working age population in the US will be employed by the EPA shutting down energy production?


7 posted on 02/16/2012 8:41:34 AM PST by ModelBreaker
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To: utherdoul

We know everything Obama touches or supports turns to shit. I hope this is the exception. If we take advantage of our natural gas resources we can destroy the support for high priced oil. OPEC is a dead man walking.


8 posted on 02/16/2012 8:43:14 AM PST by meatloaf (Support House Bill 1380 to eliminate oil slavery.)
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To: thackney

One of my neighbors in KY drilled a couple of decades ago right under his yard. Cost him a few thousand. He and his immediate neighbors have been enjoying free natural gas ever since.


9 posted on 02/16/2012 8:44:08 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: cuban leaf

Good for them! I love to hear stories like that. NH is one of the few states with no coal or NG. But we have plenty of wood!
I am on the Science, Technology and Energy Committee of the NH House of Representatives. I have sent a link to the whole committee and others as well.


10 posted on 02/16/2012 8:49:00 AM PST by Past Your Eyes (I'm not cut out to suffer fools like this.)
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To: cuban leaf
"....One of my neighbors in KY drilled a couple of decades ago right under his yard. Cost him a few thousand. He and his immediate neighbors have been enjoying free natural gas ever since......"

This is interesting. Do you know how far down they had to drill? I assume you need a licensed and competent drilling company to drill, cap off, valve/pipe into your home, etc.

Also, if you presently have utility-supplied gas, I am wondering if one is able to drill and pipe into the house right alongside the utility, with a shut-off or isolation system. That way, if your well runs dry you can turn the utility back on.

Interesting....

11 posted on 02/16/2012 8:52:57 AM PST by Victor (If an expert says it can't be done, get another expert." -David Ben-Gurion, the first Prime Minister)
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To: Gritty

But of course nop company can get a permit to get to the stuff so what difference does it make? Unless of course you are suggesting likely locations of Chinese take over


12 posted on 02/16/2012 8:53:05 AM PST by Nifster
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To: Past Your Eyes

No oil either:

http://www.eia.gov/state/state-energy-profiles-data.cfm?sid=NH

Not many can claim such a dearth.


13 posted on 02/16/2012 8:54:50 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Nifster
But of course nop company can get a permit to get to the stuff

The amount of drilling into shale oil and gas fields has been growing for years. What are you talking about?

It is the reason we see such growth in production in several states, including oil in Texas and North Dakota. The same for Gas in Texas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania. Ohio is beginning to see good growth in both.

14 posted on 02/16/2012 9:01:43 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Gritty
• More natural gas than Russia, Iran, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Turkmenistan combined.

And more fart jokes per capita than any other nation on earth!

15 posted on 02/16/2012 9:10:59 AM PST by Albion Wilde ("The facts of life are Tory." -- Margaret Thatcher)
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To: Victor

—Interesting....—

Interesting is right. I was shocked when I was told about it. Apparently there is a lot of this sort of thing going on around here. But it is in pockets. Some places have it, others don’t. I don’t have many details about it though.

I don’t know who does it or what permits they need. I can tell you that I can build a house on my property with absolutely no building permit. It might be difficult to get a loan or resell though. :-)


16 posted on 02/16/2012 9:14:23 AM PST by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Sacajaweau

“Here is Upstate New York, our utility bills are out of site”

I just paid my heating oil bill to fill my tank in southern NH. It was $583. We pay PSNH $.155/killowatt for electricity.

Western NY(my mom still lives in near Buffalo)has some of the cheapest electricity and natural gas in the northeast.


17 posted on 02/16/2012 9:18:27 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: Sacajaweau
Here is Upstate New York, our utility bills are out of site.

Here in Western Pennsylvania, we are seeing an increasing number of cars and trucks with New York plates filling our hotel rooms near work sites.

What kind of people are you sending here?

18 posted on 02/16/2012 9:20:11 AM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Sacajaweau
Here is Upstate New York, our utility bills are out of site. I believe the majority of us heat and cook and run our clothes dryers with gas.

In W PA, four years ago natural gas was $ 15/MCF {thousand cubic feet} and since the frackers have been developing thousands of new wells, the rate is $4.35/MCF.

Our unemployment rate {excluding Pittsburgh and Philadelphia} is down to 6% with those two cities it's 7.4%.

Our electricity rates are up because the local power company has been forced to close six coal fired power plants.

The green weenies are trying their best to shut down the natural gas production, but too many people realize the benefits and so it's just the real crazies screaming and shouting about global warming, dirty water, dirty air and acid rain.

19 posted on 02/16/2012 9:32:32 AM PST by USS Alaska (Nuke the terrorists savages.)
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To: Sacajaweau

Our pellet stove is saving us a ton of money here in MA. It paid for itself in 2 years. You have to get a good one, like Harmony or Quadra-fire.

Negatives are minimal. Carrying 40 lb. bags, 1/2 hour/week maintenance, Exhaust pipe (chimney) cleaning 2-3 times/season, new $70 glow plug/season.

To avoid chimney cleaning, we side-vented, then you can clean the pipe with a long dryer brush in a couple of minutes.

Pros: Cheap heat. And we leave the thermostat at 75!


20 posted on 02/16/2012 9:40:01 AM PST by St_Thomas_Aquinas (Viva Christo Rey!)
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To: USS Alaska

So how much are you paying per KW ?


21 posted on 02/16/2012 9:41:46 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: USS Alaska

So how much are you paying per KW ?


22 posted on 02/16/2012 9:43:52 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: Ancesthntr
Of course, if we end up with gasoline at $4.50-$5.00/gallon by election time, there’s no way that Obama and the Dims will avoid a crushing defeat.

I'm hoping for $6 myself.

That would give the GOP a solid majority and a real chance to unwind the Ubama criminality.

23 posted on 02/16/2012 9:44:29 AM PST by Joe the Pimpernel (Should a constitution protect government from the individual, or the individual from government?)
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To: Gritty

bttt


24 posted on 02/16/2012 9:48:55 AM PST by steelyourfaith (Expel the Occupy White House squatters !!!)
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To: meatloaf

Obama is going to have a very difficult time shutting this down, despite his intentions. All of the Dems on a state and local level in the Northeast have already spent the additional revenue streams planned to come from this. Even Andrew Cuomo will be forced to come around eventually. If Washington Dems try and shut this down they will blow open a major chasm with state and local Democrat parties.


25 posted on 02/16/2012 9:49:11 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Sacajaweau
But NYS has said "No Fracking" and without good reason.

You should still begin to see some relief in your gas prices as NFG, RE&G, NYSEG, etc. buy their gas on the open market (that doesn't mean I'm content with New York's no-fracking stance.) In the rural areas, most of us heat with fuel oil and that's up 60¢/gallon over last year. The only thing saving us this year has been the unusually mild weather.

By next year this time, I hope zero's out of the WH and oil prices are headed down.

26 posted on 02/16/2012 9:52:12 AM PST by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment.)
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To: Gritty

Running cars on Natural Gas is something that has been around for a very long time. I saw it in Canada ca. 1990 and I’m sure it probably goes back way farther than that. I wonder why we’re wasting time and effort on stupid golf cart cars and just kick off an effort to fit (or retrofit) cars to run on NG?


27 posted on 02/16/2012 9:52:12 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: Gritty

Peak oil! OMG! Peak oil! We don’t have enough oil to last more than 20 years!

I’ve been hearing this since 1970 and it has only gotten much worse lately. Back in the 2008 manipulated oil bubble you heard it here every single day.

I’m going to bitch slap the next person who says we are running out of oil.


28 posted on 02/16/2012 10:12:23 AM PST by Freedom_Is_Not_Free (Priority 1: REPEAL OBAMACARE)
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To: thackney

And O just kicked Keystone Pipeline to the curb. Moreover this country has not built processing plants to increase capacity in ages. Now that fracking and other things are under fire count on this to suffer the same that coal has.

Do not kid yourself, with the dims in control they will drive us back to the stone age


29 posted on 02/16/2012 10:15:59 AM PST by Nifster
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To: woodbutcher1963

I hate to brag but here in Texas, I am paying 7.8 cents per kWh.


30 posted on 02/16/2012 10:15:59 AM PST by crusty old prospector
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To: Gritty
Which century was this written in? 1800s? 1900s? 2000s?

We've been hearing about how oil shale is going to supplant petroleum for almost 150 years now.

31 posted on 02/16/2012 10:16:59 AM PST by GSWarrior
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Running cars on Natural Gas is something that has been around for a very long time. I saw it in Canada ca. 1990 and I’m sure it probably goes back way farther than that. I wonder why we’re wasting time and effort on stupid golf cart cars and just kick off an effort to fit (or retrofit) cars to run on NG?

The answer's obvious: The eco-freaks don't want anything to do with vehicles that run on fossil fuels. Of course, they conveniently ignore that the electricity to recharge the expensive yet inefficient batteries* mostly comes from fossil fuel generating stations (coal or natural gas).

(* Eric Bolling of Fox News Business reported he was give a Chevy Volt to try out. It took 8 hours to charge the batteries and they crapped out in a Hudson River tunnel while on his way to work. His only praise was the smooth transition to gasoline power when the batteries died.)

32 posted on 02/16/2012 10:17:15 AM PST by CedarDave (Donna Brazile: "... we we believe that the weakest candidate ... [is] Mitt Romney.")
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To: Ancesthntr
Of course, if we end up with gasoline at $4.50-$5.00/gallon by election time,

Happy to pay that price if it means getting rid of Obama.

33 posted on 02/16/2012 10:19:23 AM PST by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten

http://www.kgoam810.com/Article.asp?id=2068523&spid=33179

Send an email to the White House at the following link: http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact
-or-
The White House Fax (most effective) is: 202-456-2461


Dr. Bill Wattenburg

billwattenburg2@yahoo.com

www.wattenburg.us

January 2, 2011

To: President Barack Obama

Subject: Easy way for you to drop gas prices to $2 a gallon for American workers. Otherwise, they will soon be paying for $5 gas -— and blaming your administration.

Mr. President:

Here is an all-win, no-lose, plan that will please the country and stop the blackmail from foreign oil suppliers. The outrage of $5 gas is coming soon - probably next year. It will wipe out the recovery and your administration in the next election. It must be stopped. Challenge the foreign oil suppliers with America’s most abundant and cleanest transportation fuel, NATURAL GAS. We can still use all the ethanol our farmers can make in dual-fuel cars. Conversion to natural gas cars sounds like a long and expensive transition. Not at all! You don’t need to force anyone. All you need to do is start the ball rolling. And there is a clever way to do that without any government subsidy, believe it or not! Nationally known and syndicated financial expert Bob Brinker came up with the deceptively simple, genius idea described below.

Mr. President, please sign a simple executive order tomorrow that says that all federal vehicles purchased after, say, January 1, 2012, must run on NATURAL GAS as well as other fuels such as gasoline, diesel, or ethanol. Such dual-fuel vehicles are already being used by smart companies all over the country. No new design or technology is needed. (Federal agencies can op out for a while if they have no easy natural gas supply.)

Why does this work? The federal government is the biggest purchaser of new vehicles. The automakers already supply tens of thousands of cars that run on natural gas or gasoline (or ethanol) for utility companies and taxis companies all over the country who gladly pay a higher price for these dual-fuel vehicles because their fuel costs are reduced. With the enormous federal government market for natural gas vehicles, car manufacturers will quickly make natural gas cars and light trucks available to everyone at no big price increase over conventional gasoline cars. Natural gas is available in almost all urban areas where most of the commuting is done. It is easy to fuel natural gas cars at home. But this initiative does not force any private citizen to buy natural gas/dual-fuel cars.

1. Natural gas is the only significant “alternative transportation fuel” that will be available over the ten to twenty years. And it is available everywhere, right now!

2. Dual-fuel natural gas+gasoline(or ethanol) cars will suddenly be available to the general public at no increased cost. Car makers now deliver them for utilities and Taxis.

3. The middle east oil countries know how much natural gas we have. They are terrified that we start using it and less of their oil. They will bring the price of gas down to $2 a gallon and keep it there to discourage our conversion.

This is a all-win, no-lose initiative for you. All you have to do is sign a piece of paper. Any agency that does not want to buy natural gas, dual-fuel vehicles can op out. But your executive order alone will cause foreign oil suppliers to think twice about blackmailing the U.S. for oil. It tells them where we are going — and that we will not need their oil in ten years or so.

The biggest worry for the foreign oil suppliers is that we will start using our enormous natural gas supplies, now estimated to supply the U.S. more than 100 years. The price of gasoline will drop to $2.00 per gallon or less – even before we convert large numbers of our vehicles to natural gas. American workers – and the economy — will applaud you.SIMPLY ANNOUNCING A REAL U.S. GOVERNMENT INITIATIVE TO USE NATURAL GAS FOR TRANSPORTATION FUEL WILL BRING THE PRICE OF CRUDE OIL DOWN BELOW $50 A BARREL.


34 posted on 02/16/2012 10:22:26 AM PST by Freedom_Is_Not_Free (Priority 1: REPEAL OBAMACARE)
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To: Nifster
Moreover this country has not built processing plants to increase capacity in ages.

I'm sorry but your are greatly misinformed. We are building and have been build natural gas processing plants like crazy. I've been on construction sites myself as well as several friends.

http://www.bing.com/news/search?q=new+natural+gas+processing+plants&qpvt=new+natural+gas+processing+plants&FORM=Z7FD

35 posted on 02/16/2012 10:27:09 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: crusty old prospector

My brother in central PA pays about $.05/KW because of all the coal fired plants around there.


36 posted on 02/16/2012 10:34:01 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: GSWarrior
We've been hearing about how oil shale is going to supplant petroleum for almost 150 years now.

I understand the language can be confusing as the media refers to oil from shale as shale oil. But this process is not about the old retorting shale to produce kerogen to create a synthetic crude.

This article is discussion producing oil that is already separated from the shale and can be produced with only drilling and pumping. What has changed is the ability to effectively use steerable horizontal drilling with hydraulic fracturing to open up the relatively narrow bands within the tight rock.

This isn't theory. It has been in production for years and has already produced significant increases in oil production.

We have a ways to go, but with this technology and a few states reasonable in the regulations, we have reversed the declining trend of the US oil production.


37 posted on 02/16/2012 10:37:12 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney
Are you describing the 'in-situ' process of extraction? It's kind of confusing.

Hope there is not another "Black Monday" in the offing.

38 posted on 02/16/2012 10:48:01 AM PST by GSWarrior
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To: GSWarrior
No, it is completely different.

In-situ is still a method of retorting shale, just doing it below ground, to release the kerogen to make synthetic crude with further processing.

Although frequently called shale oil, due to the shale being the source rock, plays like the Bakken, Eagle Ford and in the Permian Basin are producing actual crude oil that is already released from the shale.

39 posted on 02/16/2012 10:57:25 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: GSWarrior

Depending on how much detail you want, other sources of info:

https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/bakken/bakkenthree.asp

http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/eagleford/index.php


40 posted on 02/16/2012 11:01:32 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

Thanks. I grew in western Colorado so I am very interested the subject. Center for American West, although not a conservative group, has done a good job of documenting the history of oil shale in the Piceance Basin.


41 posted on 02/16/2012 11:06:07 AM PST by GSWarrior
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To: GSWarrior

If you really want to go in depth information about a formation like the Bakken, you can find stuff like this:

http://www.undeerc.org/Price/

But you may need some significant petroleum geology understand to get much from it.


42 posted on 02/16/2012 11:09:52 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

“The Southern California Monterey/Santos play is the largest shale oil formation estimated to hold 15.4 billion barrels or 64 percent of the total shale oil resources followed by Bakken and Eagle Ford with approximately 3.6 billion barrels and 3.4 billion barrels of oil, respectively... “

Thackney,
Has CA production also gone up recently ? According to this article they have 4X the available shale oil as either ND and So TX. Obviously, these two have become boom areas. Is the Ca shale oil in areas controlled by the state or federal govt ? Has CA passed some type of fracking moritorium like NY ? Enlighten us ,please.


43 posted on 02/16/2012 11:13:21 AM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: Sacajaweau
Environmentalists are sowing confusion on the subject at all levels. They prefer no action to employment and cheaper gas.

These upstate counties and small towns are economically dying and all the usual suspects want to do is spread hysteria to "protect the environment". These are the same people who economically destroyed the once world-class leather industry in this region in the name of a "cleaner" environment.

Hydrofracking concerns rise to the surface locally

44 posted on 02/16/2012 11:13:21 AM PST by Gritty (Communism has been replaced by an ambitious environmentalism-Czech President Vaclav Klaus)
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To: Gritty
My son lost his job of eight years on Labor Day weekend of 2011. On a whim, in October, he went to a job fair in a town about 30 miles away, filled out the application and added his resume and he was hired by a shale oil company on the spot.

There were 59 other men hired with him, but he and seven others were hired as foremen for the others. He is happy to be employed, and happy to get OT, but the best part is the benefit package. Even though he didn't technically go to work until January, his health and insurance packages were immediate. (I love a happy ending!)

45 posted on 02/16/2012 11:17:58 AM PST by Monkey Face (Stop repeat offenders. Don't re-elect them!)
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To: Gritty
My son lost his job of eight years on Labor Day weekend of 2011. On a whim, in October, he went to a job fair in a town about 30 miles away, filled out the application and added his resume and he was hired by a shale oil company on the spot.

There were 59 other men hired with him, but he and seven others were hired as foremen for the others. He is happy to be employed, and happy to get OT, but the best part is the benefit package. Even though he didn't technically go to work until January, his health and insurance packages were immediate. (I love a happy ending!)

46 posted on 02/16/2012 11:17:58 AM PST by Monkey Face (Stop repeat offenders. Don't re-elect them!)
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To: Gritty

When they came up with the insane idea of putting windmills in Lake Ontario, I went though the roof. We have a thruway that cuts across the State..from Albany to Buffalo with lands available all along the way. A windmill in an isolated Town makes sense...but cutting through a state?? We went through this with the canals...and then came the railroad. In fact, windmills are already proven to be inefficient and obsolete....and they kill birds...(like I care).


47 posted on 02/16/2012 11:22:52 AM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: thackney

We more than make up for it in many other ways. “;^)


48 posted on 02/16/2012 11:23:09 AM PST by Past Your Eyes (I'm not cut out to suffer fools like this.)
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To: GSWarrior
We've been hearing about how oil shale is going to supplant petroleum for almost 150 years now.

Damn, you're old! ;-)

49 posted on 02/16/2012 11:29:10 AM PST by houeto (Mitt Romney - A Whiter Shade of FAIL)
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To: Victor

“”....One of my neighbors in KY drilled a couple of decades ago right under his yard. Cost him a few thousand. He and his immediate neighbors have been enjoying free natural gas ever since......”

This is interesting. Do you know how far down they had to drill?”

In the far Western old suburbs of Cleveland, Ohio it was not uncommon around 1900 to have homes built with free natural gas obtained by the builder pounding an iron pipe a few tens of feet into the ground. This was often done between two houses so that both homes could share the output from one pipe. There are still remnants of these pipes in the ground that cause stories in the papers of natural gas leaks every decade or so. To the East of Cleveland about 25 miles, in Geauga County where the Utica and Marcellus shale deposits start, a not insignificant risk is running into a small pocket of natural gas while drilling a water well even only 50ft deep. The gas output was not much or economical (before fracking) and essentially requires the abandonment and capping of the well.


50 posted on 02/16/2012 11:36:55 AM PST by 4FreeSpeach
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