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The nice thing about ScienceDaily pressers is that they usually link the abstract, like this one at the terminal DOI, except sometimes they don't work.

Characterization of Circulating Endothelial Cells in Acute Myocardial Infarction

1 posted on 03/21/2012 8:00:30 PM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem

This is wonderful news! I hope they develop the test quicker than the researchers anticipate.


2 posted on 03/21/2012 8:25:15 PM PDT by bimboeruption (Clinging to my Bible and my HK.)
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To: neverdem

Note though that “Veridex” is the sponsor of the study, not that I know a darned thing about them, mind you.
Just pisses me off that all of science is corrupted by “studies” for which these companies pay.
I do know sh*t from shinola though.

I don’t believe anything anymore, I am the ultimate science cynic.


3 posted on 03/21/2012 8:25:36 PM PDT by acapesket
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To: neverdem

You want an easy test?

93% of heart attack patients have had a root canal. The bacteria found in their hearts is bacteria that normally lives in the mouth. When the person’s immune system gets older, less efficient, or compromised by another illness, and/or the person suffers a mouth injury bacteria from the mouth can travel fro, the mouth to the heart and cause infection there.


5 posted on 03/21/2012 10:37:57 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: neverdem
Vitamin K2 holds promise as an agent that reduces the calcification of arterial walls and subsequent rupture:

K2: Your Arteries’ Best Friend? Animal studies have shown that K2, but not K1, can inhibit the calcification of arterial plaque. As a recent review notes: “Calcification of the vessel walls is one of the features of atherosclerosis and is by itself considered to be a risk factor for plaque rupture.”38 And plaque rupture in a heart artery is often the final trigger for a (possibly fatal) myocardial infarction (heart attack). A 1996 study found that high-dose K2 inhibited the increase in aortic or kidney calcium induced by megadose synthetic vitamin D2. The authors noted that “a pharmacological dose of vitamin K2 might have a usefulness for the prevention and treatment of arteriosclerosis with calcification.”39 A 1999 study found that high-dose K2 could inhibit the increase in aortic calcium in rats made arteriosclerotic by high-dose D2 and an atherogenic diet.40 A 1997 rabbit study found that high dose K2 “prevents both the progression of atherosclerosis and the coagulative tendency by reducing the total-cholesterol, lipid peroxidation and factor X activity in plasma, and the ester cholesterol deposition in the aorta of hypercholersterolemic rabbits.”41 In 2003 Spronk and colleagues reported “that MK-4 [K2] and not K1 inhibits warfarin-induced arterial calcification.”42 Most importantly, a study published in 2001 examined more than 4,000 humans followed from 1990 to 1996. Subjects were examined for their dietary K2 intake. Those with a “high” K2 intake (greater than 33 mcg per day) had only 43 percent of the risk of suffering a heart attack compared to the low K2 group (less than 22 mcg per day). The risk of dying from a heart attack was only 37 percent as high in the high-K2 group compared to the low-K2 group. “The dietary intake of vitamin K1 showed no consistent relation with cardiac events or aortic atherosclerosis.”43

6 posted on 03/21/2012 10:45:30 PM PDT by Darnright ("I don't trust liberals, I trust conservatives." - Lucius Annaeus Seneca)
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