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Girl, 6, Is Youngest Ever in National Spelling Bee
ABCNews ^ | May 28, 2012 | JOSEPH WHITE

Posted on 05/28/2012 9:17:40 AM PDT by Steelfish

Girl, 6, Is Youngest Ever in National Spelling Bee

JOSEPH WHITE May 28, 2012

The youngest person ever to qualify for the National Spelling Bee was running around in a stream with a friend, hunting for rocks. Suddenly, she came charging up the bank and headed straight for her mother.

"Hold on to that basalt," Lori Anne Madison said in a bossy 6-year-old's voice, "and do not drop it."

"Go away," her mother, Sorina Madison, said playfully.

She talks at 100 mph. In the last few weeks, she has won major awards in both swimming and math, but one accomplishment above all has made her an overnight national celebrity: This week, the precocious girl from Lake Ridge, Va., will be onstage with youngsters more than twice her age and twice her size as one of 278 spellers who have qualified for the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

"She's like a teenager in a 6-year-old body," Sorina said. "Her brain, she understands things way ahead of her age."

It's hard to argue with that, especially after spending a couple of hours with Lori Anne and her friends as they splashed in the waters on a sunny day at the Scotts Run Nature Preserve in the suburbs of Washington, D.C.

There's been no need for Lori Anne's parents to push her to do anything — because she's already way out in front dragging them along. Some kids are ahead of the curve physically, mentally or socially from a very young age. Lori Anne is the rare exception who defies the norms in every category.

She hit all her milestones early, walking and talking well before others in her play group. She was reading before she was 2.

(Excerpt) Read more at abcnews.go.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: homeschooling

1 posted on 05/28/2012 9:17:45 AM PDT by Steelfish
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To: Steelfish

When I was in elementary school, only middle schoolers were eligible to go.


2 posted on 05/28/2012 9:19:00 AM PDT by scrabblehack
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To: Steelfish

I bet she can spell better than Obama.

“C-O-R-P-S-M-A-N”


3 posted on 05/28/2012 9:25:15 AM PDT by OrangeHoof (Our economy won't heal until one particular black man is unemployed.)
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To: Steelfish

4 posted on 05/28/2012 9:25:37 AM PDT by Zakeet (Obama loves to wok dogs)
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To: Steelfish

Just wait until the hormones kick in and she’ll suddenly forget everything. My younger sister was a whiz until she discovered boys.


5 posted on 05/28/2012 9:28:07 AM PDT by OrangeHoof (Our economy won't heal until one particular black man is unemployed.)
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To: OrangeHoof

How about S-Y-C-A-C-U-S-E? Some idiot kenyan needs to stay at the Holiday Inn Express..


6 posted on 05/28/2012 9:30:20 AM PDT by max americana
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To: Steelfish

Cool. But I hope her intellectual preciousness eventually comes to something more substantial than facility with navigating the irrationality of English orthography.

The fact we English speakers have to spend any brain-power on spelling is the unfortunate result of having frozen our spelling too early. I would be perfectly easy to have completely rational spelling for English the way Russian and Korean have scripts which exactly encode the pronunciation, but no! We had to follow Samuel Johnson and pin down our spelling with remnants of the history of languages and irrationalities like the decision to transliterate the Greek phi as ph, rather than f, frozen in. In the days of Shakespeare and the King James translators there was not a fixed system for spelling English, and they managed to produce the finest prose (and blank verse) the language has ever produced. (Did not fretting about spelling help?)


7 posted on 05/28/2012 9:31:40 AM PDT by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: OrangeHoof

I bet she can spell better than Obama. ... “C-O-R-P-S-M-A-N”

You can't lay that one off on the Head Idiot ... cause as we all know, it's two words ... C-O-R-P-S-E ... M-A-N!

8 posted on 05/28/2012 9:37:31 AM PDT by Zakeet (Obama loves to wok dogs)
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To: The_Reader_David
Cool. But I hope her intellectual preciousness eventually comes to something more substantial than facility with navigating the irrationality of English orthography.


S-E-E-M-Z T-A M-E D-A-T Y-O-U B-E H-A-T-I-N


C-U-Z Y-O-U B-E J-E-A-L-U-Z
9 posted on 05/28/2012 9:53:17 AM PDT by golux
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To: Steelfish

Two Words -—> Rebecca Sealfon


10 posted on 05/28/2012 10:06:57 AM PDT by Amagi (I challenge Barack Obama to call this Tea Party Patriot a "tea bagger" to my face.)
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To: Steelfish

Highly gifted kids are the hardest to raise! Argh! She sounds like a cutie but it’s not always a “gift.”


11 posted on 05/28/2012 10:21:55 AM PDT by Yaelle
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To: Steelfish

I loved the part about the private school said she was too bright to attend and needed to be homeschooled.


12 posted on 05/28/2012 10:29:26 AM PDT by Tailback
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To: Tailback

But .. but, she’ll need to be properly “socialized”*


13 posted on 05/28/2012 10:45:46 AM PDT by mikrofon (* In the Leftist sense...)
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To: Steelfish

Spelling Bee’s as far as I know, are a uniquely English-language phenomena. So illogical and unphonetic is our language—due to its pigeon/bastard origins—that it takes a tremendous amount of raw memorization—which teens and younger excel at—just to spell in a basic literate sense.

Spelling Bees are NOT needed in more logical, phonetic languages like German, French, Spanish, Italian etc.

It’s strange how we’ve turned the worst part of our language—its illogical, rule-less nature in spelling—into a competition and mark of pride for kids.

I wonder what our kids could do if they didn’t have to worry about spending a lot of time memorizing spelling, just to attain basic literacy?


14 posted on 05/28/2012 11:20:08 AM PDT by AnalogReigns (because REALITY is never digital...)
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To: AnalogReigns

Well, based upon what is running our public education system, the additional time would be spent teaching the kids about ‘fisting’ and other degenerate practices theprogressives deem ‘worthy for indoctrination’.


15 posted on 05/28/2012 11:31:40 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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Click the link.
The Republic you save may be your own.


16 posted on 05/28/2012 12:09:16 PM PDT by RedMDer (https://support.woundedwarriorproject.org/default.aspx?tsid=93)
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To: MHGinTN

Keep this little kid as far away from public school as possible!


17 posted on 05/28/2012 12:23:44 PM PDT by stephenjohnbanker (God, family, country, mom, apple pie, the girl next door and a Ford F250 to pull my boat.)
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To: The_Reader_David
The fact we English speakers have to spend any brain-power on spelling is the unfortunate result of having frozen our spelling too early.

Yes, it is complex -- but it's eminently teachable. We have 44 sounds that we have to stuff into 26 letters. It's tough, but the result is the most flexible and most widely-used language on Earth.

And, trust me, the French and the vaunted, "perfectly-phonetic" Spanish-speakers misspell their languages all the time. It's all about the education.

18 posted on 05/28/2012 3:30:02 PM PDT by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment.)
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To: BfloGuy
No, English spelling is the worst feature of the language for folks who grew up speaking and reading another language. The flexibility of English is not due to the preservation of the linguistic roots of our words in their spellings nor to the irrational conventions we've stuck ourselves with (there is no reason at all that the Greek φ should have become ph rather than f), but to the fact English has drawn words from so many languages. It's expressiveness was no less, and perhaps greater, in the time before prescriptivist pedants pinned down our spelling.

Hamlet's soliloquy suffered nothing from having been originally written

To be, or not to be, that is the Question: Whether 'tis Nobler in the minde to suffer The Slings and Arrowes of outragious Fortune, Or to take Armes against a Sea of troubles, And by opposing end them: to dye, to sleepe No more; and by a sleepe, to say we end The Heart-ake, and the thousand Naturall shockes That Flesh is heyre too? 'Tis a consummation Deuoutly to be wish'd. To dye to sleepe, To sleepe, perchance to Dreame; I, there's the rub, For in that sleepe of death, what dreames may come, When we haue shuffel'd off this mortall coile, Must giue vs pawse. There's the respect That makes Calamity of so long life: For who would beare the Whips and Scornes of time, The Oppressors wrong, the poore mans Contumely, The pangs of dispriz'd Loue, the Lawes delay, The insolence of Office, and the Spurnes That patient merit of the vnworthy takes, When he himselfe might his Quietus make With a bare Bodkin? Who would these Fardles beare To grunt and sweat vnder a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The vndiscouered Countrey, from whose Borne No Traueller returnes, Puzels the will, And makes vs rather beare those illes we haue, Then flye to others that we know not of. Thus Conscience does make Cowards of vs all, And thus the Natiue hew of Resolution Is sicklied o're, with the pale cast of Thought, And enterprizes of great pith and moment, With this regard their Currants turne away, And loose the name of Action. . .
And gains nothing by being fit into the Procrustean bed of modern orthography.
19 posted on 05/28/2012 4:11:21 PM PDT by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: The_Reader_David
gains nothing by being fit into the Procrustean bed of modern orthography.

Dude, I get your point. But I don't find it an unsurmountable challenge. I'm not one for artificially modifying the language. The French have tried it for centuries and are losing the battle.

Just study your spelling and consider it your penance for being born into blessings of the Anglosphere.

20 posted on 05/28/2012 4:51:09 PM PDT by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment.)
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To: The_Reader_David
gains nothing by being fit into the Procrustean bed of modern orthography.

Dude, I get your point. But I don't find it an unsurmountable challenge. I'm not one for artificially modifying the language. The French have tried it for centuries and are losing the battle.

Just study your spelling and consider it penance for being born into the blessings of the Anglosphere.

21 posted on 05/28/2012 4:52:20 PM PDT by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment.)
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To: BfloGuy
I'm not one for artificially modifying the language.

Nor I, but that is exactly what we did when we fixed the spellings of words in the 18th century, and unlike the French attempts it seems to have stuck, except for some other artificial changes (like us and the Aussies dropping some of the pointless u's from British spelling, and the odd simplification like Boro for Borough on signs.

Language is defined by its usage, so if, for instance, enough of us decided "to hell with being thought illiterate, I'm not going to spell the 'f' sound 'ph' ever again" and started writing about fotografs, filology and the like, in a generation that would be the standard spelling with the ph spellings listed as archaic in dictionaries of those latter days. (The same with punctuation and other usage: a mass movement to not put a comma in front of "which" would eventually change "correct" usage, just as enough of us applying the modal meaning of "hopefully" is eroding the prescriptivist insistence that it only means "in a hopeful manner" -- hopefully the correctness of the modal meaning will soon be universally acknowledged.)

22 posted on 05/28/2012 5:19:47 PM PDT by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: The_Reader_David
Language is defined by its usage

Yes, you're right, of course [note the commas, I love 'em.] I just want to resist changes to the language until the pressure is irresistible. Too many of the changes, in my never-to-be-humble opinion, are due to a lack of education or the desire for ease at the expense of precision.

23 posted on 05/29/2012 3:41:49 PM PDT by BfloGuy (The final outcome of the credit expansion is general impoverishment.)
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