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Football Under Fire in Wake of Seau Death
Rush Limbaugh.com ^ | May 3, 2012 | Rush Limbaugh

Posted on 05/03/2012 1:34:22 PM PDT by Kaslin

BEGIN TRANSCRIPT

RUSH: Junior Seau. Junior Seau's suicide. I met Junior Seau just one time. It was one year at the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic Golf Tournament. Dean Spanos, the Chargers owner, was playing in the tournament and I was playing with Fuzzy Zoeller and his crew that year. And we all had dinner one night after that day's round. And Junior Seau was everything everybody is saying about him. He was uplifting, he was funny, he was in a great mood. He was kind of in my face humorously over politics.

He was a big believer in the government doing as much it could to help the poor and this kind of thing. He was just one of these people you like being around. So, now, how to explain the suicide? I have to tell you, I am amazed. Every channel I go to there's either a sports doctor or a psychiatrist or somebody explaining, "It has to have been all the concussions from playing in the NFL! It just had to be. There can't be any other reason." Well, I did hear one other reason, that he just couldn't adjust to not being in the spotlight, to not being on stage.

The football field's a huge stage and he was a big star. He just could not adjust to being a comparative nobody. He didn't leave a note so nobody knows. Here's Sanjay Gupta. He was on CNN so nobody heard it. That's why I want to play you this one. He was on Anderson Cooper 210 last night, which nobody saw. So I have to play the sound bite here for you. Anderson Cooper said, "Sanjay, several NFL players have committed suicide in recent years. Brain-related injuries they sustain while playing have been blamed.

"It's impossible to know what was going on in Junior Seau's mind at this point..." So, "impossible to know." It's impossible to know, but still: What was going on in his mind? It's impossible to know, Sanjay! We all know it's impossible to know, but is it possible? Even though it's impossible to know, "is it possible that past head traumas could have played a role in Seau's taking his own life?" It's "impossible to know what was going on in his mind," but nevertheless I want you to answer the question of why he did it.

GUPTA: We have enough evidence to say, "Yes," because you're starting to see, uh, a pattern of exactly what you're describing here, Anderson. This idea that the previous blows to the head -- uh, trauma, for example, sustained on a football field -- can accumulate over time and lead to something known as Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, CTE. Dave Duerson. You remember, you and I talked about him in 2011. He shot himself in the chest as well. It's a very unusual way -- uh, a rare way -- for one to commit suicide and just hard to talk about. But in Duerson's case he had left that note that Paul was sort of alluding to saying, "I shot myself in the chest. I'd like my brain to be studied." Duerson's brain was studied and in fact he did have exactly what he was concerned about: CTE. That was confirmed, you know, when they studied his brain.

RUSH: Now, Seau did not leave a note asking for his brain to be studied. Already doctors are asking for the brain of Seau to study it. But how many of you laughed at me when I told you some months ago that maybe not in our lifetimes (but it's gonna be close) somebody is seriously going to suggest banning the game of football. You can see we're heading in that direction. Now, every suicide is due to the game. "The game is killing people!" That's already been established here. So what's next, folks, with liberals in charge?

END TRANSCRIPT


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: football; limbaugh; seau
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1 posted on 05/03/2012 1:34:26 PM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

They’ll ban the kick-offs and punts soon enough...


2 posted on 05/03/2012 1:38:10 PM PDT by BuddaBudd (F U B O)
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To: Kaslin

For those that think banning football is the solution: Just how many people do you think would’ve heard of Junior Seau without football, what do you think he would’ve done instead, and do you have proof he wouldn’t have killed himself if he had been a bricklayer?


3 posted on 05/03/2012 1:38:19 PM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (Sworn to Defend The Constitution Against ALL Enemies, Foreign and Domestic. So Help Me GOD!)
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To: BuddaBudd

I would propose weight limits on players, you now have guys approaching 300 pounds who actually have speed....F=ma.


4 posted on 05/03/2012 1:39:48 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: Kaslin

And there are thousands of retired players who had concussions who are leading normal, happy lives. And there are thousands of people who never had concussions who commit suicide.


5 posted on 05/03/2012 1:42:14 PM PDT by ilovesarah2012
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To: Kaslin

Coming soon. The New NFL. National FLAG Football League. Complete with shorts and T-shirts with names and numbers on them.


6 posted on 05/03/2012 1:43:52 PM PDT by RetiredArmy (He has Risen!!! If you do not know Him, this is the perfect week to seek Him out!!!)
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To: Kaslin

Was watching espn this morning, and everyone has espoused one theory or another for Seau’s death. No one knows why he took his own life; please stop with the baseless conjecture. We may never know why he did it; it’s just a sad, tragic ending to a human life.


7 posted on 05/03/2012 1:44:41 PM PDT by Sic Parvis Magna
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To: Kaslin

That head-hunter coach should be banned for life instead of just suspended.


8 posted on 05/03/2012 1:45:55 PM PDT by ex-snook ("above all things, truth beareth away the victory")
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To: The Sons of Liberty

It’s not necessarily about banning it. But the league has screwed up. Right around Seau’s rookie season the NFL released a report that concussions cause no permanent damage, a report that was pretty silly given the medical knowledge we had at the time and has now been completely refuted. But during all the time players have been taking a beating, the league has only recently decided to take player health seriously, but of course they have decades of a violent culture they built to overcome. Then you get scary things like Chris Henry’s autopsy showing massive brain trauma and he was a wide receiver (probably the least impacted position on the team besides kicker) who had never missed a game due to head injury as a pro or college player. If Seau’s autopsy is similar something dramatic is going to have to change in the game, because if his brain looks like Henry’s then we’ve got good evidence that the game is beating players to death, probably starting with their first tackle in peewee.


9 posted on 05/03/2012 1:47:02 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: ilovesarah2012

I’ve had a couple concussions way back when and I never considered ending my life.
And what about hockey players? They get concussions and all other manner of beat up even worse than foolball players.


10 posted on 05/03/2012 1:47:59 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.)
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To: discostu
and he was a wide receiver (probably the least impacted position on the team besides kicker)

Huh?!?!? Tell that to Darryl Stingley (oh wait, you can't)

11 posted on 05/03/2012 1:48:49 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: Kaslin

If there is ever a concerted effort to ban American football, soccer should immediately connected with it, since it requires players to hit the ball with their HEAD. There are obvious symptoms of trauma from these repeated blows to the head, such as the belief that soccer is superior to football and the overwhelming tendency to vote Democrat.


12 posted on 05/03/2012 1:50:21 PM PDT by kosciusko51 (Enough of "Who is John Galt?" Who is Patrick Henry?)
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To: Past Your Eyes
And what about hockey players?

Hockey’s summer of tragedy turns debate towards whether to keep fighting in the game

13 posted on 05/03/2012 1:51:20 PM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: Mears

bfl


14 posted on 05/03/2012 1:52:57 PM PDT by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: discostu

Chris Henry’s autopsy showing massive brain trauma and he was a wide receiver...

Not to nitpick, but I believe Chris Henrey’s massive brain trauma was a result of flying out of the back of a speeding truck, which was being driven by a ex-girlfirend in an attempt to avoid a beating. Doubt that the coroner is able to distinguish between injuries sustained from playing footbal versus hitting the pavement after falling out of a moving truck...


15 posted on 05/03/2012 1:56:33 PM PDT by Common Sense 101 (Hey libs... If your theories fly in the face of reality, it's not reality that's wrong.)
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To: dfwgator

Receivers really do take less of a pounding than almost everybody. They’re generally only involved in 10 or 12 plays a game, probably only catch 2/3 of those, and frequently get to pop out of bounds without even getting tackled. When you actually look at their stat lines to see their level of involvement it’s amazing how much attention they get. Good blocking WRs like Hines Ward get more of course, but most WRs won’t block an artery. Yeah they’ll take a beating on a post route, but how many of those do they run in a game.


16 posted on 05/03/2012 1:58:03 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: discostu

Football is a brutal sport, especially in the NFL. The players know the risks going in, so they bear a large part of the responsibility. If Seau’s brain show massive trauma, as a linebacker you have to think the majority of it was inflicted by himself.


17 posted on 05/03/2012 2:00:10 PM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (Sworn to Defend The Constitution Against ALL Enemies, Foreign and Domestic. So Help Me GOD!)
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To: Common Sense 101

No, his brain trauma was long term damage, CTE damage.


18 posted on 05/03/2012 2:00:29 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: The Sons of Liberty

No they don’t know the risk going in. The league lied to them and told them there was no long term risk. That’s part of why they’re being sued, and they’re going to lose those suits. And when you look at the Henry situation with ZERO reported head injuries in college or the pros you have to start to think some of this damage is happening in high school or even peewee, when they’re kids and WAY know know the risk.


19 posted on 05/03/2012 2:04:49 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: ex-snook

“That head-hunter coach should be banned for life instead of just suspended.”

That being the case then all NFL coaches would have to be fired along with all of the players.

There are unspoken policies similar to the Saints on all teams in the NFL. The Saints were just unlucky enough to be caught.


20 posted on 05/03/2012 2:08:01 PM PDT by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise
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To: Past Your Eyes

Hockey players are killing themselves faster than football.

What it really seems to be boiling down to is CTEs, if you take enough concussive damage (which we’re learning might or might NOT be accompanies by a diagnosable concussion) you’re gonna get CTEs, severe permanent perpetuating brain damage. CTEs are generally going to leave you with severe brain rot (basically early onset Alzheimers), “Parkinson’s like symptoms” (Muhammad Ali), or severe depression. If you manage to not take enough damage to get CTEs you’ll be OK, but if you cross that line (which nobody is quite sure where it is) you’re doomed.


21 posted on 05/03/2012 2:09:51 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: discostu
Certainly, at this point they should know the risks. There has been a lot of publicity and the NFL ostensibly has lectured them on tackling with their shoulder, not the head, as well as the repercussions of blows to opponents heads, from penalties to fines to suspensions. They are, after all, individuals who attended college. I certainly do believe that head injuries are incurred at all levels of competition, from peewee on up.
22 posted on 05/03/2012 2:13:11 PM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (Sworn to Defend The Constitution Against ALL Enemies, Foreign and Domestic. So Help Me GOD!)
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To: The Sons of Liberty

Who’s talking about banning football?


23 posted on 05/03/2012 2:13:51 PM PDT by Trailerpark Badass
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To: ilovesarah2012

I don’t buy your claptrap. A good friend of mine, with two superbowl rings, played fullback for two different NFL teams. He knows me—he does not at all remember a very close friend of ours. My friend is in an NFL-University based program that is examening the effects of concussion on the lives of players. The results at this project are limited at the moment, but at least there is hope. I hear the great howls of how football players should be left alone to clobber one another, from FReepers who have never played the professional game. I haven’t either, but I have friends who have. Their stories about how a teammate came off the field, put on his civies, then couldn’t find the team bus or his family or car, are very frightening.


24 posted on 05/03/2012 2:19:56 PM PDT by righttackle44 (I may not be much, but I raised a United States Marine.)
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To: The Sons of Liberty

Understand that “at this point” covers really only the last 3 or 4 batches of rookies, a lot of the data on just how much concussion damage is permanent is fairly recent. And even last weekend’s drafties were all the way through high school and peewee football before the really scary data started coming out. There’s been some information for a long time, as we’ve known for a few decades that all damage to the body has some level of permanence to it. But the data saying you could be getting permanent brain damage without even getting a diagnosable concussion is just a couple of years old.

Which is the other side of how this is going to change football. Should any parent allow their kid to play peewee with the data we have now? I vote no. Of course if no kids are playing peewee, or high school, then who’s going to be playing college to become eligible for the draft? Hiding the data 20 years ago put the league in a bad spot, they should have been finding ways to minimize the damage rather than pretend it didn’t happen. Now they’re potentially in a position to be seeing the talent pool dramatically shrinking in a decade or so. Which goes a long way to explain all their efforts to get popular outside America, open up that 3rd world talent pool while they still have enough American players to fill the rosters.


25 posted on 05/03/2012 2:20:40 PM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: Kaslin
Football is a rough and dangerous sport. I should know - I signed up for it as a kid and lasted maybe a week or two before deciding it wasn't for me. And I'm no wimp, I would later spend four years in the U.S. Marine Corps. It was just that I had no desire to simulate getting run over by a truck 20-30 times a day.

Some people do like the contact however and thrive in the game. That's all well and good for them. If they make it to the professional level, they get lots of money and they earn every penny of it. Even if they don't make it to the pros, you can usually get a college scholarship out of it and they deserve that as well - especially considering the amount of $$$ those college football games bring to the schools.

That all said, there is a downside in that many players come out of the game with broken bodies and/or brain damage due to all the concussions. That is the risk you take to get a shot at the big bucks.

I'm not sure how you make the game safer for players without making it virtually unwatchable for everybody else. It would be like trying to make NASCAR safer by making the speed limit 45 mph and encasing the cars in bubble wrap. Who would want to watch that?

26 posted on 05/03/2012 2:21:15 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (I am 17 days away from outliving Phil Hartman)
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To: Kaslin

So how do they explain suicides of people who never played football or had no head injuries?


27 posted on 05/03/2012 2:30:17 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Kaslin
"He was a big believer in the government doing as much it could to help the poor and this kind of thing."

That proves he was brain damaged

28 posted on 05/03/2012 2:31:02 PM PDT by Mr. K (If Romney wins the primary, I am writing-in PALIN)
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To: SamAdams76

I think the biggest problem is that the padding is too good. You don’t have the same sort of injuries and concussions in Rugby (another rough and dangerous sport) primarily because they have less padding, and tackle differently. My guess is if you went back to leather helmets and shoulder pads, the concussion problem would go down dramatically after the first year it was implemented.


29 posted on 05/03/2012 2:33:58 PM PDT by kosciusko51 (Enough of "Who is John Galt?" Who is Patrick Henry?)
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To: discostu

The simple truth is that the human body wasn’t designed to take such a beating. Pro football has become what gladitorial games were in rome, a blood sport.
And remember our youth are now competing for an NFL position, making them very agressive.


30 posted on 05/03/2012 2:37:08 PM PDT by LevinFan
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To: righttackle44

I read an interesting article a couple of years ago in Sports Illustrated (I think) about how much more punishment a running back takes a couple of years into their career because they lose a half step (split second) in getting to the hole. In the NFL for running backs, time is not their friend.


31 posted on 05/03/2012 2:39:03 PM PDT by gov_bean_ counter (Sarah Palin: More miles per sound bite than the closest competitor...)
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To: kosciusko51

I know that they’ve found in racing that stiffer padding is better.


32 posted on 05/03/2012 2:39:58 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: SamAdams76

“encasing the cars in bubble wrap.”

Well, all cars are now designed to absorb and spread out the energy of a collision. Could a better helmut design help in the same way? I don’t watch football anymore, as I live in Cleveland. But I listen to Bob Golic on WNIR Talk Radio.


33 posted on 05/03/2012 2:44:11 PM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: cripplecreek

I understand what you are saying, but the racing/football comparison is a bit hard to make, since the helmets and protective gear in racing are there for accidents, not as a regular part of the game, as they are in football.


34 posted on 05/03/2012 2:44:40 PM PDT by kosciusko51 (Enough of "Who is John Galt?" Who is Patrick Henry?)
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To: cripplecreek

I think the hans device has helped. But simple physics shows that when you have forward momentum and stop suddenly, the jello like brain still moves forward. Look at Terry Bradshaw. He has problems with depression and is damn near retarded.


35 posted on 05/03/2012 3:11:09 PM PDT by goseminoles
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To: Kaslin

I have two theories: 1) He was murdered. 2)He was efeminate and hated that about himself. Both theories are plausible, knowing statisticaly 90% of the time a female suicide death occurs when a gun is fired through the heart. A man 90% of the time shoots himself in the head. Just an observation. The only other theory would be that he wanted to see himself conciously die, which is more creepy than any of us should like to entertain. He had a history of troubles with family. Fame can do some strange things to people, and his ending was horrific. I’d still be questioning that girlfriend intensely to see if there are any holes in her story-—sounds very fishy.


36 posted on 05/03/2012 3:12:07 PM PDT by Joshua Marcus
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To: Joshua Marcus

Uh... in developing your truly crackpot theories you forgot to notice another NFL player recently killed himself with a shot to the chest specifically to preserve his brain for study.


37 posted on 05/03/2012 3:24:24 PM PDT by newzjunkey (I advocate separation of school and sport)
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To: Kaslin
Nobody forces these players to continue playing. I always advise kids to give the game all they have and take it as far as they can but to hang up the cleats following the second serious injury.

If they make it to the pro's, target making the retirement mark and then hang up the cleats.

38 posted on 05/03/2012 3:36:21 PM PDT by fso301
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To: fso301

Maybe the NFL should work on banning steroids.


39 posted on 05/03/2012 4:25:06 PM PDT by Cap'n Crunch (Rush Limbaugh, the Winston Churchill of our time)
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To: Past Your Eyes
I suspect there's a lot more to the post-career ordeals of NFL players than anyone is willing to admit. As you say, hockey players get pretty banged up, too ... but from what I've seen, the life expectancy of a former NFL player is alarmingly low compared to the population at large.

In addition to the concussions, I wonder if steroid use and unhealthy training practices are to blame.

40 posted on 05/03/2012 4:56:04 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: discostu
You're actually contradicting yourself, DiscoStu. On the one hand you say that Chris Henry had signs of massive brain trauma caused by years of playing football, but on the other hand you point out that he had "no reported head injuries" in college or the NFL. If that's the evidence you're presenting, then it would seem to indicate that there is no relationship between head injuries and CTE. Otherwise, you're just speculating that his CTE was caused by mysterious head injuries that may never have taken place ... or at least never took place in a college or pro game.
41 posted on 05/03/2012 5:02:46 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: righttackle44
I've played hockey and gotten a couple of pretty serious dings over the years. None of them was serious enough to knock me out, but there's no question that many years of that can have an impact on you. I would expect hockey to be more of a problem than football in that regard, since hockey players travel much faster on skates than any human being can run.

Interestingly, I believe the effect of a "whiplash" injury may be more serious in terms of brain injury than an old-fashioned hit on the noggin.

42 posted on 05/03/2012 5:07:31 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
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To: Alberta's Child

I spent a year working in the woods. My logging career was cut short by a falling limb that knocked me silly and broke my back. About 5 years after that, I rejoined the military (National Guard - had been in the Marines earlier) and was in for 13 years. Never did go back to logging. Too dangerous.


43 posted on 05/03/2012 6:02:48 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (You knew the job was dangerous when you took it.)
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To: Cap'n Crunch
Maybe the NFL should work on banning steroids.

I don't think steroids have anything to do with it. Junior Seau played 20 years in the NFL. Even if he weighted 180 lbs, 20 years as a linebacker is going to take a toll.

44 posted on 05/03/2012 7:11:29 PM PDT by fso301
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To: cripplecreek
I venture to say there is more to this story than football. There a lot of speculation going on without much knowledge of the man's personal life.

The pro-football industry makes scads of money so they are an automatic target.

45 posted on 05/03/2012 9:24:02 PM PDT by oyez ( Yomomacare going done once, going down twice, going---..)
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To: dfwgator
is the suicide rate that extreme?...really, these aren't ordinary men, they've been coddled their whole lives...lots of money and prestige and I would imagine girls falling all over them....it must be shocking when their knees go bad, their backs are sore, and they need viagra just to keep "up".....ordinary men go thru these changes and take it in stride...but these sports figures don't know how to handle it...

if they want to make football safer however, they can start by absolutely enforcing a ban on steroids and hgh......

46 posted on 05/03/2012 10:51:39 PM PDT by cherry
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To: fso301

Well, I’m not so sure. Steroids certainly cause health problems (and are illegal, along with cheating). And, Mr. Seau did not leave a suicide note, so who knows why he did what he did. Why is it simply assumed that repeated concussions was the cause. Steroid use could have been a contributing factor as well.

If players are willing to assume the risks of injecting themselves with steroids so they can be in the NFL, all these factors need to be studied.


47 posted on 05/04/2012 3:47:20 AM PDT by Cap'n Crunch (Rush Limbaugh, the Winston Churchill of our time)
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To: Alberta's Child

It’s not a contradiction. It shows that you can sustain head injuries without concussion symptoms. That’s what makes the Chris Henry autopsy so scary. He never missed a game due to head injury but he CLEARLY sustained head injuries. CTEs don’t occur spontaneously, so there’s only two possible reasons Henry had them: injuries sustained before getting to college, which is really scary because that means he had permanent brain damage from peewee or high school football; or it was from injuries in college and pro ball that were to slight to be noticed (aka sub-concussions). There’s no way to view the Henry autopsy without fear. He either had his brain permanently damaged as a kid or as an adult in plays that didn’t appear to cause injury, either way you have to look at the current crop of players as walking wounded, we don’t know what percentage of this year’s crop of rookies already have permanent brain damage from football, but it’s looking like the number isn’t zero.


48 posted on 05/04/2012 8:32:17 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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To: discostu
Henry had them: injuries sustained before getting to college, which is really scary because that means he had permanent brain damage from peewee or high school football; or it was from injuries in college and pro ball that were to slight to be noticed (aka sub-concussions).

If true, that will kill the game......insurance premiums will skyrocket to the point where high schools will not be able to afford to pay them, so they'll wind up dropping football.

49 posted on 05/04/2012 8:34:11 AM PDT by dfwgator (Don't wake up in a roadside ditch. Get rid of Romney.)
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To: dfwgator

Since CTEs can’t be diagnosed until after death it probably won’t drive insurance up that high. But its all pretty scary.


50 posted on 05/04/2012 8:36:35 AM PDT by discostu (I did it 35 minutes ago)
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