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FReeper Canteen ~ D-Day, June 6, 1944 ~ 06 June 2012
Serving The Best Troops and Veterans In The World !! | The Canteen Crew

Posted on 06/05/2012 5:59:22 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska





~ FReeper Canteen Presents ~

~ D-DAY, June 6, 1944 ~


NORMANDY INVASION

May 1944 had been chosen at the conference in Washington in May 1943 as the time for the invasion. Difficulties in assembling landing craft forced a postponement until June, but June 5 was fixed as the unalterable date by Eisenhower on May 17. As the day approached and troops began to embark for the crossing, bad weather set in, threatening dangerous landing conditions. After tense debate, Eisenhower and his subordinates decided on a 24-hour delay, requiring the recall of some ships already at sea. Eventually, on the morning of June 5, Eisenhower, assured by chief meteorologist James Martin Stagg of a break in the weather, announced, “O.K. We'll go.” Within hours an armada of 3,000 landing craft, 2,500 other ships, and 500 naval vessels—escorts and bombardment ships—began to leave English ports. That night 822 aircraft, carrying parachutists or towing gliders, roared overhead to the Normandy landing zones. They were a fraction of the air armada of 13,000 aircraft that would support D-Day.

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Canteen Mission Statement

Showing support and boosting the morale of
our military and our allies' military
and family members of the above.
Honoring those who have served before.





January 1944 meeting of Operation Overlord Commanders, General Eisenhower, Walter B. Smith, Omar Bradley, Arthur Tedder, Bernard Montgomery, Trafford Leigh-Mallory and Bertram Ramsay. The Eisenhower Presidential Library

GENERAL EISENHOWER’S MESSAGE SENT JUST PRIOR TO THE INVASION

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened, he will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man to man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our home fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to victory!

I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory!

Good Luck! And let us all beseech the blessings of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.

-- Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

D-DAY AIRBORNE AND BEACH ASSAULT

The Normandy beaches were chosen by planners because they lay within range of air cover, and were less heavily defended than the obvious objective of the Pas de Calais, the shortest distance between Great Britain and the Continent. Airborne drops at both ends of the beachheads were to protect the flanks, as well as open up roadways to the interior. Six divisions were to land on the first day; three U.S., two British and one Canadian. Two more British and one U.S. division were to follow up after the assault division had cleared the way through the beach defenses.

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LINKS


Leaders and Generals

Veteran’s Oral Histories

Combat Video

Interactive Charts & Maps

War Documents

Learning Activities


American Patrol

The Army Air Corps

G I Jive

A Fellow On A Furlough

A Nightingale Sang In Berkeley Square


AIRBORNE MUSEUM HOUSES ONE-OF-A-KIND ARTIFACTS
THAT HONOR HISTORIC JUMP DURING D-DAY INVASION

SAINTE MERE EGLISE, France - This town loves paratroopers - in particular, American paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne and the 101st Airborne Divisions.


Phillip Myers of Saratoga Springs, a D-Day paratrooper with the 101st Airbourne Division, salutes during a D-Day survivors reunion June 4, 2011, in Colonie. (John Carl D'Annibale / Times Union)

It was those two divisions that liberated Sainte Mere Eglise June 7, 1944, making it the first town in France to be liberated during World War II.

To show their appreciation for the veterans, an Airborne Museum opened here in 1964. A non-profit organization, all proceeds go back into the museum to pay for upkeep, new exhibits or extensions. The money is also used to provide decorations and celebrations for the anniversary of D-Day, travel for veterans, and exhibitions outside France. A large donation was also made to The National World War II museum in New Orleans, La.

The rest of the story

Bugle Call Rag

Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree

Jeep Jockey Jump

Moonlight Serenade

Enlisted Men’s Mess


SOLDIERS PREP TO SUPPORT D-DAY CEREMONIES FOR
65TH ANNIVERSARY OF INVASION

Senior staff members of Task Force Normandy 65 pose in front of a German gun post at Pointe du Hoc, France. Task Force Normandy 65 is in France providing support and ceremonial command and control for the 65th anniversary of D-Day, June 6, 2009. Pointe du Hoc is the site of the 2nd Ranger Battalion's assault on a German stronghold during D-Day. Photo credit Sgt. Fay Conroy, 21st Theater Sustainment Command Public Affairs

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NORMANDY AMERICAN CEMETERY AND MEMORIAL

The Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial in France is located on the site of the temporary American St. Laurent Cemetery, established by the U.S. First Army on June 8, 1944 and the first American cemetery on European soil in World War II. The cemetery site, at the north end of its ½ mile access road, covers 172.5 acres and contains the graves of 9,387 of our military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the D-Day landings and ensuing operations. On the Walls of the Missing in a semicircular garden on the east side of the memorial are inscribed 1,557 names. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

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Please remember that The Canteen is here to support
and entertain our troops and veterans and their families,
and is family friendly.





TOPICS: Culture/Society; FReeper Editorial; Free Republic
KEYWORDS: canteen; dday; military; troopsupport
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1 posted on 06/05/2012 5:59:33 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska
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To: Kathy in Alaska
Good morning Troops, Veterans and Canteeners.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Our Flag Flying Proudly One Nation Under God

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Lord, Please Bless Our Troops, They're fighting for our Freedom.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

God Bless Our Republic

I pledge allegiance to the Flag
of the United States of America,
and to the Republic, for which it stands;
one nation UNDER GOD,
indivisible,
with liberty and justice for all.

Prayers going up


2 posted on 06/05/2012 6:00:27 PM PDT by HopeandGlory (Hey, Liberals . . . PC died on 9/11 . . . GET USED TO IT!!!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska


REQUEST PERMISSION TO COME ABOARD!





GOD BLESS AND PROTECT OUR TROOPS!!!





BOSTON, (Oct. 21, 2009) Boatswains Mate 2nd Class Philip Gagnon pipes as USS Constitution performs an underway demonstration in honor of the three-masted wooden frigate's 212th birthday. (U.S. Navy photo by Airman Mark Alexander/Released).
(Click for Bosun’s Whistle)




USS Constitution's 1812 Marine Guard fire vintage Springfield flintlock muskets during the ship's underway. "Old Ironsides" was underway for the "Constitution Day Cruise," which is conducted to thank the family and supporters of Constitution. U.S. Navy photo by Airman Nick Lyman (RELEASED)

OUR TROOPS ROCK!!!!!!!







Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

3 posted on 06/05/2012 6:02:20 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
Aloha Night Owl!
4 posted on 06/05/2012 6:03:41 PM PDT by BIGLOOK
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To: MoJo2001; 007; 1 FELLOW FREEPER; 11B3; 1FreeAmerican; 1stbn27; 2111USMC; 2LT Radix jr; 300winmag; ..

~ D-Day, June 6, 1944 ~

FR CANTEEN MISSION STATEMENT

Showing support and boosting the morale of
our military and our allies’ military
and the family members of the above.
Honoring those who have served before.

CLICK HERE TO FIND LATEST THREADS



CLICK FOR Current local times around the world

CLICK FOR local times in Seoul, Baghdad, Kabul,
New York, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Anchorage


To every service man or woman reading this thread.
Thank You for your service to our country.
No matter where you are stationed,
No matter what your job description
Know that we are are proud of each and everyone of you.

To our military readers, we remain steadfast
in keeping the Canteen doors open.

The FR Canteen is Free Republic's longest running daily thread
specifically designed to provide entertainment and moral support for the military.

The doors have been open since Oct 7 2001,
the day of the start of the war in Afghanistan.

We are indebted to you for your sacrifices for our Freedom.



NOTE: CANTEEN MUSIC
Posted daily and on the Music Thread
for the enjoyment of our troops and visitors.


5 posted on 06/05/2012 6:09:38 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: ConorMacNessa
Permission Granted!


6 posted on 06/05/2012 6:14:29 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

7 posted on 06/05/2012 6:14:41 PM PDT by moonshot925
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To: HopeandGlory
Thanks, Nana Hope, for today's Pledge…((HUGS)) Thanks, AfghanMan and Penguin Girl, for your service to America.


8 posted on 06/05/2012 6:17:14 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

Hi Everybody!
(((HUGS)))

Thank you for your D-Day observance!


9 posted on 06/05/2012 6:20:04 PM PDT by left that other site
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To: SoldierDad; arbee4bush; vigilante2; Jemian; Old_Professor; mystery-ak; freema; kalee; ...
Thanks, Families, for your service to our country.

Thanks, unique, for the perfect woohoo.


John Conlee ~ They Also Serve


10 posted on 06/05/2012 6:23:27 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska
Thanks very much, Kathy!

*HUGS*

And thanks very much for tonight's D-Day, June 6, 1944 ~ June 6, 2012 thread! A crucial battle in the Crusade for Europe! We hold in highest honor the American, British and Canadian boys who fought, bled and fell in that struggle!



Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

11 posted on 06/05/2012 6:25:23 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: txradioguy; SoldierDad; mike1sg; Milo828; mystery-ak; CMS; The Sailor; Jet Jaguar; Defender2; ...
Honoring Our Heroes

2LT Rebecca USA (Daughter of U S Army EOD)
3 sons (armymarinemom and amdad)
86th Fighter Weapons Squadron "Combat Hammer" (saminfl)
AbnSarge USA
Adam USAF (Grumpybutt)
Allegra
Anoreth USCG (daughter of Tax-chick)
aviator USAF
BIGLOOK USN
Brett USN (CindyDawg)
Brother and Son-in-Law (kalee)
Cannoneer No. 4
CAPT Bryan USA (Diver Dave)
CAPT Future Snake Eater USA (RightOnline)
CAPT Jason Clendenin (friend of Frou)
Chris USA (amom)
Chuck USA (RightOnline)
CMS USA
COL Mike (gpapa)
ConorMacNessa FMF Corpsman
CPT Carol USA, Nurse Corp (Vineyard)
David USAF (LUV W)
Defender2
Deven USA (Shimmer)
Diver Dave USN
Drumbo USN
Ethan USMC (georgiabelle)
forgotenknight13 USA (grandson of Monkey Face)
Fred (DocRock)
GulfWar1Vet USA
HiJinx USA
IS2 Brianne USN (My Hearts in London - Everett)
IS2 Heather USN (My Hearts in London - Everett)
Jade Falcon USN
James USA (Grumpybutt)
JemiansTerror USA (Jemian)
Jet Jaguar USAF
Joel (NEMDF)
Jonathan USMC (AZbushgal)
Josh USN (doug from upland)
Karen USA (fatima's granddaughter)
Kenneth (Sweetbaby/LadyPilgrim)
Kevin USMC (skimask)
Kevin and David USA (vigilante2)
KJD USAF (SuzyQue)
Laurita USA
LCpl Carter USMC
LCpl Joe USMC (Don’tMessWithTexas)
Lindsay (Sweetbaby/LadyPilgrim)
LT David (Coldwater Creek)
LT Gerald USN (Vineyard)
M1911A1 USMC (M0sby)
M1Tanker
Major Jennifer USA (Diver Dave)
Major joma89 USAF
MEG33's Navy Grandson
Michael USAR (RightOnline)
Mike1Sg USA (mystery-ak)
Milo828 USA (mystery-ak)
MSgt Eddie USAF ( Son of ThomasPaine2000, CMSgt USAF, Ret)
MSGT Glen Ignasiak USAF (nephew of AirForceMom)
Nate USN (sneakers)
Navy Chaplain, Lt Nathan Rice (Coldwater Creek)
Old Sarge USA
OneLoyalAmerican USCG
PFC Jake USMC (son of Enough_Deceit)
Philetus USA
PROCON USA
Rick USAF (Doogle)
Robert, Jeremy, Daynnis USA (SoldierDad)
SandRat USA
Sat-Com Chris USA (son of KC Burke)
SGT Alex USA (son of Enough_Deceit)
SGT Chris USA (son of Vineyard)
SGT Ev USA (Mozie)
SGT Gray USA (colorcountry’s son)
SGT Matt USMC (SuzyQue)
SGT Robert USMC (MarineMom613)
SGT Sean Reed (preed)
Son USCG (GodBlessUSA)
SPC Drew USA (brother-in-law Stonewall Jackson)
SPC Mike USA (AbnSarge)
SPC Ted USA (nephew of hoagy62)
SPC William Akin USA (Step-son of BlueLancer)
SPC4 Dan USA (son of swmobuffalo)
SSG Brian USA (repubmom)
SSG Dustin USA (SIL of U S Army EOD)
SSG Dusty USA (MountainDad)
SSG Mitchel USA (tina07)
SSG Spencer USA (grame)
SSGT Adam USA (Diver Dave)
SSGT Don May Jr USMC (debm29palms)
SSGT John Linde USA (JFoxbear)
SSGT The Black Knight USAF
Stevan USA (Grumpybutt)
Terrence USN (Sweetbaby/LadyPilgrim)
The Sailor
TMSuchman USMC
tongue-tied USN/USA
Tonkin USN/USCG
TSGT Jason M Kibler USAF (son of AirForceMom)
SFC txradioguy USA
USAFSecurityForces (son of visualops & TheStickman)
Valerie USAF (Shimmer)
Victor and Tony D USMC (weldgophardline)
Vineyard USN
William USA (jackv)
WOs Bob and Michelle USA (nephew, and his wife, of BnBlFlag)

 



12 posted on 06/05/2012 6:25:34 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: HopeandGlory
Nana Hope!!


13 posted on 06/05/2012 6:31:35 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

My Father was scheduled to land on D-Day They were Combat Engineers. Crossing the English Channel, they developed engine trouble and had to return to England for repairs.

They finally did land on D-Day plus 5 days which is fortunate for them. I saw on the History Channel that on D-Day, combat engineers suffered 80% casualties, more than any other group.


14 posted on 06/05/2012 6:33:24 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


THE BOYS OF POINTE DU HOC





We're here to mark that day in history when the Allied armies joined in battle to reclaim this continent to liberty. For 4 long years, much of Europe had been under a terrible shadow. Free nations had fallen, Jews cried out in the camps, millions cried out for liberation. Europe was enslaved, and the world prayed for its rescue. Here in Normandy the rescue began. Here the Allies stood and fought against tyranny in a giant undertaking unparalleled in human history.

We stand on a lonely, windswept point on the northern shore of France. The air is soft, but 40 years ago at this moment, the air was dense with smoke and the cries of men, and the air was filled with the crack of rifle fire and the roar of cannon. At dawn, on the morning of the 6th of June, 1944, 225 Rangers jumped off the British landing craft and ran to the bottom of these cliffs. Their mission was one of the most difficult and daring of the invasion: to climb these sheer and desolate cliffs and take out the enemy guns. The Allies had been told that some of the mightiest of these guns were here and they would be trained on the beaches to stop the Allied advance.

The Rangers looked up and saw the enemy soldiers -- the edge of the cliffs shooting down at them with machineguns and throwing grenades. And the American Rangers began to climb. They shot rope ladders over the face of these cliffs and began to pull themselves up. When one Ranger fell, another would take his place. When one rope was cut, a Ranger would grab another and begin his climb again. They climbed, shot back, and held their footing. Soon, one by one, the Rangers pulled themselves over the top, and in seizing the firm land at the top of these cliffs, they began to seize back the continent of Europe. Two hundred and twenty-five came here. After 2 days of fighting, only 90 could still bear arms.

Behind me is a memorial that symbolizes the Ranger daggers that were thrust into the top of these cliffs. And before me are the men who put them there.

These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs. These are the champions who helped free a continent. These are the heroes who helped end a war.

Gentlemen, I look at you and I think of the words of Stephen Spender's poem. You are men who in your ``lives fought for life . . . and left the vivid air signed with your honor.''

I think I know what you may be thinking right now -- thinking ``we were just part of a bigger effort; everyone was brave that day.'' Well, everyone was. Do you remember the story of Bill Millin of the 51st Highlanders? Forty years ago today, British troops were pinned down near a bridge, waiting desperately for help. Suddenly, they heard the sound of bagpipes, and some thought they were dreaming. Well, they weren't. They looked up and saw Bill Millin with his bagpipes, leading the reinforcements and ignoring the smack of the bullets into the ground around him.

Lord Lovat was with him -- Lord Lovat of Scotland, who calmly announced when he got to the bridge, ``Sorry I'm a few minutes late,'' as if he'd been delayed by a traffic jam, when in truth he'd just come from the bloody fighting on Sword Beach, which he and his men had just taken.

There was the impossible valor of the Poles who threw themselves between the enemy and the rest of Europe as the invasion took hold, and the unsurpassed courage of the Canadians who had already seen the horrors of war on this coast. They knew what awaited them there, but they would not be deterred. And once they hit Juno Beach, they never looked back.

All of these men were part of a rollcall of honor with names that spoke of a pride as bright as the colors they bore: the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Poland's 24th Lancers, the Royal Scots Fusiliers, the Screaming Eagles, the Yeomen of England's armored divisions, the forces of Free France, the Coast Guard's ``Matchbox Fleet'' and you, the American Rangers.

Forty summers have passed since the battle that you fought here. You were young the day you took these cliffs; some of you were hardly more than boys, with the deepest joys of life before you. Yet, you risked everything here. Why? Why did you do it? What impelled you to put aside the instinct for self-preservation and risk your lives to take these cliffs? What inspired all the men of the armies that met here? We look at you, and somehow we know the answer. It was faith and belief; it was loyalty and love.

The men of Normandy had faith that what they were doing was right, faith that they fought for all humanity, faith that a just God would grant them mercy on this beachhead or on the next. It was the deep knowledge -- and pray God we have not lost it -- that there is a profound, moral difference between the use of force for liberation and the use of force for conquest. You were here to liberate, not to conquer, and so you and those others did not doubt your cause. And you were right not to doubt.

You all knew that some things are worth dying for. One's country is worth dying for, and democracy is worth dying for, because it's the most deeply honorable form of government ever devised by man. All of you loved liberty. All of you were willing to fight tyranny, and you knew the people of your countries were behind you.

The Americans who fought here that morning knew word of the invasion was spreading through the darkness back home. They fought -- or felt in their hearts, though they couldn't know in fact, that in Georgia they were filling the churches at 4 a.m., in Kansas they were kneeling on their porches and praying, and in Philadelphia they were ringing the Liberty Bell.

Something else helped the men of D-day: their rockhard belief that Providence would have a great hand in the events that would unfold here; that God was an ally in this great cause. And so, the night before the invasion, when Colonel Wolverton asked his parachute troops to kneel with him in prayer he told them: Do not bow your heads, but look up so you can see God and ask His blessing in what we're about to do. Also that night, General Matthew Ridgway on his cot, listening in the darkness for the promise God made to Joshua: ``I will not fail thee nor forsake thee.''

These are the things that impelled them; these are the things that shaped the unity of the Allies.

When the war was over, there were lives to be rebuilt and governments to be returned to the people. There were nations to be reborn. Above all, there was a new peace to be assured. These were huge and daunting tasks. But the Allies summoned strength from the faith, belief, loyalty, and love of those who fell here. They rebuilt a new Europe together.

There was first a great reconciliation among those who had been enemies, all of whom had suffered so greatly. The United States did its part, creating the Marshall plan to help rebuild our allies and our former enemies. The Marshall plan led to the Atlantic alliance -- a great alliance that serves to this day as our shield for freedom, for prosperity, and for peace.

In spite of our great efforts and successes, not all that followed the end of the war was happy or planned. Some liberated countries were lost. The great sadness of this loss echoes down to our own time in the streets of Warsaw, Prague, and East Berlin. Soviet troops that came to the center of this continent did not leave when peace came. They're still there, uninvited, unwanted, unyielding, almost 40 years after the war. Because of this, allied forces still stand on this continent. Today, as 40 years ago, our armies are here for only one purpose -- to protect and defend democracy. The only territories we hold are memorials like this one and graveyards where our heroes rest.

We in America have learned bitter lessons from two World Wars: It is better to be here ready to protect the peace, than to take blind shelter across the sea, rushing to respond only after freedom is lost. We've learned that isolationism never was and never will be an acceptable response to tyrannical governments with an expansionist intent.

But we try always to be prepared for peace; prepared to deter aggression; prepared to negotiate the reduction of arms; and, yes, prepared to reach out again in the spirit of reconciliation. In truth, there is no reconciliation we would welcome more than a reconciliation with the Soviet Union, so, together, we can lessen the risks of war, now and forever.

It's fitting to remember here the great losses also suffered by the Russian people during World War II: 20 million perished, a terrible price that testifies to all the world the necessity of ending war. I tell you from my heart that we in the United States do not want war. We want to wipe from the face of the Earth the terrible weapons that man now has in his hands. And I tell you, we are ready to seize that beachhead. We look for some sign from the Soviet Union that they are willing to move forward, that they share our desire and love for peace, and that they will give up the ways of conquest. There must be a changing there that will allow us to turn our hope into action.

We will pray forever that some day that changing will come. But for now, particularly today, it is good and fitting to renew our commitment to each other, to our freedom, and to the alliance that protects it.

We are bound today by what bound us 40 years ago, the same loyalties, traditions, and beliefs. We're bound by reality. The strength of America's allies is vital to the United States, and the American security guarantee is essential to the continued freedom of Europe's democracies. We were with you then; we are with you now. Your hopes are our hopes, and your destiny is our destiny.

Here, in this place where the West held together, let us make a vow to our dead. Let us show them by our actions that we understand what they died for. Let our actions say to them the words for which Matthew Ridgway listened: ``I will not fail thee nor forsake thee.''

Strengthened by their courage, heartened by their value [valor], and borne by their memory, let us continue to stand for the ideals for which they lived and died.

Thank you very much, and God bless you all.

President Ronald Reagan - June 6, 1984








Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

15 posted on 06/05/2012 6:34:51 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
Kathy, thank you so much for the D-Day Observance.

What an amazing feat America and her Allies entered into that day. What leaders we had-Backbones of steel. Thank you WW2 Vets and Thank You to all our Heroes. BTW, there are many Europeans who have not forgotten. Please enjoy the link below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdrvtiSmP1w&feature=related

16 posted on 06/05/2012 6:36:04 PM PDT by Chgogal (WSJ, Coulter, Kristol, Krauthammer, Rove et al., STFU. Thank you.)
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To: ConorMacNessa
Mac!!


17 posted on 06/05/2012 6:38:32 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


Welcome To All Who Enter This Canteen, To Our Serving Military, To Our Veterans, To All Military Families, To Our FRiends and To Our Allies!





Missing Man Setting

“The Empty Chair”

By Captain Carroll “Lex” Lefon, USN (ret), on December 21st, 2004

“In the wardroom onboard the aircraft carrier from which I recently debarked was a small, round table, with single chair. No one ever sat there, and the reasons, both for the table being there, and for the fact that the chair was always empty, will tell the reader a little bit about who we are as a culture.The wardroom, of course, is where the officers will dine; morning, noon and evening. It is not only a place to eat – it is also a kind of oasis from the sometimes dreary, often difficult exigencies of the service. A place of social discourse, of momentary relief from the burdens of the day. The only things explicitly forbidden by inviolable tradition in the wardroom are the wearing of a cover or sword by an officer not actually on watch, or conversation which touches upon politics or religion. But aboard ships which observe the custom, another implicit taboo concerns the empty chair: No matter how crowded the room, no matter who is waiting to be seated, that chair is never moved, never taken.

The table is by the main entrance to the wardroom. You will see it when you enter, and you will see it when you leave. It draws your eyes because it is meant to. And because it draws your eyes it draws your thoughts. And though it will be there every day for as long as you are at sea, you will look at it every time and your eyes will momentarily grow distant as you think for a moment. As you quietly give thanks.

As you remember.

The small, round table is covered with a white linen tablecloth. A single place setting rests there, of fine bone china. A wineglass stands upon the table, inverted, empty. On the dinner plate is a pinch of salt. On the bread plate is a slice of lemon. Besides the plate lies a bible. There is a small vase with a single red rose upon the table. Around the vase is wound a yellow ribbon. There is the empty chair.

We will remember because over the course of our careers, we will have had the opportunity to enjoy many a formal evening of dinner and dancing in the fine company of those with whom we have the honor to serve, and their lovely ladies. And as the night wears on, our faces will in time become flushed with pleasure of each other’s company, with the exertions on the dance floor, with the effects of our libations. But while the feast is still at its best, order will be called to the room – we will be asked to raise our glasses to the empty table, and we will be asked to remember:

The table is round to show our everlasting concern for those who are missing. The single setting reminds us that every one of them went to their fates alone, that every life was unique.

The tablecloth is white symbolizing the purity of their motives when they answered the call to duty.

The single red rose, displayed in a vase, reminds us of the life of each of the missing, and their loved ones who kept the faith.

The yellow ribbon around the vase symbolizes our continued determination to remember them.

The slice of lemon reminds us of the bitterness of their fate.
The salt symbolizes the tears shed by those who loved them.
The bible represents the faith that sustained them.
The glass is inverted — they cannot share in the toast.
The chair is empty — they are not here. They are missing.

And we will remember, and we will raise our glasses to those who went before us, and who gave all that they had for us. And a part of the flush in our faces will pale as we remember that nothing worth having ever came without a cost. We will remember that many of our brothers and sisters have paid that cost in blood. We will remember that the reckoning is not over.

We many of us will settle with our families into our holiday season, our Christmas season for those who celebrate it, content in our fortune and prosperity. We will meet old friends with smiles and laughter. We will meet our members of our family with hugs. We will eat well, and exchange gifts and raise our glasses to the year passed in gratitude, and to the year to come with hope. We will sleep the sleep of the protected, secure in our homes, secure in our homeland.

But for many families, there will be an empty chair at the table this year. A place that is not filled.

We should remember.”

Thanks To Alfa6 For The Narrative Of “The Empty Chair.”

Schumann - Traumerei
(Click)


Never Forget Those Who Sacrificed All That We Could Live In Freedom!!






Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

18 posted on 06/05/2012 6:41:09 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
My dad's boat, LCT 457:

Flotilla 4, Tare Green Sector, Utah Beach. He had an Army engineer company with bulldozers and TNT.

This picture was taken in February 1944. Looks like a VIP tour.

19 posted on 06/05/2012 6:42:25 PM PDT by real saxophonist (The fact that you play tuba doesn't make you any less lethal. -USMC bandsman in Iraq)
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To: Kathy in Alaska

God bless them all. They saved us.


20 posted on 06/05/2012 6:48:44 PM PDT by combat_boots (The Lion of Judah cometh. Hallelujah. Gloria Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto.)
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To: BIGLOOK
Hawaii!!


21 posted on 06/05/2012 6:50:35 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: combat_boots
Good evening, combat_boots....

They saved us.

Awesome job! Huge expense! But they did it!! God Bless them for sure.

22 posted on 06/05/2012 6:54:33 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


THE SOLDIER’S CODE




Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses troops of the 101st Airborne Division 5Jun1944 prior to D-Day Normandy

The Soldier’s Code

1) I am an American fighting man. I serve in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

2) I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender my men while they still have the means to resist.

3) If I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

4) If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me, and will back them up in every way.

5) When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am bound to give only name, rank, service number, and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies, or harmful to their cause.

6) I will never forget that I am an American fighting man, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower, August, 1955.






Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

23 posted on 06/05/2012 7:00:54 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Good evening, Mac...*HUGS*...hope you are feeling another day better.

I am off for home, homework in hand.


24 posted on 06/05/2012 7:03:17 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

D-Day, 6th Of June--1944....
never forget the price that was paid so that people could be free from tyranny! Eleven months later the monster, Hitler, was dead!

25 posted on 06/05/2012 7:04:36 PM PDT by LUV W (This space reserved for heroes)
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To: Kathy in Alaska

Great thread, Kathy! Lots of hard work there and it shows! (((hugs)))


26 posted on 06/05/2012 7:06:14 PM PDT by LUV W (This space reserved for heroes)
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To: moonshot925

Wow! That’s a great map! Thanks for posting it!


27 posted on 06/05/2012 7:08:47 PM PDT by LUV W (This space reserved for heroes)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
Safe Journey, Kathy!



Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

28 posted on 06/05/2012 7:12:12 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


BAND OF BROTHERS

WORLD WAR II


Members of the 101st Airborne, June 7, 1944 at Ste.Marie du Mont, France

"This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say, "To-morrow is Saint Crispian."
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say, "These wounds I had on Crispin's day."

KOREA

Members of the "Chosin Few", 1st Marine Division, December 1950


"Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember with advantages
What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words,
Harry the King, Bedford, and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remembered."

VIETNAM

FMF Corpsman D. R. Howe treats the wounds of Pfc. D. A. Crum, "H" Company, 2nd Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, during Operation Hue City.


"We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition:
And gentlemen in England now a-bed
Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day."

AFGHANISTAN

Soldiers of the 101st Airborne Division in action, Afghanistan, 2011


"Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more,
Or close the wall up with our English dead.
In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility;
But when the blast of war blows in our ears,
Then imitate the action of the tiger;
Stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood,
Disguise fair nature with hard-favour'd rage;
Then lend the eye a terrible aspect;
Let it pry through the portage of the head
Like the brass cannon; let the brow o'erwhelm it
As fearfully as does a galled rock
O'erhang and jutty his confounded base,
Swill'd with the wild and wasteful ocean."
(Henry V, Act IV, Scene iii)


THE STRUGGLE AGAINST TYRANNY GOES ON,
AS IT HAS FROM TIMES IMMEMORIAL.
THE BAND OF BROTHERS STILL STANDS FAST IN THE BREACH!

They have our six!

Honor them for their Service and Sacrifice!





Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

29 posted on 06/05/2012 7:16:07 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


The Grey-Haired Brigade



They like to refer to us as senior citizens, old fogies, geezers, and in some cases dinosaurs. Some of us are "Baby Boomers" getting ready to retire. Others have been retired for some time. We walk a little slower these days and our eyes and hearing are not what they once were. We have worked hard, raised our children, worshiped our God and grown old together. Yes, we are the ones some refer to as being over the hill, and that is probably true. But before writing us off completely, there are a few things that need to be taken into consideration.

In school we studied English, history, math, and science which enabled us to lead America into the technological age. Most of us remember what outhouses were, many of us with firsthand experience. We remember the days of telephone party-lines, 25 cent gasoline, and milk and ice being delivered to our homes. For those of you who don't know what an icebox is, today they are electric and referred to as refrigerators. A few even remember when cars were started with a crank. Yes, we lived those days.

We are probably considered old fashioned and out-dated by many. But there are a few things you need to remember before completely writing us off. We won World War II, fought in Korea and Viet Nam . We can quote The Pledge of Allegiance, and know where to place our hand while doing so. We wore the uniform of our country with pride and lost many friends on the battlefield. We didn't fight for the Socialist States of America , we fought for the "Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave." We wore different uniforms but carried the same flag. We know the words to the Star Spangled Banner, America, and America the Beautiful by heart, and you may even see some tears running down our cheeks as we sing. We have lived what many of you have only read about in history books and we feel no obligation to apologize to anyone for America.

Yes, we are old and slow these days but rest assured, we have at least one good fight left in us. We have loved this country, fought for it, and died for it, and now we are going to save it. It is our country and nobody is going to take it away from us. We took oaths to defend America against all enemies, foreign and domestic, and that is an oath we plan to keep. There are those who want to destroy this land we love but, like our founders, there is no way we are going to remain silent.

It was mostly the young people of this nation who elected Obama and the Democratic Congress. You fell for the "Hope and Change" which in reality was nothing but "Hype and Lies." You have tasted socialism and seen evil face to face, and have found you don't like it after all. You make a lot of noise, but most are all too interested in their careers or "Climbing the Social Ladder" to be involved in such mundane things as patriotism and voting. Many of those who fell for the "Great Lie" in 2008 are now having buyer's remorse. With all the education we gave you, you didn't have sense enough to see through the lies and instead drank the 'Kool-Aid.' Now you're paying the price and complaining about it. No jobs, lost mortgages, higher taxes, and less freedom. This is what you voted for and this is what you got. We entrusted you with the Torch of Liberty and you traded it for a paycheck and a fancy house.

Well, don't worry youngsters, the Grey-Haired Brigade is here, and in 2012 we are going to take back our nation. We may drive a little slower than you would like but we get where we're going, and in 2012 we're going to the polls by the millions. This land does not belong to the man in the White House nor to the likes of Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid. It belongs to "We the People" and "We the People" plan to reclaim our land and our freedom. We hope this time you will do a better job of preserving it and passing it along to our grandchildren. So the next time you have the chance to say the Pledge of Allegiance, Stand up, put your hand over your heart, honor our country, and thank God for the old geezers of the "Grey-Haired Brigade."

Author, Anon. Grey-Haired Brigade Member

Footnote:

This is spot on. I am another Gray-Haired Geezer signing on. I will circulate this to other Gray-Haired Geezers all over this once great county. Can you feel the ground shaking??? It's not an earthquake, it is a STAMPEDE.

"In God We Trust"



Happy moments, praise God. Difficult moments, seek God. Quiet moments, worship God. Painful moments, trust God. Every moment, thank God.









Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

30 posted on 06/05/2012 7:35:02 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Love the grey-haired brigade.

I’m home, but it has taken me 15 minutes to get on FR.


31 posted on 06/05/2012 7:45:03 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: ConorMacNessa

32 posted on 06/05/2012 7:50:24 PM PDT by BIGLOOK
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To: ConorMacNessa

Beautiful post, Conor! :)


33 posted on 06/05/2012 7:53:11 PM PDT by LUV W (This space reserved for heroes)
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To: Kathy in Alaska
The Grey-Haired Brigade salutes the Vets of D-Day Normandy and all the other members of the "Greatest Generation." The Grey-Haired Brigade is not only members of my generation - it is honored to count among its members Vets of the Korean War and of WWII. They showed us the way as we must show the way to those coming up now.

The generation now serving in all branches of the Armed Forces has done us old mossbacks proud.

God Bless them all! American Veterans of all wars! Guarantors of Freedom!



Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

34 posted on 06/05/2012 7:56:49 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: BIGLOOK
Good evening, Brother! I'm fading fast. The boss monkeys have jacked our hours up again - we're on seven days - dark to dark. Tattoo will play shortly. I have a lung scan tomorrow - will let you know what the result is when I have it.

I hope everything is going well with you. Keep the Faith - we soldier on!



Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

35 posted on 06/05/2012 8:04:52 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe; BIGLOOK; alfa6; EsmeraldaA; SandRat; mylife; TMSuchman; PROCON; ...


GOD BLESS AND PROTECT OUR TROOPS!




Tattoo
(Click)


Must retire – the 0500 Reveille approaches relentlessly – the bugler already mounts the parapet. Will chat with you all on the morrow.

Good night, God bless you, and God bless the United States of America!

Godspeed our Troops around the Globe – especially those in harm’s way – by virtue of their service and sacrifice we continue to live in Freedom!









Nos genuflectitur ad non princeps sed Princeps Pacem!

Listen, O isles, unto me; and hearken, ye people, from far; The LORD hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name. (Isaiah 49:1 KJV)

36 posted on 06/05/2012 8:13:00 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: All

The National D-Day Memorial, Bedford, VA

More memorial stuff to look at....


37 posted on 06/05/2012 8:13:23 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: ConorMacNessa
God Bless you good, Mac. Good night and rest well. Thanks for helping honor our troops, past and present. Thank you for your service to our country.


38 posted on 06/05/2012 8:17:20 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

Freep mail me to be on or off the Daily Bread ping list


A Better Place

June 6, 2012

When my friend Marci’s father-in-law passed away, she stopped making his favorite dessert: pineapple salad. One day, her little boy asked why she no longer served it. She replied, “It reminds me of Papa, and it makes me sad; Papa really liked that dessert.” Her son replied in a chipper tone, “Not better than heaven!”

That little boy had the right idea. Heaven is a much better place. Remembering this can help ease our sadness when things on earth trigger memories of believing loved ones who have passed away. Our friends and family who have heavenly addresses are much happier there because:

Heaven is God’s home. God’s followers will enjoy His presence for all eternity (Rev. 21:3-4).

Heaven is comfortable in every way. Heaven’s residents will never be sick or upset (21:4), hungry or thirsty (7:16).

Heaven is a beautiful place. A “clear as crystal” river will flow from God’s throne (22:1), and God Himself will give heaven its light (22:5).

Do things in this world sometimes remind you of believers who have moved on to the next world? If so, it’s comforting to think that they are now enjoying heaven—a better place by far.

If God has made this world so fair,
Where sin and death abound,
How beautiful beyond compare
Will paradise be found! —Montgomery
The pleasures of earth cannot be compared to the joys of heaven.

Read: Revelation 21:4-11

God Himself will be with them and be their God. —Revelation 21:3
Bible in a Year:
Psalms 37-39


39 posted on 06/05/2012 8:18:19 PM PDT by The Mayor ("If you can't make them see the light, let them feel the heat" — Ronald Reagan)
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To: ConorMacNessa

Rest well and rest easy, brother. See you ngay mai.


40 posted on 06/05/2012 8:59:14 PM PDT by BIGLOOK
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To: The Mayor

Good evening, Mayor, and thanks for today’s sustenance for body and soul. ((HUGS))

I’m following the Scott Walker thread....looks to be a clean sweep for the R’s. I love it!! All that money, and all that cheating, and all those shenanigans....thanks to the unions and all their supporting minions for adding a lot of money to Wisconsin’s economy.


41 posted on 06/05/2012 9:05:44 PM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

Huge win for the TEA Party and sets a national mandate!!
Lots of people worked very hard against the forces of evil.


42 posted on 06/05/2012 9:31:45 PM PDT by The Mayor ("If you can't make them see the light, let them feel the heat" — Ronald Reagan)
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To: Kathy in Alaska

Hi Kathy! ((HUGS!!)) Thank you!


43 posted on 06/05/2012 9:39:09 PM PDT by wjcsux ("In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act." - George Orwell)
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To: Kathy in Alaska

It’s been almost eight years since my father, an infantryman with the 28th Division, passed on. The 28th was originally slated to land on D-Day, but plans changed and he didn’t land in France until the 22nd of July. What they missed in Normandy they made up for later in the Hurtgen forest and during the “Bulge”.

While he lived, WWII was more then history to me, it was right there in the man that raised me. As time takes those veterans from us, the story of that epic war is becoming books and monuments rather than living memory, and it pains me to see how little some of the young kids know about WWII.

My children and I read your first post to this thread, and I read them Ike’s letter out loud. I told them that when I was their age, WWII was “Dad’s war” to me, just like OIF is “Dad’s war” to them. It’s good for them to see something online that remembers WWII, it makes it more immediate to them than their old man talking about his old man back in the old days.

That somebody else takes the time to remember and post a thread like this means a lot to me because it makes an impression on the boys.

Thanks for posting that.


44 posted on 06/05/2012 9:43:18 PM PDT by M1911A1
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To: ConorMacNessa

A year ago in February Lt. Leonard “Bud’’ Lomell, 2nd. Ranger Battalion , who scaled Pointe Du Hoc passed away. He lived here in Pt. Pleasant NJ, a lawyer by profession and a well known local fixture. I never had the honor of meeting him but because of him and the men of his generation I, we, live in the freedom we do. Thank you Lt. Lomell. Thank you for my freedom.


45 posted on 06/05/2012 10:46:58 PM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: M1911A1
Good evening/morning, M1911A1...((HUGS))...the boys must really be growing up...you almost have a teenager.

We thank your Dad for his service to our country, and to you for your service.


46 posted on 06/06/2012 12:37:50 AM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: wjcsux

Good morning, wjcsux...((HUGS))...love the news from Wisconsin!


47 posted on 06/06/2012 12:43:21 AM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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To: Kathy in Alaska

I knew a guy through church a few years ago and was getting to know him - was at his small nursing home room with his wife.

I noticed his tattoo and said “Oh - you were in the Navy!”

“Yes”

“WW II obviously?”

“Yes”

“My dad was on a minesweeper in the Pacific, what sort of ship were you on?”

“I drove a Higgin’s boat”

It was then that his wife piped up and said

“Harry was at Normandy on D-Day.”

I got up, shook his hand, said thank you with a tear in my eye, and then turned the conversation to other things. But the rest of the time that I would meet with them I was always in awe of what he did, and what he had gone through. Thank God for these boys turned quickly into men.


48 posted on 06/06/2012 1:26:08 AM PDT by 21twelve
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To: ConorMacNessa

Thank you for Reagan’s speech. So many times I see things like that with a lot of WORDS and just pass them by. But that is an easy read - so moving, so true, and so full of history and perhaps prophecy. I recall hearing it and reading it over the years, and it brings a real sense of pride - and hope.


49 posted on 06/06/2012 1:33:48 AM PDT by 21twelve
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To: blackie; E.G.C.; Arrowhead1952; ConorMacNessa; Allegra; Mrs.Nooseman; beachn4fun; Jet Jaguar; ...



50 posted on 06/06/2012 2:03:25 AM PDT by Kathy in Alaska ((~RIP Brian...the Coast Guard lost a good one.~))
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