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Remembering Jefferson Davis: American Patriot & Southern Hero
Canada Free Press ^ | June 3, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 06/04/2012 6:00:58 AM PDT by BigReb555

Do you and your family know what is considered by some folks the largest monument to an American?

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Kentucky; US: Mississippi; US: South Carolina; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: american; anniversary; confederate; davis; dixie; jefferson; mississippi
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The sesquicentennial “150th Anniversary” of the War Between the States continues this year. The Jefferson Davis State Historic Site located in Fairview, Kentucky will mark this event with the 204th Birthday Commemoration of Jefferson Davis, first and only president of the Confederate States of America, on June 1-3.

Read more at: http://surfky.com/index.php/news/kentucky/14905-jefferson-davis-birthday-commemoration-set-for-june-1-3

Do you and your family know what is considered by some folks the largest monument to an American? I will give you the answer at the end of this article.

Look at your calendar and see what dates in history are shown for June 3rd. It more than likely excludes that of a great American, the birthday of Jefferson Davis of Mississippi. The birthday of Abraham Lincoln is shown for February, but no mention for Davis in June.

In 2008, Bertram Hayes-Davis, the great-great grandson of Jefferson Davis, recreated the 1861 swearing-in ceremony of his grandfather as Confederate President in Montgomery, Alabama. He told reporters:

"I stand here representing a family that is very proud of their ancestor."

Jefferson Finis Davis was born on June 3, 1808, in Christian County later Todd County, in the horse racing (Derby State) of Kentucky.

His grandfather was a colonist from Wales, living in Virginia and Maryland, and rendering important public service to those southern colonies.

The time is long overdue to teach our children not only the historical facts about Abraham Lincoln, but also those about Jefferson Davis. Please allow me to give you a few facts about Davis.

Jefferson Davis, the first and only President of the Confederate States of America, was a strong Unionist and defender of the United States Constitution. Our founding Fathers believed in the sovereignty of the states and so did Jefferson Davis.

Here are a few of his many accomplishments:

• Graduate of United States Military Academy at West Point.

• Fought valiantly in the War with Mexico.

• United States Senator.

• Secretary of War under President Franklin Pierce.

• First to suggest the transcontinental railroad to link the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, first to suggest the Panama Canal Zone and suggested the purchase of Cuba.

To better understand Davis, you and your family should visit "Beauvoir" on the Mississippi Gulf Coast in Biloxi. This was the last home to Jefferson Davis and where he wrote his famous book, "The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government." You can read more information about Beauvoir at: http://www.beauvoir.org.

Jefferson Davis' last marriage is said to have been a very good one to Varina, who gave her husband two sons and two daughters (Jefferson, Margaret, Winnie and Billy). One child was killed by an accidental fall at the Confederate White House in Richmond, Virginia in 1864, and an abused black child named Jim Limber was adopted by the Davis'. In 1865, Jim was forcibly removed by Union soldiers and never seen again. It is said that the Davis children were crying at the scene and poor Jim was kicking and not making it easy for his abductors. After the War Between the States, Jefferson Davis tried to locate the whereabouts of Jim Limber, but was not successful. The Davis family prayed that Jim was well and did well in his life.

There are few people who have touched so many as did Jefferson Davis. His funeral services were attended by tens of thousands of mourners. Milo Cooper, a former servant, traveled all the way from Florida to pay his last respects. It is written that, upon entering Davis' sick room, Cooper burst into tears and threw himself on his knees in prayer that God would spare the life of his old master and bless Davis family. Davis was first buried in New Orleans but later was removed to the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.

The answer to the question, "What is the largest monument to an American?" is:

The Jefferson Davis National Highway, which begins in Washington, D.C., and covers 3,417 miles as it passes through 173 counties and 13 states.

The success of the Davis Highway is attributable to the dedicated work of the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC).

1 posted on 06/04/2012 6:01:11 AM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

Jefferson Davis was a treasonous traitor.


2 posted on 06/04/2012 6:09:11 AM PDT by Notwithstanding (Christ Jesus Victor, Ruler, Lord and Redeemer!)
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To: Notwithstanding

“Jefferson Davis was a treasonous traitor.”

As opposed to one of them there nontreasonous traitors?


3 posted on 06/04/2012 6:16:12 AM PDT by JoeDetweiler
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To: BigReb555

Jeff Davis Highway rolls right past my office. I am on it every day.


4 posted on 06/04/2012 6:16:35 AM PDT by P8riot (I carry a gun because I can't carry a cop.....Eagle Scout since Sep 9, 1970)
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To: Notwithstanding
He was also a cross-dresser. Fought for slavery.

A true paragon of virtue.

5 posted on 06/04/2012 6:17:06 AM PDT by starlifter (Pullum sapit)
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To: Notwithstanding
Jefferson Davis was a treasonous traitor.
Agree 100 per cent.
Anyone calling the President of the CSA an "American Patriot" is gotta' be on drugs.
6 posted on 06/04/2012 6:17:45 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Notwithstanding

“Jefferson Davis was a treasonous traitor.”

Yes, which is why we should learn all about him, because before he became treasonous traitor, he was a Patriotic American citizen. Just like Benedict Arnold, I never knew that Arnold was a very well connected and a celebrated hero up until he did the unthinkable and turned traitor. It is important to know that traitors are not always dirty little lurking weasels looking for an opportunity to betray their country, often they are righteous honorable men up to just before the point they betray. It is important to see historical figures as human beings and to understand their situation in the events surrounding them. Knowing all this will server to remind us to be vigilant in whom we put in power today.

The more I know about Benedict Arnold the sadder I feel for him and our nation, yes he deserves the traitor brand, but I also recognize he was the hero of Saratoga. If only he could have continued to be the hero of Saratoga rather then the traitor of his country. Knowing more about Jeff Davis might help me better understand the times he lived in and what they mean to today.


7 posted on 06/04/2012 6:29:51 AM PDT by This I Wonder32460
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To: BigReb555

This is the same exact article you posted here: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2888117/posts.

Why are you spamming FreeRepublic with this tripe?


8 posted on 06/04/2012 6:31:33 AM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: Notwithstanding

More like the whole leadership were reactionary hotheads that could not work within a system that bent over backwards to accommodate their “institution” and decided to break off.


9 posted on 06/04/2012 6:37:43 AM PDT by VanDeKoik (If case you are wondering, I'm STILL supporting Newt.)
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To: BigReb555

LIttle problem: the Jefferson Davis highway was never really built. There are portions of it extant in Virginia, NC, SC, Georgia, Louisiana and California. That’s it. (There’s also a chunk of roadway in Washington State, called JDNH, but that can hardly be considered related to this effort.)

Odd matter: I travelled VA-110 for years, and marveled how it’s never named, anywhere along its brief course. Imagine my surprise to discover that it’s called Jeff Davis Highway. (I’ve known that as a name of an avenue in Pentagon City/Crystal City, but since THAT’S US-1, I had no idea that was also the name of VA-110, even though 110 DOES merge into US-1.)


10 posted on 06/04/2012 6:41:56 AM PDT by dangus
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To: This I Wonder32460
Knowing all this will serve to remind us to be vigilant in whom we put in power today.

Good post. The events of 1861 should also serve as a reminder of how easy it is to drift into a bloody war of attrition.

11 posted on 06/04/2012 6:52:22 AM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I carrying this lantern? you ask. I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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To: oh8eleven
Anyone calling the President of the CSA an "American Patriot" is gotta' be on drugs.

Agreed, if you define "America" as "USA."

However, the supporters of the CSA, though horribly misguided IMO, were still Americans.

Jeff Davis was a USA patriot to 1861, and a CSA patriot thereafter.

12 posted on 06/04/2012 6:53:46 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan
Jeff Davis was a USA patriot to 1861, and a CSA patriot thereafter.

True. But would you call Benedict Arnold a USA patriot to 1780, and a British patriot thereafter?

Should the word "traitor" not be applied?

13 posted on 06/04/2012 6:58:32 AM PDT by Leaning Right (Why am I carrying this lantern? you ask. I am looking for the next Reagan.)
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To: Sherman Logan
“a CSA patriot “

That's like saying Hitler was a German patriot after he decamped from Austria.

14 posted on 06/04/2012 6:58:54 AM PDT by starlifter (Pullum sapit)
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To: Notwithstanding

And yet, he was your brother in Christ. God bless you.


15 posted on 06/04/2012 7:09:02 AM PDT by Jemian
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To: Notwithstanding

Jefferson Davis sought to tbe tried for treason and was indicted. The US government delayed the trial on several ocassions and subsequently Davis was issued a full pardon.


16 posted on 06/04/2012 7:11:29 AM PDT by wfu_deacons
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To: Leaning Right
Calling the heroes of our sister States "traitors," because they sought to dissolve a relationship freely entered into, when they believed that the Federal Government that administered that relationship would no longer treat them fairly, does not help rally American Conservatives to a common cause, today.

Benedict Arnold did not challenge the compact, still in formation, when he betrayed the Continental Army. He betrayed it by stealth, in the middle of the War, for personal benefit. If you want a comparison, look at someone like Quisling in Norway (the Norwegian Socialist) who used stealth to invite the German Socialists in, while those who trusted him slept. Jefferson Davis, honorably, resigned from the Senate, when Mississippi seceded, and explained his reason in a brief, to the point address.

Jefferson Davis behaved with honor, as did Robert E. Lee. Benedict Arnold, like Quisling--and like those trying to betray America into a World Government, today--behaved with total dishonor.

William Flax

17 posted on 06/04/2012 7:15:32 AM PDT by Ohioan
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To: Ohioan

Well and truly stated, sir.


18 posted on 06/04/2012 7:22:37 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: starlifter

“Fought for slavery.”

So did those in the Revolutionary War. The US Constitution has slavery in it.

Oh, did you know that the first slave was a black man and his owner was also a black man? It was a black man that started slavery in the US when slavery was not allowed. He went to court and got an order giving him rights to another human being, another black man. That’s right, a black man started slavery and the founding fathers upheld slavery in the US.


19 posted on 06/04/2012 7:22:59 AM PDT by CodeToad (Homosexuals are homophobes. They insist on being called 'gay' instead.)
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To: Notwithstanding

You sir should make one last attempt to graduate 8th grade.


20 posted on 06/04/2012 7:25:00 AM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: Notwithstanding
And Lincoln was a blood thirsty dictator. So I guess everything is equal.

That treason trial and execution of Jeff Davis was really somethi...Oh, wait Davis wanted a trial but the cowards in DC wouldn't give him one. Never mind.

21 posted on 06/04/2012 7:29:08 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

And Obeyme was hailed as the second coming of Lincoln.

How’s that working out for us?


22 posted on 06/04/2012 7:31:19 AM PDT by Salamander
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To: Salamander

DADT President Bump.

23 posted on 06/04/2012 7:36:34 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: MHGinTN

Thank you!


24 posted on 06/04/2012 7:37:41 AM PDT by Ohioan
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To: starlifter

Why don't you pettition vDOT and have them change this sign from "Jeff Davis" to Traitor Hwy. LOL.

Davis was a great American and believed in the republic. You wouldn't know a republic if it bit you on the arse.

25 posted on 06/04/2012 7:41:05 AM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: wfu_deacons

There is nothing in the founding documents that says what he and the CSA Government did was treasonous. If he had gone to trial—he could have won. Many states considered Session before 1860—including New England (during the unpopular Mexican War). The Bloody Civil War should have been avoided if cooler heads had prevailed.


26 posted on 06/04/2012 7:50:38 AM PDT by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: Ohioan

Excellent post and accurate. Jefferson Davis was honorable to the people and the US Constitution, until the people in power allowed it to fail his people.


27 posted on 06/04/2012 7:56:12 AM PDT by PeaRidge
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To: central_va

Good comment.


28 posted on 06/04/2012 7:57:30 AM PDT by PeaRidge
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To: central_va

Heh.


29 posted on 06/04/2012 7:59:43 AM PDT by Salamander
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To: Forward the Light Brigade

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_secession#New_York_City_secession


30 posted on 06/04/2012 8:03:20 AM PDT by Salamander
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To: Forward the Light Brigade
I live in Kentucky. Here we have a true monument to the first and only president of the Confederacy.

At 351 feet tall, it is the largest [unreinforced] concrete obelisk in the world, and the fifth tallest monument in the United States. The top four are St. Louis's Gateway Arch, 630 feet tall; San Jacinto (Texas) Monument, 570 feet (built to the peoples who created an independent country -- just like the Confederates); the Washington Monument, 555 feet; and the Perry's Victory and International Peace Memorial at Put in Bay, Ohio, which, at 352 feet, nudges its way past the Davis obelisk by a mere extra 12 inches. The Davis monument was conceived in 1907, at a reunion of the Orphan's Brigade of the Confederate Army. In 1917, construction began. After a halt during World War I, the obelisk was finally completed in 1924. The walls are seven feet thick at the base, two feet thick at the top. The monument features an elevator to an observation room.

The view from the observation room of the surrounding countryside are beautiful. I stumbled upon this by accident while driving on business near Fairview, KY. Upon seeing the monument in the distance I drove towards it until I came to the parking lot. The site was virtually vacant except for me and the elevator operator that took me to the observation room.

31 posted on 06/04/2012 8:09:57 AM PDT by JAKraig (Surely my religion is at least as good as yours)
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To: JoeDetweiler

Snicker...


32 posted on 06/04/2012 8:10:51 AM PDT by ejonesie22 (8/30/10, the day Truth won.)
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To: Ohioan
Calling the heroes of our sister States "traitors," because they sought to dissolve a relationship freely entered into, when they believed that the Federal Government that administered that relationship would no longer treat them fairly, does not help rally American Conservatives to a common cause, today.

Amen. Good post. 

33 posted on 06/04/2012 8:19:25 AM PDT by zeugma (Those of us who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living.)
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To: Notwithstanding

>>Jefferson Davis was a treasonous traitor.<<

Here we go again. 500 posts later, we will have changed no minds and we will be as polarized as the U.S. Congress. I have one question for all the Yankee critics of the Confederacy: Under what circumstances, if any, is any state able to opt out of its membership in the Union?

150 years ago, we had a President from Illinois who started a war against the states, disregarding the Constitution and freed the slaves. Today, we have a President from Illinois who is waging war against the states, disregards the Constitution and wants to make us all slaves.


34 posted on 06/04/2012 8:26:02 AM PDT by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: NTHockey

It was the south who initiated hostilities not the north.


35 posted on 06/04/2012 8:29:55 AM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: Jemian

Yes, just as is the traitor Nancy Pelosi. What is your point - we can’t criticize persons claiming to be Christians?


36 posted on 06/04/2012 8:49:23 AM PDT by Notwithstanding (Christ Jesus Victor, Ruler, Lord and Redeemer!)
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To: NTHockey
NTHockey wrote - 150 years ago, we had a President from Illinois who started a war against the states
Ah, one too many pucks to your head?
37 posted on 06/04/2012 9:25:10 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Notwithstanding

So were George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. What’s your point?


38 posted on 06/04/2012 9:28:21 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: rockrr

“It was the south who initiated hostilities not the north.”

That’s all a matter of perspective, isn’t it? One could say that, by occupying sovereign territory against the wishes of the state government, the Feds initiated hostilities. They wouldn’t have expected to park US troops at a fort in Canada and gotten away with it, would they?


39 posted on 06/04/2012 9:37:56 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: NTHockey
Under what circumstances, if any, is any state able to opt out of its membership in the Union?

With the consent of Congress..the same way you came in.

40 posted on 06/04/2012 9:46:20 AM PDT by mac_truck ( Aide toi et dieu t aidera)
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To: Boogieman

Any rebellion based on resistance to the arguably unconstitutional forced liberation of human slaves is a rebellion that is morally bankrupt.

The undeniable truths in the Declaration of Independence are pure and justify any “rebellion” by Washington and Jefferson.

There is no purity in a rebellion triggered by opposition to the imposed liberation of human slaves.


41 posted on 06/04/2012 9:47:27 AM PDT by Notwithstanding (Christ Jesus Victor, Ruler, Lord and Redeemer!)
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To: Ohioan

Well said and true. South Carolina thanks you.

I suppose the poster calling Jeff Davis a traitor would infer that all southerners were traitors, Lee, Jackson, and all the Confederate soldiers as well.

I say that poster does not know Southern history, let alone American history.

I guess some yankees would have us all shot even today, yet how many of them wish their state would secede now and leave the liberals and obama in ‘another country’?


42 posted on 06/04/2012 10:01:58 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Looking for our Sam Adams)
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To: Notwithstanding

“Any rebellion based on resistance to the arguably unconstitutional forced liberation of human slaves is a rebellion that is morally bankrupt.”

What’s worse? Fighting against the forced liberation of human slaves or fighting for the forced bondage of men to the government? Neither side was morally commendable in that war.


43 posted on 06/04/2012 10:08:56 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: snippy_about_it
That's the irony of these threads. Many of the Yankees calling these men traitors here will be the first ones on threads about CW2 and such as things get worse under Obama.

Ones man's freedom fighter is another man's rebel...

And if the South still sucks to this day, why do these Yankees keep moving down here...

44 posted on 06/04/2012 11:08:56 AM PDT by ejonesie22 (8/30/10, the day Truth won.)
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To: Boogieman

No, no, no.

It is always justified to liberate a slave, even if it would be unconstitutional to do so. No constitution can properly prevent the liberation of slaves. A constitution that permits slavery need not be heeded because it is illegitimate in the most profound way. To rise up against slavery even without amending such a constitution is morally valid. Just as if today the president would station troops outside of abortion clinics to shut them down, despite it being “against the law”, the laws are radically unjust in that they enshrine innocent-child-murder as a right.

But you can keep pretending that slavery was a little black mark, and not the gigantic festering cancer that it was.

Lincoln was a hero even if he acted outside the constitution.

Davis did not have such profound injustice in his corner.


45 posted on 06/04/2012 11:19:37 AM PDT by Notwithstanding (Christ Jesus Victor, Ruler, Lord and Redeemer!)
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To: Sherman Logan

A CSA patriot is a USA traitor.


46 posted on 06/04/2012 11:22:05 AM PDT by Notwithstanding (Christ Jesus Victor, Ruler, Lord and Redeemer!)
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To: mac_truck

Actually, the original 13 states ratified(i.e, approved) the Constitution in state legislatures. They created a federal government. They needed no approval from Congress SINCE CONGRESS NEVER APPROVED THEIR STATEHOOD.

Thus, VA, NC, SC, GA broke no law when they seceeded. Likewise, TX was free to seceed having been unique among the states as a republic prior to staehood.


47 posted on 06/04/2012 11:32:40 AM PDT by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: oh8eleven

>>, one too many pucks to your head?<<

Exactly the kind of intelligent comment I would expect from a DU troll.


48 posted on 06/04/2012 11:36:55 AM PDT by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: CodeToad
It was a black man that started slavery in the US when slavery was not allowed. He went to court and got an order giving him rights to another human being, another black man.

_________________________________________

What were their names, were they the only two Blacks in America and how did they get here in the first place?

49 posted on 06/04/2012 11:41:11 AM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
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To: wtc911

Anthony Johnson, a former indentured servant who’d served out his term of indenture was the owner. John Casor was the indentured servant who became the first chattel slave, owned by Anthony Johnson. Northampton County, Virginia, early 1600’s.


50 posted on 06/04/2012 11:50:39 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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