Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

College grads learning good jobs hard to find now (employers note "skill gap")
San Antonio Express News ^ | July 1, 2012 | Tracy Idell Hamilton and Beth Brown

Posted on 07/01/2012 3:24:51 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife

Andi Meuth earned a history degree from Texas A&M in May and has applied for 150 jobs, so far with no luck.

Jon Ancira graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology last year, but can't find work that uses his degree. After six months of searching, the 26-year-old did finally land a job — at a bank.

Alex Ricard, 21, is grateful to be using his electronic media degree from Texas State at a social media startup company, but it's an unpaid internship.

He says he's sent out three to five resumes a week for the past two months, with almost no response from prospective employers. When he does hear back, he says, it's most often that he doesn't have enough experience.

While the particulars for each graduate are different, the overarching narrative has become familiar.

Up to half of all recent college grads are jobless or underemployed, doing low-wage work outside their chosen fields, according to a widely reported analysis this spring by the Associated Press.

These young women and men still have high expectations — as do their parents — that a college degree will pay off, despite rising tuition and the resulting debt.

But increasingly, say economists and workforce experts, there is a mismatch in today's job market between graduates' skills and those needed in the fastest-growing career fields.

The recession changed the economy permanently, economists say. In this largely jobless recovery, millions of mid- and entry-level positions are gone, the work now automated.

Many of those with college degrees who do find jobs can expect lower salaries and reduced earning potential over their working lives. Rising debt — the average graduate carries about $25,000 in loans — can push the often-necessary advanced degree out of reach.

Locally, the unemployment rate among 20- to 24-year-olds has been about twice as high as the overall rate.

Psych degree overload

Ricard still holds out hope that his degree will eventually lead to a job, given the increased importance of social media and digital technology, but he has his limits: August.

“If I haven't found something by then,” he said, “even though I'd like to think my days of fast-food jobs are behind me, it becomes less about the job I want and more about the job I need at that point.”

Not all graduates face such dire straits. Those with in-demand degrees in areas such as engineering, information technology and nursing enjoy much brighter job prospects.

Kevin Davis, who earned an electrical engineering degree from the University of Texas at Austin, had three job offers before he graduated in May. He took a job with Toshiba in Houston.

John Hollman will graduate from Austin Community College in December with a two-year associate degree in nursing. The San Antonio native already has two job offers, one from his current employer of nine years, Texas Oncology.

But employers and workforce agencies say the labor market is suffering from a jobs-skills mismatch.

Psychology, for example, is the third-most-popular four-year degree in Texas and one of the fastest growing, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, a public agency that works to bring people and jobs together.

Problem is, there's almost no demand at that level, said Eva Esquivel, communications manager with the agency.

More than 5,000 people graduated from Texas colleges and universities with bachelor's degrees in psychology in 2010, she said, to compete for four job openings in the field, with an annual salary of $22,000.

“That's not even enough to pay student loans back,” Esquivel said. Most psychology jobs require a higher-level degree — and there still aren't many positions available.

Ancira, who saw some of his psychology research published while studying at Northwest Vista, one of the Alamo Colleges, said he found fewer research opportunities after transferring to UT.

Disenchanted, he looked into changing majors or getting an advanced degree, but the burden of $36,000 in student loans put him off.

Meuth, who lives in San Antonio, said she knew the job market for history majors without a master's degree or teaching certification was limited but decided to go for a major she was passionate about, even in a slumping economy. She wants to work in a museum eventually, which requires a master's, but is putting it off for now to avoid taking out any loans.

Conversely, Texas colleges graduated far fewer engineers than psychology majors in 2010 — just 271 petroleum engineers, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, and demand far outstrips supply, especially as the Eagle Ford Shale continues to boom.

Starting pay for petroleum engineers averages $85,000, Esquivel said. For the 405 chemical engineers who graduated in 2010, it's about $60,000.

Skills in short supply

Chris Nielsen, president and CEO of Toyota Motor Manufacturing in San Antonio, said the company has struggled to fill engineering positions and points to the healthy starting salary as proof of the competitive nature of the field.

But perhaps more crucially, Nielsen said that in the six years the company has been building trucks in San Antonio, it's never been able to fill all its trade positions, or what it calls “skilled job” positions.

Those include maintaining assembly-line robots, which Nielson said requires training in programming, hydraulics and pneumatics.

These are good, career-track positions, he said, many that pay in the $60,000 range.

Toyota is hardly alone.

Manufacturers surveyed in the latest “Skills Gap” report from the Manufacturing Institute, an affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers, reported that roughly 5 percent of current jobs go unfilled because of a lack of qualified candidates. That's as many as 600,000 unfilled jobs — machinists, operators, craft workers, distributors, technicians and more — that manufacturers say hamper their ability to expand operations, drive innovation and improve productivity.

Those surveyed said the national education curriculum is not producing workers with the basic skills they need, and the trend is not likely to improve in the near term.

Tom Pauken, appointed to the Texas Workforce Commission by Gov. Rick Perry in 2008, has become a passionate advocate for greater vocational and technical training.

He laments what he calls a “one size fits all” approach to higher education, which assumes that everyone needs a four-year degree.

Those who do are often saddled with enormous debt and still can't find good jobs, he said. “Meanwhile, there is a shortfall of qualified applicants for those with skills training as welders, electricians, pipe fitters and machinists.”

Entry-level salaries for those jobs in the San Antonio area begin in the low- to-mid-$20,000 range, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, and rise to the upper $40,000s at the expert level.

In San Antonio, Alamo Colleges runs Alamo Academies, which aims to train high school juniors and seniors for skilled employment in fast-growing local industries, including aerospace, information technology and security, manufacturing and the health professions.

The academies, which are a partnership among the community college district, local industry and workforce agencies, also provide college credits, and expose students to occupations that require a college education. Students stay in their high schools, take about half their classes at the academy and participate in a paid internship in their chosen field.

After high school, graduates earn an average starting pay of more than $30,000 and will have earned a couple dozen college credits.

“I tell students they need to do career planning even before education planning,” said Esquivel, who travels a 12-county region talking to high school students about where job growth will occur in the coming years. “I wish more students would take advantage” of the information her agency has to offer.

Luisa Ramirez, the on-campus recruiting coordinator at the University of Texas at San Antonio, said she's seen an increase in freshmen who come to the career center seeking advice, rather than waiting until they're seniors.

“They've seen their parents go through the recession,” she said, “So they're more aware.”

Ancira said many recent graduates might be in for a rude awakening.

“You go to school thinking you're going to graduate and there's going to be a job in an office waiting for you,” he said, “but a few years into it, you realize that's not really going to happen.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government
KEYWORDS: economy; education; educon; educonomy; highereducation; jobs; marketability; univdegrees
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-240 next last

1 posted on 07/01/2012 3:25:04 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

History degree???? What the HELL would they be good for in the workplace?? NOTHING but be Mr. KnowitAll.


2 posted on 07/01/2012 3:29:52 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Oh well......

“Meuth, who lives in San Antonio, said she knew the job market for history majors without a master’s degree or teaching certification was limited but decided to go for a major she was passionate about, even in a slumping economy. She wants to work in a museum eventually, which requires a master’s, but is putting it off for now to avoid taking out any loans.”


3 posted on 07/01/2012 3:34:58 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Again, we see so many seeking the least common denominator (easy path) as a means to gain. Notice that the engineering grads have no issue finding a job?


4 posted on 07/01/2012 3:36:31 AM PDT by mazda77 (and I am a Native Texan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All

Andi Meuth is a recent Texas A&M grad and earned a history degree. Andi has been applying for many jobs, but hasn't managed to land a decent one yet. She applied at USAA recently and is hoping that one will pan out. Photo: San Antonio Express-News / SA


Andi Meuth displays her class ring from Texas A&M.....Photo: San Antonio Express-News / SA

5 posted on 07/01/2012 3:40:21 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: mazda77

Let’s emphasize this to kids once again....engineering of any type, science-related degrees, and medical degrees...will be professions that always have open doors. You might have to agree to move a state away or such....but these folks never have problems.

A degree in women’s studies? A degree in gourmet science? A degree in French literature? Well....you’d best hope that Subway has a manager opening somewhere and just take what you can get in times like this.


6 posted on 07/01/2012 3:41:07 AM PDT by pepsionice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

History majors are often fairly smart.

Now finding a job that ‘uses’ an undergraduate psychology degree, on the other hand...


7 posted on 07/01/2012 3:42:57 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: pepsionice

And NASA has become a “green” agency.

Obama and Holdren have been VERY busy cutting America down to size.


8 posted on 07/01/2012 3:43:34 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

The people I would hire the ones with unique skills needed for if and when Americans have to fight I will already have a crew.

I hire people, I pay heed to such things as shortwave operators, military backgrounds, gunsmithing and certain computer skills.

I have no place for the socialistic tripe fed wussies that openly admire socialism. I can tell on a job application to a good degree where a person stands.


9 posted on 07/01/2012 3:45:48 AM PDT by Eye of Unk (Is your state Obamacare free yet?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy
"History degree???? What the HELL would they be good for in the workplace?? NOTHING but be Mr. KnowitAll."

Do any of these young twits do any research at all into "where the jobs are" before settling on a career choice? Psychology?? History?? Basket-weaving??

10 posted on 07/01/2012 3:47:06 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 9YearLurker
Being "fairly smart" doesn't mean you can even do a retail job well.....and physcology degrees ENSURES you can;t!!
11 posted on 07/01/2012 3:48:54 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Wonder Warthog

No, and I blame the stupid PARENTS even more!!


12 posted on 07/01/2012 3:50:09 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
"Not all graduates face such dire straits. Those with in-demand degrees in areas such as engineering, information technology and nursing enjoy much brighter job prospects. ... Kevin Davis, who earned an electrical engineering degree from the University of Texas at Austin, had three job offers before he graduated in May. He took a job with Toshiba in Houston....John Hollman will graduate from Austin Community College in December with a two-year associate degree in nursing. The San Antonio native already has two job offers, ... Psychology, for example, is the third-most-popular four-year degree in Texas and one of the fastest growing, .... More than 5,000 people graduated from Texas colleges and universities with bachelor's degrees in psychology in 2010, she said, to compete for four job openings in the field, with an annual salary of $22,000. ... Conversely, Texas colleges graduated far fewer engineers than psychology majors in 2010 — just 271 petroleum engineers, according to Workforce Solutions Alamo, and demand far outstrips supply, especially as the Eagle Ford Shale continues to boom....Starting pay for petroleum engineers averages $85,000, Esquivel said. For the 405 chemical engineers who graduated in 2010, it's about $60,000."

Obtaining a degree that there would be some demand for (and an $85k starting salary) might require some work and spending a few weekends in the lab and library, and not spending weekends with drugs, alcohol and using those "free" contraceptives from Obama.

Proof positive that a college education can't make anyone use common sense.

13 posted on 07/01/2012 3:52:26 AM PDT by Sooth2222 ("Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of congress. But I repeat myself." M.Twain)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

ping


14 posted on 07/01/2012 3:55:56 AM PDT by rurgan (Sunset all laws at 4 years.China is destroying U.S. ability to manufacture,makes everything)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Wonder Warthog

Psych is totally worthless without a Master’s. With an M.A you could be a therapist.


15 posted on 07/01/2012 3:56:41 AM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

She needs to find work as a journalist! Hell, it took TWO of them just to write this article. (Sending 3 to 5 resumes a week? That’s it? Seriously? Wow....)


16 posted on 07/01/2012 4:05:46 AM PDT by LittleBillyInfidel (This tagline has been formatted to fit the screen. Some content has been edited.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LittleBillyInfidel
worthless people or generation

I worked at 10 years old cutting grass and saved 600.00 and I worked and saved for the next 40 plus years

Now I feel like a college grad now I should have spent every dime I made and more and they are going raised my "unearned income" at a higher rate? I think I remember the Bahama's having automatic citizenship if you buy a home there when Nicole Smith died.

They speak English and island life isn't that bad.

17 posted on 07/01/2012 4:17:09 AM PDT by scooby321 (h tones)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

The electronic media major should not be having problems, social media coordinator and manager positions are fairly plentiful here in NC, and we were hit hard and still have higher unemployment than TX. Of course, he should have been taking those unpaid internships during summers while still in school, that is if he couldn’t find even a menial paid position with an employer in his field to gain some exposure and make valuable contacts, referrals and at least a few genuine references. It doesn’t sound as if he did this. Is there no longer such a thing as a placement office? All this was common practice, at least up to my college years.

The psych major needs to be interviewing with HR departments and security firms, possibly police forces, anywhere the ability to assess and screen applicants or individuals granted access would be needed. There is a level of intuition to this, however, and no experience will again rise up and bite a job hunter, just as in the previous example. His school failed him if he wasn’t counseled to pursue every avenue of exposure in his chosen profession prior to graduation.

The history major, well, I hope her passion translates into working her butt off in order to find something other than a tour guide position at an historic attraction. There is interest in history as far as salable products, apparel, collectibles, even peculiar things like jigsaw puzzles (thinking of the local Heritage Puzzle Co., a division of Heritage Publishing, very nice stuff if you’re into historic lighthouses and such), so over time she could build her way into a viable business but would need to acquire a great deal of other knowledge in order to capitalize upon a love and knowledge of history. The university that popped her out naive and unprepared is negligent. It’s not as if the job market hasn’t been pretty bad for four years going on five or anything.

These educrats take much for granted and have failed all three of these recent grads, imho.


18 posted on 07/01/2012 4:21:58 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 9YearLurker

“Now finding a job that ‘uses’ an undergraduate psychology degree, on the other hand...”

If someone with a psychology degree doesn’t know what they are going to do with it, they wasted 4 years. My kid is a freshman majoring in psychology and she altrady started her business plan for when she graduates.

That’s the difference between conservatives and liberals. Libs are waiting to be handed a job. Conservatives create a job.


19 posted on 07/01/2012 4:23:31 AM PDT by EQAndyBuzz (ABO 2012)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Degrees should have different values monetarily. I cant understand why someone would waste so much money on a history degree. I’m on a plan to get my masters in accounting and my CPA so hopefully I will be straight


20 posted on 07/01/2012 4:25:55 AM PDT by chevydude26
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 9YearLurker

“Now finding a job that ‘uses’ an undergraduate psychology degree, on the other hand...”

Start up a web business. The domain name “psycho-facebook.com” is avaliable. I see that psycho-termite control.net is also free.

The list is endless, man:

psycho-painters.com
psycho-lawncare.com
psycho-bailbondsman.com


21 posted on 07/01/2012 4:33:10 AM PDT by sergeantdave (Public unions exist to protect the unions from the taxpaying public)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
More than 5,000 people graduated from Texas colleges and universities with bachelor's degrees in psychology in 2010, she said, to compete for four job openings in the field, with an annual salary of $22,000.

You can't fix this kind of stupid. Many of these mis-educated idiots will be going back to school to get an MBA or Law degree to pile on top of their under-grad fluff, and will just further degrade our corporations and politics.

22 posted on 07/01/2012 4:42:24 AM PDT by meadsjn (Sarah 2012, or sooner)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LittleBillyInfidel

:)


23 posted on 07/01/2012 4:45:20 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: meadsjn

Which is more insulting: Voting for Obama as a liberal or being degreed in psychology to recognize they are voting for a narcissist?


24 posted on 07/01/2012 4:48:58 AM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
The recession changed the economy permanently, economists say. In this largely jobless recovery, millions of mid- and entry-level positions are gone, the work now automated.

Oh BS, some jobs have been lost to automation, but millions have been exported with the exported manufacturing plants, and millions more white collar type jobs are being outsourced to India and many other nations.

Heard a recent radio spot discussing how more and more legal work is being outsourced to India. There is hardly a profession now that hasn't seen significant work outsourced: engineering, accounting, computer programming and other work, drafting, law, tax preparation, radiology and other medical related work, and not even to mention customer service and other types of call center work.

Some will continue to pretend that the above has little to do with our unemployment/underemployment situation and fiscal problems because so many campaign contributors now outsource work.

But don't worry, it's being made up for by the $1 trillion dollars now being spent annually on support program benefits that go mostly to working aged Americans. 60 million Americans now on Medicaid, and that will rise to 80 million if the Obamacare expansion is carried out. Similar stats for other government support programs.

25 posted on 07/01/2012 4:51:07 AM PDT by Will88
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

I have a 21-year-old in the military and an 18-year-old in community college/working. I’m sorry that so many potentially productive young people believed that any degree was a ticket to easy wealth. Now they’re stuck.

I graduated with a degree in management in 1989 in a down economy. Couldn’t move for a job because I’d gotten married, so I started as a secretary at That Insurance Company and moved up. There aren’t as many secretary jobs these days, because people in the main lines of business believe a computer makes them competent to communicate, file, manage time, etc. It doesn’t, but whatever.


26 posted on 07/01/2012 4:51:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and bring me safe to His heavenly kingdom.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

There are loads of businesses and industries where being smart is one of the top hiring criteria. Yeah, maybe not retail.


27 posted on 07/01/2012 4:53:30 AM PDT by 9YearLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: RegulatorCountry
....These educrats take much for granted and have failed all three of these recent grads, imho.

Good post. But there is time and certainly discussions with others about jobs available in their chosen field. A LOT of kids take the cue that they're barking up the wrong tree and switch out of dead end majors. Some just are biding their time in college 'till they have to go out and work (that loan money is just some far-away problem -- if they were working to pay for these classes they might just think twice about what their major is).

28 posted on 07/01/2012 4:53:34 AM PDT by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Cvengr

There aren’t too many well known politicians who aren’t narcissists. It’s just a matter of degree.


29 posted on 07/01/2012 4:54:59 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: y'all
I don't understand why people pay for education in the first place. With the internet and sites like Kahn Academy the only reason to pay for education is to acquire an increasingly worthless piece of paper.
30 posted on 07/01/2012 4:55:16 AM PDT by Mycroft Holmes (<= Mash name for HTML Xampp PHP C JavaScript primer. Programming for everyone.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Cvengr
Which is more insulting: Voting for Obama as a liberal or being degreed in psychology to recognize they are voting for a narcissist?

Perhaps they will show up to support the fall riots, and will learn something interesting.

31 posted on 07/01/2012 4:56:55 AM PDT by meadsjn (Sarah 2012, or sooner)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
When most university faculty are decidedly anti-capitalist is it any wonder so much of their product doesn’t mesh with the business world?
32 posted on 07/01/2012 4:57:14 AM PDT by John 3_19-21 (Stand for something, or fall for anything.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
Looking at the girls ring and also being from Texas I thought of the saying

"All Hat...No Cattle"

It is almost like a new saying can emerge these days something like...

College Ring...Ain't worth a thing.

or

College bills...no skills.

33 posted on 07/01/2012 4:59:04 AM PDT by BRL
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

History degree???? What the HELL would they be good for in the workplace?? NOTHING but be Mr. KnowitAll.

Ha ha ha. I have a history degree and wish I was a know-it-all! I fly jets off carriers now:)


34 posted on 07/01/2012 4:59:11 AM PDT by ThunderStruck94
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

Bump


35 posted on 07/01/2012 5:01:59 AM PDT by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: meadsjn
Perhaps they will show up to support the fall riots, and will learn something interesting.

Never seems to work out like that.

36 posted on 07/01/2012 5:02:29 AM PDT by BRL
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

Cry me a river. My generation started out in the mail room and secretarial pool and they ended up doing pretty well for themselves. Well, until Obama came along...


37 posted on 07/01/2012 5:03:10 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: meadsjn

We heard a tale from a law graduate to the effect that he pays rent for his office use to the law firm and commissions on any cases for which he can bill.


38 posted on 07/01/2012 5:06:12 AM PDT by reformedliberal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: pepsionice

I consider my place in this economy right now to be a unique one. From my engineering background to my natural inquisitive mindset on how things work, how to make them work and how to make them, I can keep myself busy with work of all types. As an independent contractor I pick and choose the work and projects that people need my services to bring to reality. Essentially, I make people ideas become real and am very deft at fixing things.

This is of added value if the economy goes totally off the rails and we become like Greece where a barter system is what they are relegated to. But in reality, is not everybody involved in some sort of barter system anyway?


39 posted on 07/01/2012 5:06:12 AM PDT by mazda77 (and I am a Native Texan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Will88

You can’t go wrong being a garbage man.


40 posted on 07/01/2012 5:10:27 AM PDT by ilovesarah2012
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

“College grads learning good jobs hard to find now”

Pfffft!

I have a bucket. I shall cry all of two tears into it.

Take it to SCOTUS. They may be able to find a way to mandate you a job.


41 posted on 07/01/2012 5:12:21 AM PDT by VanDeKoik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mycroft Holmes

What an amazing site! Thanks for that.


42 posted on 07/01/2012 5:17:39 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: ThunderStruck94

Well, God Bless You!! Pretty sure you had OTHER training and Education than History to fly....right?


43 posted on 07/01/2012 5:18:23 AM PDT by Ann Archy ( ABORTION...the HUMAN Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Ann Archy

Yeah, we’re completely useless. Let’s see.

I’ve done advertising (since I can do public speaking, know how to write, and know how to appeal to other people).

I’ve done research (since I know my way around a library and can dig through any archive)

I’ve done freelance writing (since I can write just about anything your little heart desires from technical reports to poety).

I’ve done database work, since I’m trained in systematically organizing information so as to be accessable and understandable.

History majors have quite a few talents that are hard to find in other occupations. I can do most anything because most of all, if I don’t know how to do it, I know how to learn it.


44 posted on 07/01/2012 5:19:30 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

I’d be interested in knowing how many of these are first generation university grads. On the one hand, first generation tend to be more focused on a degree as a means to a better standard of living, but on the other, they have no basis upon which to form expectations, no network of family and family contacts to help guide them. My father was the first to attend college in his family since the Civil War, and I was the first to graduate. It’s very different, knowing now what I didn’t know then. I have no children but my niece will benefit, I’ll make certain of that.


45 posted on 07/01/2012 5:19:44 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife; All
“You go to school thinking you're going to graduate and there's going to be a job in an office waiting for you,” he said, “but a few years into it, you realize that's not really going to happen.”

You go to a 2008 Political Rally and let this Black, Marxist, Muslim guy charm and mesmerize you, and you join in with hundreds of others and chant: YES WE CAN! YES WE CAN! Then after three years of the Marxist's Presidency you realize that "NO WE CAN'T!".

Well, what can I say? Hope the couch in your parents' basement is comfy and that they rag on your a** everyday to get out and find a job that's not there. And, if America reelects Barack Obama on November 6, 2012, I hope that everyone who votes for him loses their job, their house, their car and end up in living together in the park in a tent with all the "Occupy" scum; getting mugged, robbed and raped.
46 posted on 07/01/2012 5:19:44 AM PDT by pistolpackinpapa (Why is it that you never see any Obama bumper stickers on cars going to work in the mornings?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: miss marmelstein

Is this before or after they passed Obamacare and asked us to read it to find out what’s in it?


47 posted on 07/01/2012 5:21:20 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas, Texas, Whisky)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: BRL

More importantly, the A&M grad had a real opportunity staring her in the face for four years and she failed to acknowledge it. She could have chosen one of the ROTC programs, gotten a military commission, and now be employed to learn real skills that will have value after she leaves the military. Plenty of liberal arts majors have been down that path over the years and have gotten good jobs because of those management skills from the military experience.

At a minimum, you no longer get an employer response about lacking experience.


48 posted on 07/01/2012 5:24:50 AM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: JCBreckenridge

I came of age during Jimmy Carter’s miserable administration. I made under $100 a week for the first year and maybe $125 the second year. It built up my work skills and toughened me up (well, somewhat). So, I don’t have a lot of sympathy for kids with an English degree who want $60,000 straight out of the box.


49 posted on 07/01/2012 5:25:39 AM PDT by miss marmelstein
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife

History, psychology and electronic media? You’d have to be very creative to find a job that directly translates to the first two. Electronic media, this person needs to move to a podunk town and get a job with the TV station or become a technical writer, if they learned any writing in college.


50 posted on 07/01/2012 5:28:00 AM PDT by rabidralph
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-200201-240 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson