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In the American west: An ocean of oil
Hot Air ^ | 7:31 pm on May 13, 2012 | Jazz Shaw

Posted on 05/13/2012 7:36:35 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

In case you missed it – and you very well might have, since the media was too busy talking about gay marriage to be bothered – a rather remarkable thing happened in Washington this week. An auditor from the GAO testified before the House Science Subcommittee on Energy and Environment on the subject of energy. But instead of hearing about how horrible things are, she calmly delivered something of a bombshell.

“The Green River Formation–an assemblage of over 1,000 feet of sedimentary rocks that lie beneath parts of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming–contains the world’s largest deposits of oil shale,”Anu K. Mittal, the GAO’s director of natural resources and environment said in written testimony submitted to the House Science Subcommittee on Energy and Environment.

“USGS estimates that the Green River Formation contains about 3 trillion barrels of oil, and about half of this may be recoverable, depending on available technology and economic conditions,” Mittal testified.

“The Rand Corporation, a nonprofit research organization, estimates that 30 to 60 percent of the oil shale in the Green River Formation can be recovered,” Mittal told the subcommittee. “At the midpoint of this estimate, almost half of the 3 trillion barrels of oil would be recoverable. This is an amount about equal to the entire world’s proven oil reserves.”

Read those last two sentences again and think about it for a moment. The largest remaining reserves of oil on the planet are not in Saudi Arabia or buried under the frozen steppes of the former Soviet Union. They’re here in the United States. Combined with the massive resources in western Canada, that means that North America is the King of Oil for the future. But what – if anything – will we do about it?

The vast majority of this supply is shale oil, a form which was essentially useless to us only a few decades ago, but now we know how to get it. And if you want to avoid ripping up the entire landscape, that means horizontal drilling and fracking. Unfortunately for us, this is one of those rare areas where the government actually can make a difference, for better or worse. The Obama administration continues to claim that they are pursuing an “all of the above” energy policy, but at the same time they are jumping in with new regulations regarding fracking.

If we move forward on this aggressively, the industry can safely access these resources which would significantly strengthen our hand on the international stage. But with the wrong approach, Washington could hog tie energy developers with excessive, expensive regulations or shut the entire process down by failing to issue permits to develop resources on these federal lands.

The public disclosure of these reserves is good news, but it’s only the beginning. And while I feel some trepidation in saying it, I’m afraid the ball is in Barack Obama’s court.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Front Page News; News/Current Events; US: Colorado; US: Utah
KEYWORDS: anwr; energy; keystonexl; opec
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 05/13/2012 7:36:46 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: TigerLikesRooster; landsbaum; Signalman; NormsRevenge; steelyourfaith; Lancey Howard; ...
We knew about the Oil Shale...how to get it is the issue....

And of course it has DIRTY OIL.

2 posted on 05/13/2012 7:39:10 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

The instant, that the progressive tools can take control of energy production, they will be pumpin’ oil like nobody’s business.

Guaranteed.


3 posted on 05/13/2012 7:41:07 PM PDT by 98ZJ USMC
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
"The largest remaining reserves of oil on the planet are not in Saudi Arabia or buried under the frozen steppes of the former Soviet Union. They’re here in the United States."

Again, Obama is caught lying to the public when he said, "we use a quarter of the world's oil, but only have 2% of the world's oil reserves".

4 posted on 05/13/2012 7:43:11 PM PDT by Baynative (Please check this out - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFIcZkEzc8I)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

A lot of ill informed if well meaning souls are screaming that fracking causes water pollution.

Fortunately it would seem rather easy to put that worry to rest. Tag the fracking liquid with short lived radioactive tracers, like the same kind of radioiodine used in medical procedures. Or some harmless chemical substance not found in nature. Then get samples of the water table water to check for the tracers’ presence. This doesn’t have to be done to every single well, just a randomized statistical sample of them. It ought to prove to be a definite non problem, with no water getting contaminated at all.


5 posted on 05/13/2012 7:43:15 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Mitt! You're going to have to try harder than that to be "severely conservative" my friend.)
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To: All
Previous thread :

GAO: Recoverable Oil in Colorado, Utah, Wyoming 'About Equal to Entire World’s Proven Reserves'

6 posted on 05/13/2012 7:43:48 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

We have an insane government that is self serving to its very core both one and all and I fear things are going to go from bad to worst. The country is looking more and more like Germany in 1935 and if something isn’t done the citizens of this Republic are going to pay a terrible price.


7 posted on 05/13/2012 7:48:31 PM PDT by mongo141 (Revolution ver 2.0, just a matter of when, not a matter of if!)
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To: mongo141

My terrible price came the day he was elected. No lie, that’s the week they laid us off at my ten-yr job.

unemp since, but going to school full-time on a pell grant, work part-time whenever I can find something.

Not used to being poor. But have always been conservative.


8 posted on 05/13/2012 7:53:55 PM PDT by bicyclerepair ( REPLACE D-W-S ! http://www.karenforcongress.com)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Not sure this is all what it is touted to be. I dont think fracking can get to this oil as it is locked into the rock in a semicoal like state. It will have to be extracted like the tar sands in Canada by cooking it out of the rock using huge amts of water and energy.

Much of it is on private land. If it was economically viable why hasnt it been done yet?


9 posted on 05/13/2012 7:55:11 PM PDT by Uncle Lonny
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To: HiTech RedNeck
Just posted this:

White House issues new hydraulic fracturing rule

10 posted on 05/13/2012 7:55:51 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

It doesn’t matter to the liberals what reserves we have.

We have to stop the rising of the oceans, and allow the planet to heal. As Obama might say..................

We have to use wind and solar and ocean waves and bio fuels and geo thermal. Anything but evil nuclear and evil fossil fuels.

Remember, the liberal view is that fossil fuels are evil. And, Obama is on record as saying Republicans want dirty air and dirty water.


11 posted on 05/13/2012 7:57:55 PM PDT by Dilbert San Diego
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To: Uncle Lonny
I think it is nearly all on public land.

And I thought the only way to get the oil was to cook it.

12 posted on 05/13/2012 8:00:08 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Q: How does One Know when Obama is LYING.

A: HIS LIPS ARE MOVING !!!


13 posted on 05/13/2012 8:01:02 PM PDT by chatham
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

“We knew about the Oil Shale...how to get it is the issue....”

Exactly this. At the present time, getting at the oil would mean strip mining most of the western half of Wyoming, as well as large sections of Colorado and Utah. I don’t think the public at large will go for that, let alone the populations of those states, no matter how many jobs it brings. And processing the shale to produce oil would take tremendous amounts of water in the already arid west. We make fun of the enviros on FR, but they have a point when it comes to Shale.

Technology will eventually exist that allows us to get to this oil. It doesn’t yet.


14 posted on 05/13/2012 8:01:17 PM PDT by balch3
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
That oil shale deposit is very old news. In fact Jimmy Carter sponsored a big recovery plant there back in the 1970s but the project fizzled for technological reasons. You're right: how to get it is the issue. Worse, 70% of the deposit is on federally-owned land and you can bet it will not be available for oil development.

Oil shale isn't oil sand, as in Canada, or the type of oil that can be recovered by fracking. It requires a heating process called retorting that takes several years for oil in a designated spot to be released from the rock in a form that can be recovered. It's electricity-intensive and the Greenies will have a field day opposing it. Unless we elect an administration that will kill off the EPA or at least get rid of the zealots that run it, shale oil is just a dream.

15 posted on 05/13/2012 8:10:57 PM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: balch3
At the present time, getting at the oil would mean strip mining most of the western half of Wyoming, as well as large sections of Colorado and Utah...

Technology will eventually exist that allows us to get to this oil. It doesn’t yet.

Apparently, that technology already exists.

As I recall, the current technology involves drilling 2,000 ft into the strata, heating the shale and "sweating" the kerogen out of it, then pumping the kerogen out. No need to "strip mine" the western half of Wyoming.

Which is, by the way, a pretty bleak area (speaking as one who once spent a summer in Wamsutter).

16 posted on 05/13/2012 8:13:05 PM PDT by okie01
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Soon to be a new national park while the only other large deposit is owned by the presidents main campaign contributor.

(or was that clinton?-lol)


17 posted on 05/13/2012 8:24:05 PM PDT by icwhatudo (This is not a choice between Romney&Reagan-Its between Romney & most radical leftist Pres in history)
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To: 98ZJ USMC
The instant, that the progressive tools can take control of energy production, they will be pumpin’ oil like nobody’s business.

Guaranteed.

Correct! They hate our military until it becomes their military. They hate our natural resources until it becomes theirs. They care emensely about the poor until they take power. Then they will happily murder millions of us to eliminate any possible opposition to them.

18 posted on 05/13/2012 8:33:56 PM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot
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To: okie01

“Bleak” Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Just because it’s not lush green as those areas east of the Missouri River, the vast vistas are beautiful in their own right.

By the way, the amount of water needed to get the shale oil out doesn’t readily exist unless you want to ship in really big chunks of Arctic ice!


19 posted on 05/13/2012 8:50:02 PM PDT by The FIGHTIN Illini (Beware of politicians saying they can fix anything)
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To: The FIGHTIN Illini
the vast vistas are beautiful in their own right.

Being from Oklahoma -- the home of miles and miles of nothing but miles and miles -- I quite agree.

But, I suspect, most would consider Western Wyoming "bleak".

20 posted on 05/13/2012 8:54:53 PM PDT by okie01
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
If those behind the curtain wanted America to become totally energy independent and diminish OPEC's power, someone would have a little phone conversation with the Kenyan or a off site visit with him, and lay down the new rule set.
Suddenly one would see a seismic shift in the current administration's attitude about oil and gas. They would suddenly become the prime sponsor for drill baby drill.
21 posted on 05/13/2012 9:01:24 PM PDT by Marine_Uncle
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I still think for crude oil, the amount still untouched is MUCH bigger than people think.

Don't forget, much of the continental shelf off the eastern and west coasts of the continental USA has yet to be touched by any oil rig--and geologists estimate there may be HUGE reserves of oil sitting there. And that's not including the continental shelves off the coasts of other continents, and the fact most of Siberia has yet to be explored for oil and natural gas reserves. And finally, developments in growing oil-laden algae on a huge scale could make it a base to make all known motor fuels.

In short, the whole idea of Peak Oil--which has been pronounced as far back as 1911--is total baloney.

22 posted on 05/13/2012 9:07:05 PM PDT by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I think it is nearly all on public land.

yep.

And I thought the only way to get the oil was to cook it.

Pretty much. It is locked in a near or at surface shale, too shallow to frac and with no overburden pressure to force it into a reservoir. Much of the Book Cliffs area has exposures of the Green River Shale.

As an aside, the US Govt. tried freeing the hydrocarbons a few decades back with a small nuclear device. That didn't produce the desired results. There was also a pilot project to cook the oil out of the mined shale at Parachute, CO, (UNOCAL, I think). It shud down in the '80s when the price of oil crashed, and would likely be EPA'd out of existence today.

23 posted on 05/13/2012 9:14:48 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Reading the actual report, there are ‘challenges’

“Uncertainty about viable technologies. A significant challenge to the development of oil shale lies in the uncertainty surrounding the viability of current technologies to economically extract oil from oil shale.

To extract the oil, the rock needs to be heated to very high temperatures—ranging from about 650 to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit — in a process known as retorting. Retorting can be accomplished primarily by two methods. One method involves mining the oil shale, bringing it to the surface, and heating it in a vessel known as a retort.

Mining oil shale and retorting it has been demonstrated in the United States and is currently done to a limited extent in Estonia, China, and Brazil. However, a commercial mining operation with surface retorts has never been developed in the United States because the oil it produces competes directly with conventional crude oil, which historically has been less expensive to produce.

The other method, known as an in-situ process, involves drilling holes into the oil shale, inserting heaters to heat the rock, and then collecting the oil as it is freed from the rock. Some in-situ technologies have been demonstrated on very small scales, but other technologies have yet to be proven, and none has been shown to be economically or environmentally viable at a commercial scale. According to some energy experts, the key to developing our country’s oil shale is the development of an in-situ process because most of the richest oil shale is buried beneath hundreds to thousands of feet of rock, making mining difficult or impossible.

In addition to these uncertainties, transporting the oil produced from oil shale to refineries may pose challenges because pipelines and major highways are not prolific in
the remote areas where the oil shale is located, and the large-scale”


24 posted on 05/13/2012 9:53:23 PM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
North America is the King of Oil for the future. But what – if anything – will we do about it?

Nothing, until we get a Republican President and a reasonably conservative to moderate Congress.

25 posted on 05/13/2012 9:53:23 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: RayChuang88

Peak oil is not about the amount of oil as much as it is about the cost of procuring it. There will always be oil, but many will be priced on of access to it and it’s products .... unlike the boom years.


26 posted on 05/13/2012 10:00:50 PM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: SuziQ
News like this is the "non-Secret" of this century. For example, North Dakota's unemployment rate is something around 3%!!!

Obama? No. It's the new technology of fracking and the boom of new energy found on private lands.

Remove Obama, and the liberals in Congress, and we could potentially be a net exporter by 2040, or sooner.

27 posted on 05/13/2012 10:02:41 PM PDT by CT
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To: Smokin' Joe

Reading the actual report, the oil is buried very deep, not at the surface.


28 posted on 05/13/2012 10:03:50 PM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Actual report here:
http://science.house.gov/sites/republicans.science.house.gov/files/documents/hearings/HHRG-112-%20SY20-WState-AMittal-20120510.pdf


29 posted on 05/13/2012 10:05:30 PM PDT by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: thackney

Ping.


30 posted on 05/13/2012 10:12:19 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four Fried Chickens and a Coke)
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To: All

Sarah Palin for Energy Secretary in a Romney administration.


31 posted on 05/13/2012 10:21:00 PM PDT by Walvoord
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Not only is it dirty oil and difficult to harvest, the whole Range is occupied by bipartisan NIMBYs, who control the business and politics of this nation. IMO, go for it, but the elite folks aren't going to allow it. For example, efforts of at least some uranium companies to test drill in some of the most sparsely populated counties in Colorado over the past few years have been stopped. Same goes for at least some natural gas companies.


32 posted on 05/13/2012 10:25:32 PM PDT by familyop ("Wanna cigarette? You're never too young to start." --Deacon, "Waterworld")
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

bflr


33 posted on 05/13/2012 10:33:58 PM PDT by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: familyop
the whole Range is occupied by bipartisan NIMBYs, who control the business and politics of this nation.

Where were these "bipartisan NIMBYs" when the Powder River Basin became the world's largest strip mine?

34 posted on 05/13/2012 10:40:54 PM PDT by okie01
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

The actual good news is here:

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/oil-rig-workers-nearly-100-140600665.html


35 posted on 05/13/2012 10:53:58 PM PDT by SVTCobra03 (You can never have enough friends, horsepower or ammunition.)
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To: Lorianne

I saw a guy on TV once who had this medium sized box, like a breadbox, with a spigot on it.

He put a rock in the box, a beaker under the spigot, and turned it on - a few minutes later, the beaker was half filled with fairly clean oil.

It was a modded microwave - it literally boils the oil out of the rocks without actually heating the shale.


36 posted on 05/13/2012 10:55:59 PM PDT by djf ("There are more old drunkards than old doctors." - Benjamin Franklin)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

It is not really crude oil, but a substance that can be converted to oil called kerogen. The cost in both money and energy are excessive as I discussed in this thread yesterday.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2882771/posts

Many confuse it with the shale oil being produced in North Dakota and Montana. They are not even close to being the same.


37 posted on 05/13/2012 11:03:16 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Up to one half or more of it is presently recoverable using horizontal drilling and fracking technology. But one problem, almost all of it lies under federal land. IMO, we can kiss it off, for no way will the *^%$#&@! asshats in congress and this administration allow it to be developed.


38 posted on 05/13/2012 11:08:46 PM PDT by Sea Parrot (I'll be a nice to you as you'll let me be, or as mean as you make me be.)
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To: Sea Parrot

Horizontal drilling and fracking will not work for the Green River formation.
From the report:

“• Uncertainty about viable technologies. A significant challenge to the development of oil shale lies in the uncertainty surrounding the viability of current technologies to economically extract oil from oil shale. To extract the oil, the rock needs to be heated to very high temperatures—ranging from about 650 to 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit— in a process known as retorting. Retorting can be accomplished primarily by two methods. One method involves mining the oil shale, bringing it to the surface, and heating it in a vessel known as a retort. Mining oil shale and retorting it has been demonstrated in the United States and is currently done to a limited extent in Estonia, China, and Brazil. However, a commercial mining operation with surface retorts has never been developed in the United States because the oil it produces competes directly with conventional crude oil, which historically has been less expensive to produce. The other method, known as an in-situ process, involves drilling holes into the oil shale, inserting heaters to heat the rock, and then collecting the oil as it is freed from the rock. Some in-situ technologies have been demonstrated on very small scales, but other technologies have yet to be proven, and none has been shown to be economically or environmentally viable at a commercial scale. According to some energy experts, the key to developing our country’s oil shale is the development of an in-situ process because most of the richest oil shale is buried beneath hundreds to thousands of feet of rock, making mining difficult or impossible. In addition to these uncertainties, transporting the oil produced from oil shale to refineries may pose challenges because pipelines and major highways are not prolific in the remote areas where the oil shale is located, and the large-scale infrastructure that would be needed to supply power to heat the oil shale is lacking.”


39 posted on 05/13/2012 11:18:41 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Sea Parrot

Yep, they are invested in solar panels and wind turbines.


40 posted on 05/13/2012 11:20:18 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (The Global Warming Hoax was a Criminal Act....where is Al Gore?)
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To: Bernard Marx
“That oil shale deposit is very old news. In fact Jimmy Carter sponsored a big recovery plant there back in the 1970s but the project fizzled for technological reasons.”

It did not fail for that reason, it was strictly economics. The Parachute CO project was going full blast ahead when oil was around $40.00 a bbl. IMO the project scared the living hell out of OPEC, the price of oil dropped to around $9.00 bbl. Blam and damn, oil shale was no longer profitably viable, end of story.

41 posted on 05/13/2012 11:44:21 PM PDT by Sea Parrot (I'll be a nice to you as you'll let me be, or as mean as you make me be.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Shell always said it was commercial if the price of oil got above $50 a barrel. When it went well above that, Shell started tooling up to expand their pilot operation. Thats when the government shut them down.

If there is no way for it to be commercial, then no need for the government to shut them down.

In Utah a consortium of investors were developing an operation on private land, and the government shut that down too.

The politician who took charge of shutting it down was O’s pick to head up the Department of the Interior. So thats where that stands.

There are other countries going after their oil shale, Brazil, Argentina, Jordan signed a $20 billion dollar contract with Shell to develop theirs. For what its worth, Estonia generates 100% of its electricity burning oil shale like coal. The waste goes on their road beds.


42 posted on 05/13/2012 11:49:17 PM PDT by marron
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To: Okieshooter

The problem is that it has to be commercially viable, that is it has to compete with the price of oil from other sources. If it costs $200 per barrel to produce and the current oil price is $100 you can only lose money by doing it becuse no one will be standing in line to buy your $200 oil.

I am in the oil business and I know plenty of places that I could go drill a well, be it a very low volume, and produce it at a $200 per barrel cost, but I am sane.

Maybe someday when all the oil from other sources is gone it will work.


43 posted on 05/13/2012 11:51:57 PM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: marron

“Shell always said it was commercial if the price of oil got above $50 a barrel”

Historically because the price of energy and other costs have gone up with the price of oil the costs to produce kerogen have gone up with it so it is a moving target. I don’t know what the current cost would be, but I am quite sure it is way above $50.

As one well known geologist once said, “ oil shale is the oil of the future and aways will be. “


44 posted on 05/14/2012 12:03:14 AM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Okieshooter

It was only a couple of years ago. The price was above $75 or $80 at the time.

I agree with your remark that the $50 is a moving target. But, again, if it can never be commercially viable, no need to shut it down legally. I notice driving through the area a lot of drilling rigs. I assume they are exploring, to nail down exactly where the deposits are. In the current political climate, its a dead issue. But someone is doing a lot of exploring.


45 posted on 05/14/2012 12:08:25 AM PDT by marron
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To: okie01

Ah, Wamsutter, WY, land of the Red Desert and Continental Divide. I spent six years (1980-86) there as a Marathon Oil Co supervisor, before getting transferred to Bakersfield, CA.

There were more murders in the tiny town during that six years than I can recall. When I first got there, all the pumpers were carrying weapons in the company vehicles, which I decided to stop. Within just a few weeks, I ate crow and told the pumpers they could get their guns back in the co. trucks.

Sweetwater County sheriff’s dept. told me that stretch of I-80 was the most dangerous piece of highway in the nation, said the prairie around there was full of unmarked graves. In winter when the lease roads would often drift shut, one pumper would take a ridge route to reach some wells. He remarked one day that he had hit a bump he never had before, spring revealed he had been driving over a body for most of the winter. The sheep herder who found the body was Basque and spoke no English, he was half insane trying to describe what he had found.

Happiness for me was seeing Wamsutter in the rear view mirror the day got transferred.


46 posted on 05/14/2012 12:12:23 AM PDT by Sea Parrot (I'll be a nice to you as you'll let me be, or as mean as you make me be.)
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To: Lorianne

The shale oil there is actually kerogen sediment. (does kerosene link ring a bell?)

Kerosene was first retorted from kerogen in the mid 1800’s from deposits in New Brusnwick, Ontario and Nova Scotia.


47 posted on 05/14/2012 12:23:37 AM PDT by Sea Parrot (I'll be a nice to you as you'll let me be, or as mean as you make me be.)
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To: marron

There are other conventional oil and gas producing formations in the area and that is probably the explaination for most of the drilling activity you are seeing although some may be wells just to tie down the exact dimensions of the Green River Formation.

I am not familiar with the geology of the area, but as in all oil producing areas there are layers of different types of sedimentary rock on top of each other, some containing commercial quanities of oil and gas and some not. The Green River formation is just one of the layers.


48 posted on 05/14/2012 12:37:56 AM PDT by Okieshooter
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To: Okieshooter
“According to some
energy experts, the key to developing our country’s oil shale is the
development of an in-situ process because most of the richest oil
shale is buried beneath hundreds to “thousands” (emphasis mine) of feet of rock, making
mining difficult or impossible.”

And the key word is “thousands.” Kerogen in nature converts to oil under sufficient pressure and temperature. There is a temperature gradient as depth increases, using present horizontal drilling and fracking technology shale oil is now being produced around the world.

If in-situ heat was introduced at depths where the richest deposits are located and temperatures are already moderately high. It would not take that much to artificially tip the scales and create the process.

49 posted on 05/14/2012 12:52:11 AM PDT by Sea Parrot (I'll be a nice to you as you'll let me be, or as mean as you make me be.)
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To: balch3

At the present time, getting at the oil would mean strip mining most of the western half of Wyoming, as well as large sections of Colorado and Utah.
...............
No strip mining needed. Oil bearing rock is first melted underground to make it liquid and then piped to the surface.The process of doing this is called insitu. Its also relatively cheap.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_shale

In 2005, Royal Dutch Shell announced that its in-situ process could become competitive for oil prices over $30 per barrel ($190/m3).[56] A 2004 report by the United States Department of Energy stated that both the Shell technology and technology used in the Stuart Oil Shale Project could be competitive at prices above $25 per barrel, and that the Viru Keemia Grupp expected full-scale production to be economical at prices above $18 per barrel ($130/m3).[46][57]


50 posted on 05/14/2012 12:53:01 AM PDT by ckilmer
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