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The $5 Billion Camo Snafu (Army retiring ACU)
The Daily ^ | June 24, 2012 | Erik German

Posted on 06/25/2012 4:53:08 PM PDT by JerseyanExile

The Army is changing clothes.

Over the next year, America’s largest fighting force is swapping its camouflage pattern. The move is a quiet admission that the last uniform — a pixelated design that debuted in 2004 at a cost of $5 billion — was a colossal mistake.

Soldiers have roundly criticized the gray-green uniform for standing out almost everywhere it’s been worn. Industry insiders have called the financial mess surrounding the pattern a “fiasco.”

As Army researchers work furiously on a newer, better camouflage, it’s natural to ask what went wrong and how they’ll avoid the same missteps this time around. In a candid interview with The Daily, several of those researchers said Army brass interfered in the selection process during the last round, letting looks and politics get in the way of science.

“It got into political hands before the soldiers ever got the uniforms,” said Cheryl Stewardson, a textile technologist at the Army research center in Natick, Mass., where most of the armed forces camouflage patterns are made.

The researchers say that science is carrying the day this time, as they run four patterns through a rigorous battery of tests. The goal is to give soldiers different patterns suitable for different environments, plus a single neutral pattern — matching the whole family — to be used on more expensive body armor and other gear. The selection will involve hundreds of computer trials as well on-the-ground testing at half a dozen locations around the world.

But until the new pattern is put in the field — a move that’s still a year or more away — soldiers in Afghanistan have been given a temporary fix: a greenish, blended replacement called MultiCam. The changeover came only after several non-commissioned officers complained to late Pennsylvania Rep. John Murtha, and he took up the cause in 2009. Outside of Afghanistan, the rest of the Army is still stuck with the gray Universal Camouflage Pattern, or UCP. And some soldiers truly hate it.

“Essentially, the Army designed a universal uniform that universally failed in every environment,” said an Army specialist who served two tours in Iraq, wearing UCP in Baghdad and the deserts outside Basra. “The only time I have ever seen it work well was in a gravel pit.”

The specialist asked that his name be withheld because he wasn’t authorized to speak to the press.

“As a cavalry scout, it is my job to stay hidden. Wearing a uniform that stands out this badly makes it hard to do our job effectively,” he said. “If we can see our own guys across a distance because of it, then so can our enemy.”

The fact that the government spent $5 billion on a camouflage design that actually made its soldiers more visible — and then took eight years to correct the problem — has also left people in the camouflage industry incensed. The total cost comes from the Army itself and includes the price of developing the pattern and producing it for the entire service branch.

“You’ve got to look back and say what a huge waste of money that was,” said Lawrence Holsworth, marketing director of a camouflage company called Hyde Definition and the editor of Strike-Hold!, a website that tracks military gear. “UCP was such a fiasco.”

The Army’s camouflage researchers say the story of the universal pattern’s origins begins when they helped develop a similarly pixilated camouflage now worn by the Marine Corps. That pattern, known as MARPAT, first appeared in 2002 after being selected from among dozens of candidates and receiving plenty of input from Marines on the ground at the sniper school in Quantico, Va. The Marines even found one of the baseline colors themselves, an earth tone now called Coyote Brown.

“They went to Home Depot, looked at paint swatches, and said, ‘We want that color,’ ” said Anabelle Dugas, a textile technologist at Natick who helped develop the pattern. That particular hue, she added, was part of a paint series then sold by Ralph Lauren.

Around the same time, the Army was on the hunt for a new camouflage pattern that could solve glaring logistical problem on the ground in Iraq. Without enough desert-specific gear to go around, soldiers were going to war in three-color desert fatigues but strapping dark green vests and gear harness over their chests. At rifle distances, the problem posed by the dark gear over light clothing was as obvious as it was distressing.

Kristine Isherwood, a mechanical engineer on Natick’s camouflage team, said simply, “It shows where to shoot.”

The Army researchers rushed to put new camouflages to the test — several in-house designs and a precursor of MultiCam developed by an outside company. The plan was to spend two years testing patterns and color schemes from different angles and distances and in different environments. The Army published results of the trials in 2004, declaring a tan, brushstroke pattern called Desert Brush the winner — but that design never saw the light of day.

The problem, the researchers said, was an oddly named branch of the Army in charge of equipping soldiers with gear — Program Executive Office Soldier — had suddenly ordered Natick’s camouflage team to pick a pattern long before trials were finished.

“They jumped the gun,” said James Fairneny, an electrical engineer on Natick’s camouflage team.

Researchers said they received a puzzling order: Take the winning colors and create a pixilated pattern. Researchers were ordered to “basically put it in the Marine Corps pattern,” Fairneny said.

For a decision that could ultimately affect more than a million soldiers in the Army, reserves and National Guard, the sudden shift from Program Executive Office Soldier was a head-scratcher. The consensus among the researchers was the Army brass had watched the Marine Corps don their new uniforms and caught a case of pixilated camouflage envy.

“It was trendy,” Stewardson said. “If it’s good enough for the Marines, why shouldn’t the Army have that same cool new look?”

The brigadier general ultimately responsible for the decision, James Moran, who retired from the Army after leaving Program Executive Office Soldier, has not responded to messages seeking comment.

It’s worth noting that, flawed as it was, the universal pattern did solve the problem of mismatched gear, said Eric Graves, editor of the military gear publication Soldier Systems Daily, adding that the pattern also gave soldiers a new-looking uniform that clearly identified the Army brand.

“Brand identity trumped camouflage utility,” Graves said. “That’s what this really comes down to: ‘We can’t allow the Marine Corps to look more cool than the Army.’ ”



TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government
KEYWORDS: camo; camouflage; defenseprocurement; dod; jamesmoran; nationaldefense; uniform; usarmy; usmilitary
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To be fair, it isn't all the fault of the Army. From what I've heard, they were originally interested in MARPAT. However, the Marine Corp wanted a unique design that set them apart from the Army, so they patented it and refused to share. They even went to the length of embedding Marine logos into the design to prevent another service from using it.

These inter-service rivalries are getting just absurd.

1 posted on 06/25/2012 4:53:23 PM PDT by JerseyanExile
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To: JerseyanExile

I was under the impression that the current Army cammy color was an effort to provide concealment for troops operating in a grey urban environment and was a reaction to fighting in the cities of Iraq with an abundance of concrete and cinder block. It seemed to me an effective scheme for that sort of environment even if it wasn’t appropriate in the mountains of A’stan.


2 posted on 06/25/2012 5:05:01 PM PDT by xkaydet65
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To: JerseyanExile
Multicam is a very effective pattern. More than just color, it incorporates a lot of the effects found in nature in mammal and bird patterns. Most conventional military camouflage breaks up outlines on a generally two dimensional plane. Multicam, while applied on a 2D cloth surface, like any other pattern, is designed to incorporate the appearance of depth as well.

Because of the backing shades under the pattern, it will reflect, to a certain degree the colors and shadows of the surrounding environment, appearing "greener" in a vegetated environ, "browner" in a desert background, and "grayer" in a winter or urban setting...


3 posted on 06/25/2012 5:05:39 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Joe 6-pack

They should talk to the folks at Mossy Oak.


4 posted on 06/25/2012 5:12:31 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is, it is the only answer.)
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To: Lurker

If I’m not mistaken, the folks at Crye Precision did talk to other manufacturers in the development of Multicam. Years back, I remember reading something about the genesis of some of these newer patterns, and Mossy Oak was brought up. Mossy Oak is made for very specific environments, and is for concealment from animal eyes. Military patterns of course, need to be more generalized, and are made to deceive human eyes, hence the differences in the end product.


5 posted on 06/25/2012 5:20:40 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: JerseyanExile
Yep, stands out a mile away. It's so bad, it would be better to wear nothing at all...


6 posted on 06/25/2012 5:27:57 PM PDT by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: Joe 6-pack

You are correct of course. But I think the folks at MO could learn to fool human eyes too.


7 posted on 06/25/2012 5:29:45 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is, it is the only answer.)
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To: Talisker


8 posted on 06/25/2012 5:36:01 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Chode

She wrecked....the air bags deployed!


9 posted on 06/25/2012 5:38:20 PM PDT by nascarnation
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To: JerseyanExile
“They [the Marines] went to Home Depot, looked at paint swatches, and said, ‘We want that color,’ ” said Anabelle Dugas, a textile technologist at Natick who helped develop the pattern. That particular hue, she added, was part of a paint series then sold by Ralph Lauren.

Oh, dear. The Marines, in Ralph Lauren designer clothing. That little tidbit will probably get me punched out tonight. BTT.

10 posted on 06/25/2012 5:45:29 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: JerseyanExile
How Not To Be Seen
11 posted on 06/25/2012 5:47:28 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
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To: nascarnation
yup... Hollie has a hell of a st of lungs on her
12 posted on 06/25/2012 5:48:51 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: JerseyanExile
Don't blame Marines. Every US service branch has their own unique camouflage pattern. They all wanted it that way.

The curious USAF pattern is sort of a throwback to Vietnam-era 'Tiger Stripe' that MACV-SOG troops and some USAF officers had custom tailored for themselves while on on R&R in Thailand, then they actually used it in combat and found out that it didn't blend into any environment at all. The USAF ought to go back to wearing flat olive drab with shiny white laced boots and baseball caps like God wanted them to have back in the 60s through the 80s.

The new USN 'blue wave' camo is just idiotic. I bet it would be perfect camouflage for a doomed sailor who falls overboard into the sea at night. What were they thinking?

USMC's MARPAT is the only one that works as intended. The pixelation tricks the brain no matter what size object you put it on. Only downside is that the USMC pretty much looks from a distance like a dead ringer for the Waffen SS when fully geared up in it. That's not cool. Even if there are those who think it's cool, it's still not cool.

13 posted on 06/25/2012 6:00:02 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: JerseyanExile

The article was not too clear in pointing out the money trail. Names of the natural individuals owning or directing the companies bidding, selecting and manufacturing the clothing.


14 posted on 06/25/2012 6:10:24 PM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: JerseyanExile

They should try this pattern. Comes in several color combinations and suitable for nearly every environment and mighty effective, too.

http://www.thehistorybunker.co.uk/acatalog/planetreesmockautumn.jpg


15 posted on 06/25/2012 6:15:08 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: The KG9 Kid
a dead ringer for the Waffen SS when fully geared up

I thought their BDUs were black w/ silver piping & black 'dice box' boots. At least tank crews were so attired.

Regards,
GtG

16 posted on 06/25/2012 6:25:08 PM PDT by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: JerseyanExile

Now let’s get after the Air Force “blue” camoflage.

Just where and what does that camoflage?


17 posted on 06/25/2012 6:37:33 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It! Those who truly support our troops pray for their victory!)
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray
I thought their BDUs were black w/ silver piping & black 'dice box' boots. At least tank crews were so attired.

See post 15 for an example of a Waffen SS pattern.

18 posted on 06/25/2012 6:38:27 PM PDT by cayuga (The next Crusade will be a war of annihilation.)
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray
SS Leopard pattern...

19 posted on 06/25/2012 6:44:08 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Talisker

Not guilty!


20 posted on 06/25/2012 6:48:51 PM PDT by Thane_Banquo (Support hate crime laws: Because some victims are more equal than others.)
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To: JerseyanExile; Lazamataz; Slings and Arrows; mikrofon; Charles Henrickson

Here's what I wear when I go clubbin'.

That's me there in the middle.

21 posted on 06/25/2012 6:56:42 PM PDT by martin_fierro (How Not To Be Seen)
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To: JerseyanExile
I disagree. This would be true if there was a one-size-fits-all camo design, but little differences like this have always sparked rivalry in the military.

Even the Navy tried to come up with something to spark that rivalry, which was stupid of course. Battleship Gray is a well-defined color. Make all Navy uniforms that color and the enemy would simply see a light-gray silhouette on the horizon and shoot at it. How dumb is that? The enemy would never be able to see the enlisted pukes cowering on decks....

Side note: I was one of ninety guys graduating from boot camp on the day Kennedy was shot. Upon hearing the news, 30 of them wanted a discharge to join the Army. "If there is going to be shooting, I want a rifle!"

30 of them wanted a complete discharge. "I only enlisted in the Navy because chicks dig the uniform!"

The rest of us said pretty much said, "Get me the hell out to the fleet. If there is going to be a war, that is exactly what I joined for!"

Of course I went into submarines. Hard to see the color of your uniform when it is hundreds of feet under the surface....

22 posted on 06/25/2012 6:57:31 PM PDT by neversweat (40 years and I still miss it!)
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To: xzins
Now let’s get after the Air Force “blue” camoflage.>p> Just where and what does that camoflage? Good question. In my day (1977-81) we wore OD fatigues with white on blue name tapes & rank stripes. Just before I got out we switched to subdued OD name tapes.

The new USAF camo looks like it is meant to look "cool" in the office.


23 posted on 06/25/2012 7:00:46 PM PDT by Yo-Yo
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To: JerseyanExile

“it’s natural to ask what went wrong and how they’ll avoid the same missteps this time around. “

No, they won’t. Incompetent management is never fixed, just promoted and things gets worse.


24 posted on 06/25/2012 7:06:38 PM PDT by CodeToad (Homosexuals are homophobes. They insist on being called 'gay' instead.)
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To: martin_fierro
First, lol, that was funny!

Second, for the new homosexual military, it's FABULOUS!!!


25 posted on 06/25/2012 7:14:08 PM PDT by CodeToad (Homosexuals are homophobes. They insist on being called 'gay' instead.)
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To: Yo-Yo
Those pictures are from the test uniform. The actual unform was looks like this:


26 posted on 06/25/2012 7:17:50 PM PDT by Fundamentally Fair (Pictionary at the Rorschach's tonight!)
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To: martin_fierro

Zer0: “Oooh, put that on ALL my soldier boys! It looks FABULOUS!”


27 posted on 06/25/2012 7:20:38 PM PDT by Slings and Arrows (You can't have Ingsoc without an Emmanuel Goldstein.)
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To: Fundamentally Fair

Thanks for the correction. At least they toned down the blue.


28 posted on 06/25/2012 7:24:49 PM PDT by Yo-Yo
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To: JerseyanExile

They should try the time-tested “Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake” pattern. Looks pixelated, looks cool, and is darn effective even at close range.


29 posted on 06/25/2012 7:34:19 PM PDT by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge)
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To: jazusamo; Girlene; 4woodenboats; Grimmy; xzins; smoothsailing; lilycicero; bigheadfred; ...
(( ping ))
This story is worth the full read. Here are some excerpts:

The Army’s camouflage researchers say the story of the universal pattern’s origins begins when they helped develop a similarly pixilated camouflage now worn by the Marine Corps. That pattern, known as MARPAT, first appeared in 2002 after being selected from among dozens of candidates and receiving plenty of input from Marines on the ground at the sniper school in Quantico, Va. The Marines even found one of the baseline colors themselves, an earth tone now called Coyote Brown.

The problem, the researchers said, was an oddly named branch of the Army in charge of equipping soldiers with gear — Program Executive Office Soldier — had suddenly ordered Natick’s camouflage team to pick a pattern long before trials were finished.

“They jumped the gun,” said James Fairneny, an electrical engineer on Natick’s camouflage team. Researchers said they received a puzzling order: Take the winning colors and create a pixilated pattern. Researchers were ordered to “basically put it in the Marine Corps pattern,” Fairneny said.

The consensus among the researchers was the Army brass had watched the Marine Corps don their new uniforms and caught a case of pixilated camouflage envy.

“It was trendy,” Stewardson said. “If it’s good enough for the Marines, why shouldn’t the Army have that same cool new look?”

“Brand identity trumped camouflage utility,” Graves said. “That’s what this really comes down to: ‘We can’t allow the Marine Corps to look more cool than the Army.’ ”

30 posted on 06/25/2012 7:35:12 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard
Camo Junior Birddog


31 posted on 06/25/2012 8:03:16 PM PDT by smoothsailing (Congrats to John Murtha! He hasn't slandered a Marine in over two years now!!!)
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To: JerseyanExile

Mossy Oak could solve this problem for less than 5 billion I bet


32 posted on 06/25/2012 8:13:07 PM PDT by Figment
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To: Yo-Yo

The USAF camo might hide someone who falls out of a plane at 30,000’ on a sunny day.

Being old enough to have briefly worn the pickle fatigues, I think the USAF ought to go back to that...maybe in gray, so that maintainers can lie down on concrete and disappear from view!


33 posted on 06/25/2012 8:19:22 PM PDT by Mr Rogers (A conservative can't please a liberal unless he jumps in front of a bus or off of a cliff)
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To: The KG9 Kid
The new USN 'blue wave' camo is just idiotic. I bet it would be perfect camouflage for a doomed sailor who falls overboard into the sea at night. What were they thinking?

They were thinking "CONTRACTS" for friends most likely. Lot's of money for friends to make in a complete service uniform change over. You're right the change to Blue Camo's for a working uniform it was just plain dumb and completely dysfunctional for locating a man overboard in the water.

It equals or exceeds the Naval uniform change of the Dress Blues to a the dysfunctional Chief's style suit worn by junior enlisted in the mid to late 70's. I do know for a fact the Navy finally saw the mistake & went back to the traditional Cracker Jacks in about late 1979. I had to buy them before I could get out in late 1980.

A functional working uniform change could have simply been a pair of light weight solid Navy Blue {dark} Coveralls that both Dickies and Walls makes. A lot of guys on ship wore coveralls when working anyway. But then again the traditional Dungarees also were a part of water survival in the event of man overboard.

34 posted on 06/25/2012 8:30:55 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

The Waffen SS was te first major military force to go with camo, back in WW II.Since all the major Waffen SS units started the war as motorized infantry, they didn’t need the black panzer uniform [worn by the Army since 1939], until 1942, when they were upgraded to Panzer divisions [at least the 1st SS, 2d SS, 3d SS, 5th SS, 9th SS, 10th SS and 12th SS]. But SS Mountain Divisions [7th SS], Cavalry Divisions [8th SS, 23d SS], and Panzer Grenadier Divisions [e.g 15th SS, 16th SS, 17th SS], as well as the infantry/grenadier component of Pz. Divs. still wore the camo.


35 posted on 06/25/2012 8:35:42 PM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: Gandalf_The_Gray

Panzer crews all wore the same uniform, no matter if they were SS or regular German army.


36 posted on 06/25/2012 9:24:04 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: Chode

That always was a beautiful pattern. Take that and put LBE on it, add the helmet and you’d think we’d become the Whermacht!

All the way down to how we identify our vehicles....pure WWII german.

No one admits it or knows it.


37 posted on 06/25/2012 9:30:45 PM PDT by panzerkamphwageneinz
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To: cva66snipe

I read somewhere that the enlisted sailor coming out of NTC has something like five uniforms issued, with multiple duplicate items that are part of their own uniform set.

They get the A uniform, B uniform, some other kind of B uniform, the dungarees, cracker jacks, and the new utilities.

I could be wrong about the types, but I’d read it was not so long ago that new sailors just had two sea bags of uniforms, and a suit bag. Maybe it’s changed now.


38 posted on 06/25/2012 9:39:06 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: cva66snipe

I read somewhere that the enlisted sailor coming out of NTC has something like five uniforms issued, with multiple duplicate items that are part of their own uniform set.

They get the A uniform, B uniform, some other kind of B uniform, the dungarees, cracker jacks, and the new utilities.

I could be wrong about the types, but I’d read it was not so long ago that new sailors just had two sea bags of uniforms, and a suit bag. Maybe it’s changed now.


39 posted on 06/25/2012 10:04:26 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: The KG9 Kid

USMC’s MARPAT is the only one that works as intended.


Duh. Jarheads know what works in the bush. My first set of Camo Utilities in the Corps was the original Vietnam pattern 5 color when they brought them back in ‘77. Worked better than anything except Tiger Stripes, were very comfortable and would dry out faster than anything else. I could go from soaking wet to done dry in about half a hour of humpin’. Downside was they wore out very quickly, ripstop or not.

The pixelation tricks the brain no matter what size object you put it on. Only downside is that the USMC pretty much looks from a distance like a dead ringer for the Waffen SS when fully geared up in it. That’s not cool. Even if there are those who think it’s cool, it’s still not cool.


Who cares about cool? What keeps you’re a$$ subdued in combat is cool. If it resembles old Waffen SS patterns, So f*kin’ what. MarPatt works.


40 posted on 06/25/2012 11:12:39 PM PDT by 98ZJ USMC
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To: The KG9 Kid

I’m trying to remember the basics in my sea bag {only one was issued} Three pairs of Dungarees {you had two styles either light blue jeans type or dark blue work pants}, three work shirts, Chief type dress blues, P-Coat, dern itchy wool sweater, dress shoes, Boondockers, belt, and a work and dress uniform cover. The blues were nearly impossible to stow on ship as they didn’t fit the lockers. You couldn’t wear them around LOX operations either. I remember a warning coming out about that on some ship someone stowed their blues in there and they went up like a torch while he was wearing them. It wasn’t scuttlebutt it was an offical warning.


41 posted on 06/25/2012 11:22:25 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: JerseyanExile
However, the Marine Corp wanted a unique design that set them apart from the Army, so they patented it and refused to share.

I guess the USMC didn't get the memo that government organizations and institutions, including the military, can't patent items bought and paid for with taxpayer funds. It's all public domain, including unit names and logos.

42 posted on 06/26/2012 3:35:37 AM PDT by Timber Rattler (Just say NO! to RINOS and the GOP-E)
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To: cva66snipe
A lot of guys on ship wore coveralls when working anyway.

I saw those in use aboard a nuclear fast-attack that I rode for two or three days in 1970, that had just come back from the Barents and was ordered to AUTEC Andros (Tongue of the Ocean) for torpedo tests. The officers and enlisted all wore an ultramarine-blue one-piece coverall with iirc canvas shoes of the same color, with white-trimmed gum soles. Scary-smart guys, they got a Presidential Unit Citation on that cruise, and on another back to the Barents the next year. Great people.

43 posted on 06/26/2012 4:28:12 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: The KG9 Kid
Only downside is that the USMC pretty much looks from a distance like a dead ringer for the Waffen SS when fully geared up in it. That's not cool.

Perhaps all that means, is that the German camouflage experts really knew what they were doing, and gravitated toward patterns that worked for them for the same reasons MARPAT works for the USMC.

44 posted on 06/26/2012 4:36:25 AM PDT by lentulusgracchus
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To: The KG9 Kid

Couldn’t agree more...
We are retired and I saw the Navy for the first time way after it was adopted.
I thought they were Belgian Navy personnel...sheesh.
Another bone-headed decision by the “new” leadership...up there with repealing DADT.


45 posted on 06/26/2012 4:38:42 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: panzerkamphwageneinz
yup, with the new helmets we'd look damn close...
46 posted on 06/26/2012 4:43:32 AM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: cva66snipe

When I was in, the Os were switched to a God-awful combo of trop white shirts and black slacks (or skirt) for the women. I think Chiefs had that option, too.
We all looked like airline pilots...stupid.
My favorite female O uniform was the seer-sucker, light blue two-piece left over from WWII...
Fit so well that, for me, the under “layer” was optional in hot weather...
It was a loooooooong time ago....


47 posted on 06/26/2012 4:47:04 AM PDT by matginzac
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To: Timber Rattler
I guess the USMC didn't get the memo that government organizations and institutions, including the military, can't patent items bought and paid for with taxpayer funds. It's all public domain, including unit names and logos.

The US government operates under Executive Order 10096 in terms of patent rights, and has done so (in augmented form) since 1950. Section 1 has been unchanged in that time;

1. The following basic policy is established for all Government agencies with respect to inventions hereafter made by any Government employee: (a) The Government shall obtain the entire right, title and interest in and to all inventions made by any Government employee (1) during working hours, or (2) with a contribution by the Government of facilities, equipment, materials, funds, or information, or of time or services of other Government employees on official duty, or (3) which bear a direct relation to or are made in consequence of the official duties of the inventor.
48 posted on 06/26/2012 4:53:14 AM PDT by Renderofveils (My loathings are simple: stupidity, oppression, crime, cruelty, soft music. - Nabokov)
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To: Renderofveils

Another damned Executive Order-—it wouldn’t hold up in court under current patent, trademark, and copyright law if anyone ever bothered to challenge it.


49 posted on 06/26/2012 4:57:07 AM PDT by Timber Rattler (Just say NO! to RINOS and the GOP-E)
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To: Timber Rattler
Another damned Executive Order-—it wouldn’t hold up in court under current patent, trademark, and copyright law if anyone ever bothered to challenge it.

It has been challenged. Repeatedly. If you want to know how that works (and be a little sick to your stomach...) here you go.
50 posted on 06/26/2012 5:06:37 AM PDT by Renderofveils (My loathings are simple: stupidity, oppression, crime, cruelty, soft music. - Nabokov)
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