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German astronomers have discovered an ancient planetary system dating from 13 billion years ago
Balkans.com ^ | 3/30/2012 | Balkans.com

Posted on 03/30/2012 6:30:02 PM PDT by U-238

German astronomers have discovered an ancient planetary system thought to be a survivor of one of the earliest cosmic eras, from 13 billion years ago. The system consists of the star HIP 11952 and two planets. Such an old system will help shed light on planet formation in the early Universe, which occurred under conditions quite different from those of later planetary systems such as our own.

Accepted planetary theory states that, generally speaking, a star that contains more 'metals', (i.e. chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium) is more likely to have planets; it is also widely accepted that planets are formed in discs of gas and dust that swirl around young stars. The team noted with interest, then, that despite this observed trend for planets to form within clouds that contain heavier chemical elements, a star containing very little bar hydrogen and helium has two planets orbiting it.

HIP 11952, which belongs in the large northern constellation Cetus, is situated about 375 light years from Earth. By carrying out a planet survey into metal-lacking stars, German researchers identified two giant planets around this star. Although these planets are not particularly unusual in themselves, it is out of the ordinary that they should orbit such an old and metal-deficient star.

These findings, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, therefore throw up questions about what it actually takes to make a planet. If metal-rich stars are more likely to form planets, how were the two planets around star HIP 11952 formed?

In the beginning, the Universe contained almost no chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium. Nearly all the heavier elements were produced over time inside stars, before being flung into space as massive stars and ending their lives in giant explosions called supernovae.

(Excerpt) Read more at balkans.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: astronomy; astrophysics; cetus; hip11952; planet; science; star; stellarscience; xplanets

1 posted on 03/30/2012 6:30:11 PM PDT by U-238
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To: SunkenCiv; KevinDavis

Ping


2 posted on 03/30/2012 6:31:17 PM PDT by U-238
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To: SunkenCiv; KevinDavis

Ping


3 posted on 03/30/2012 6:31:29 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away.


4 posted on 03/30/2012 6:32:03 PM PDT by mkmensinger
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To: U-238
In the beginning, the Universe contained almost no chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium.

Yeah well, then there was humans and global warming.....

5 posted on 03/30/2012 6:33:04 PM PDT by EGPWS (Trust in God, question everyone else)
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To: mkmensinger

Well, maybe not so far far away, but it was a long time ago.


6 posted on 03/30/2012 6:33:52 PM PDT by mkmensinger
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To: mkmensinger

This planetary system is 376 light years away


7 posted on 03/30/2012 6:34:01 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

Star mining. Just don’t pig out and collapse that pig.


8 posted on 03/30/2012 6:34:45 PM PDT by bigheadfred (MY PET TAPEWORM (OBIWAN) IS AN INSANE MILITARY HATING LEFTIST)
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To: U-238

Galactically speaking, not all too far.


9 posted on 03/30/2012 6:38:15 PM PDT by wastedyears (Signature for sale.)
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To: U-238; martin_fierro; Charles Henrickson
Ich bin ein [13] Billioner
10 posted on 03/30/2012 6:43:19 PM PDT by mikrofon (Ich bin ein Tagliner)
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To: wastedyears; SunkenCiv

This star and its system had to be formed somewhere else.


11 posted on 03/30/2012 6:45:40 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

“one of the earliest cosmic eras, from 13 billion years ago”

assuming “time” passed at the same rate as at present*

(See Einstein on Relativity for a discussion of the relationships between time, gravity, and space)


12 posted on 03/30/2012 7:00:14 PM PDT by CondorFlight (I)
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To: U-238

You may think that if our solar system is 4.5 billion years old then a 13 billions years old planetary system should be millions of lights years away...but they are saying it is only 376 lights years away?...Hard to believe...


13 posted on 03/30/2012 7:06:33 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: jveritas

It says it was formed somewhere else and this galaxy picked it up.


14 posted on 03/30/2012 7:08:29 PM PDT by U-238
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To: wastedyears
Exactly and it seems not to make sense since our sun is 4.5 billions years old you would expect that a 13 billions years old system should be millions of lights years away not 376 light years...I am not astronomer nor an astrophysicist but I like to see some scientific and logical explanation for this...
15 posted on 03/30/2012 7:10:43 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: U-238

Yeah but that is a weak theory...


16 posted on 03/30/2012 7:11:56 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: jveritas

Rogue Planets are not unusal in astronomy.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-13416431
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/05/18/the-galaxy-may-swarm-with-billions-of-wandering-planets/


17 posted on 03/30/2012 7:14:10 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

Astronomy, the Science with a lot of BS... Not all of it but a huge part of it is just BS...


18 posted on 03/30/2012 7:17:41 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: jveritas

That is how you feel. I cannot argue with that.


19 posted on 03/30/2012 7:18:37 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

Not a feeling. I have a bachelor of science in Physics and a master in Mechanical engineering and I am just applying scientific logic and analysis here... A lot of so called theories in astronomy do not make sense...


20 posted on 03/30/2012 7:24:13 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: jveritas

Again, I cannot argue your views.


21 posted on 03/30/2012 7:25:46 PM PDT by U-238
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To: jveritas

“Astronomy, the Science with a lot of BS... Not all of it but a huge part of it is just BS...”
________________________________________

Well, it is not nearly as bad as all the Kook to Kookers (Coast to Coast AM) that are convinced that ET is zipping around all over Earth.


22 posted on 03/30/2012 7:28:58 PM PDT by AlexW
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To: U-238
A star containing very little bar hydrogen and helium...

OK, so how is hydrogen inside a bar different from ordinary hydrogen?

If this star is 375 light-years away, the light they are analyzing left the star about the time Harvard College was founded.

23 posted on 03/30/2012 7:39:59 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: AlexW
I listened to this show few times late nights on Saturdays... Yeah, there are a lot of crazy theories on this show... I think that the host George Noory of this show have appeared in multiple occasions on a History Channel program called "Ancient Aliens"... another lunatic show...
24 posted on 03/30/2012 7:45:11 PM PDT by jveritas (God bless our brave troops)
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To: jveritas
Hard to believe...

Yup, sounds impossible, that system should be on the edge of the visible universe if I'm thinking about it right.

25 posted on 03/30/2012 7:56:57 PM PDT by The Cajun (Palin, Free Republic, Mark Levin, Newt......Nuff said.)
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To: jveritas
You may think that if our solar system is 4.5 billion years old then a 13 billions years old planetary system should be millions of lights years away...but they are saying it is only 376 lights years away?...Hard to believe...

The article explains it is thought the star is a remnant of an ancient galaxy that collided with our own galazy billions of years ago.


26 posted on 03/30/2012 7:58:13 PM PDT by Iron Munro (If Repub's paid as much attention to Rush Limbaugh as the Dem's do, we wouldn't be in this mess)
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To: U-238

Wow!, Wow, and Wow!!

So, some planets are dense in metals, and others are not: 375 light years away; a Carl Sagan “billions of years ago.”

I guess that will make it very difficult for the super heads to explain Earth, a metallic planet: vs. with Jupitor or Neptune, gaseous planets. Here, in our own sun system. Who woulda thunk?

How much grant money is funneled to these folk???


27 posted on 03/30/2012 8:02:49 PM PDT by Noob1999 (Loose Lips, Sink Ships)
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To: Verginius Rufus

OK, so how is hydrogen inside a bar different from ordinary hydrogen?

They charge more for it...


28 posted on 03/30/2012 8:05:49 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: tet68

“OK, so how is hydrogen inside a bar different from ordinary hydrogen?”

‘They charge more for it...’

Not on ladies night...


29 posted on 03/30/2012 8:21:03 PM PDT by Bigh4u2 (Denial is the first requirement to be a liberal)
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To: U-238; KevinDavis; annie laurie; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Mmogamer; ..

Thanks U-238. Whereas I do want the say-so on adding the ping list keywords I meister, this is a good one!

 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

30 posted on 03/30/2012 8:23:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him)
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To: jveritas

I doubt there will be any.


31 posted on 03/30/2012 8:40:53 PM PDT by wastedyears (Signature for sale.)
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To: U-238

From what i have gathered in the past NOTHING 375 light years away can be 13 Billion years old.

13 Billion years ago this local space did not exist.


32 posted on 03/30/2012 9:16:55 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: U-238

“It says it was formed somewhere else and this galaxy picked it up.”

This star system wasn’t dragged 13 BILLION light years.

or maybe it was........


33 posted on 03/30/2012 9:23:16 PM PDT by mowowie
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To: Noob1999

Astronomers have shoestring bugets.. In 2005 NASA had a budget of $16.2 billion, this includes not only the human spaceflight division, but also other engineering projects, and science funded by NASA. The total federal spending budget in 2005 was on the order of $2 trillion ($2000 billion), making the NASA share 0.8% of the budget. By comparison roughly 19% of the budget was spent on the Military, 21% on Social Security and 8% went to paying interest on the national debt.

http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/question.php?number=684


34 posted on 03/30/2012 10:08:02 PM PDT by U-238
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To: mowowie; SunkenCiv

I was thinking more of a globular cluster where this star originated from and then ejected.Globular clusters are generally composed of hundreds of thousands of low-metal, old stars. The type of stars found in a globular cluster are similar to those in the bulge of a spiral galaxy but confined to a volume of only a few million cubic parsecs. They are free of gas and dust and it is presumed that all of the gas and dust was long ago turned into stars.


35 posted on 03/30/2012 10:12:17 PM PDT by U-238
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To: tet68
Two Atoms Walk Into A Bar

Two hydrogen atoms walk into a bar.
One says, “I've lost my electron.”
The other says, “Are you sure?”
The first replies, “Yes, I'm positive...”

In physics, a bar is equivalent to 10 newtons, per square centimeter.This is the pressure exerted by the Earth's atmosphere at sea level

36 posted on 03/30/2012 10:22:04 PM PDT by U-238
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To: U-238

37 posted on 03/30/2012 10:29:45 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: U-238

bflr


38 posted on 03/30/2012 10:34:22 PM PDT by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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