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Lives in danger as many seek refuge from extreme heat
CNN ^ | July 1, 2012 | By the CNN Wire Staff

Posted on 07/01/2012 7:00:04 AM PDT by Oldeconomybuyer

(CNN) -- People in a huge swath of the United States are being urged to seek out shelters as needed on Sunday as a historic heat wave continues to bring sizzing temperatures -- including to some who have lost power.

Extreme heat is the leading cause of weather-related deaths in the United States.

Nineteen states were under excessive heat warnings or heat advisories on Sunday morning, according to the National Weather Service. Temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit were expected in much of the Southeast.

Over the past week, nearly 1600 high temperatures have been broken -- including 140 all-time highs, according to the National Climatic Data Center. Statistics for Saturday, when more records were broken, were not yet available.

Meanwhile, a derecho -- or massive storm -- that moved across the Ohio Valley to the Northeast on Friday left 12 people dead and millions without power. Many remained without power on Sunday.

Some residents in the affected areas, particularly between Chicago and Washington, were likely to see high temperatures in the 90s or even 100 on Sunday, said CNN Meterologist Sarah Dillingham. "Even with areas seeing temperatures in the 80s to low 90s, no air conditioning will still pose a major threat."

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: energy
"So if somebody wants to build a coal-powered plant, they can. It's just that it will bankrupt them because they’re going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that's being emitted."

Barack Obama, Jan. 17, 2008

1 posted on 07/01/2012 7:00:10 AM PDT by Oldeconomybuyer
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
"We can't drive our SUVs and eat as much as we want and keep our homes on 72 degrees at all times ... and then just expect that other countries are going to say OK"

Barack Obama, May 16, 2008

2 posted on 07/01/2012 7:03:25 AM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
a derecho -- or massive storm

Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for "right")?

3 posted on 07/01/2012 7:04:58 AM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

We had power outages 2 days in a row here in southern Michigan and didn’t even have storms.

Clearly we need to close some more coal fired plants and raise some more windmills /s


4 posted on 07/01/2012 7:07:09 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
"So if somebody wants to build a coal-powered plant, they can. It's just that it will bankrupt them because they’re going to be charged a huge sum for all that greenhouse gas that's being emitted."

Barack Obama, Jan. 17, 2008

Lets save the planet from ourselves from a nonexistent issue, then we can talk about those human lives being lost.

Politics fit's in there somewhere too I'm sure...

5 posted on 07/01/2012 7:07:15 AM PDT by EGPWS (Trust in God, question everyone else)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

Let me be the first...

BUSH’S FAULT


6 posted on 07/01/2012 7:10:41 AM PDT by unixfox (Abolish Slavery, Repeal The 16th Amendment!)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

Cool and cloudy in Sacramento... “feels like” spring.


7 posted on 07/01/2012 7:10:54 AM PDT by TauntedTiger (Keep away from the fence!)
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To: cripplecreek
Clearly we need to close some more coal fired plants and raise some more windmills /s

Coal is so passe'.

We have a million beautiful windmills and solar panels in the making to take care of our needs.

8 posted on 07/01/2012 7:11:31 AM PDT by EGPWS (Trust in God, question everyone else)
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To: EGPWS

Well put up a big solar panel over my house so I can at least have some shade.


9 posted on 07/01/2012 7:15:24 AM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
No power here since 4:00pm Friday, and it might be 4-5 days until we have it back. Fortunately, we have water and sewer, and it's "only" going to reach 94 degrees today. :)

Damage in this part of Ohio is worse than Hurricane Ike brought, with straight line winds of 100 mph.

10 posted on 07/01/2012 7:19:39 AM PDT by TonyInOhio ("If we want to get rid of Obamacare, we're going to have to replace President Obama.")
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

You are correct. However, it also means straight as in straight line winds, as opposed to tornadic winds. sd


11 posted on 07/01/2012 7:26:53 AM PDT by shotdog (I love my country. It's our government I'm afraid of.)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

Power outages predicted for the next several days in DC. If I were a liquor store owner, I’d be sheltering stock or doing the insurance paper work. Now.


12 posted on 07/01/2012 7:27:42 AM PDT by PowderMonkey (WILL WORK FOR AMMO)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

My Toyota Sequoia makes me completely at fault! Evil times 10!


13 posted on 07/01/2012 7:30:25 AM PDT by albie
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To: TauntedTiger

Perfectly lovely in the Sierra...


14 posted on 07/01/2012 7:37:57 AM PDT by sissyjane
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

See, if they had more wind generators in DC they would have power! /s


15 posted on 07/01/2012 7:40:07 AM PDT by hadaclueonce (you are paying 12% more for fuel because of Ethanol. Smile big Corn Lobby,)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

I just said that very same thing. I have never seen that term used to describe a storm. Is it a new one being introduced to us Gringos for use in the United Americas?


16 posted on 07/01/2012 7:44:35 AM PDT by arasina (So there.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

We had a derecho here in MN in 2005 according to the National Weather Service. I don’t recall it being called that at the time. The forecast calls for the threat of one tomorrow.

I’m just glad it’s not an izquierda. Anything coming from the left is bad. ;)


17 posted on 07/01/2012 7:45:25 AM PDT by mplsconservative (Impeach Obama Now!)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

****Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for “right”)? ***

Never heard of it. It is still a rain storm to me.

And a sand storm is a sand storm, not a “haboob” as they on the news are trying to call them now.

Sounds like some are trying to change the English language even more. Remember when NBC did it’s utmost to change the word “thunderstorm” to “thorm”?


18 posted on 07/01/2012 7:45:58 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (I LIKE ART! Click my name. See my web page.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

“Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for “right”)?”

This storm is the first time I ever heard of “derecho” but according to NOAA it goes back to 1888:

Origin of the term “derecho”

The word “derecho” was coined by Dr. Gustavus Hinrichs, a physics professor at the University of Iowa, in a paper published in the American Meteorological Journal in 1888. A defining excerpt from the paper can be seen in this figure showing a derecho crossing Iowa on July 31, 1877. Hinrichs chose this terminology for thunderstorm-induced straight-line winds as an analog to the word tornado. “Derecho” is a Spanish word that can be defined as “direct” or “straight ahead.” In contrast, the word “tornado” is thought by some, including Hinrichs, to have been derived from the Spanish word “tornar,” which means “to turn”. A web page about Gustavus Hinrichs has been created by National Weather Service Science and Operations Officer Ray Wolf. The page provides information on Hinrichs’ background and on his development of the term “derecho” in the late 1800s. Wolf’s page also briefly discusses how the term “derecho” came into more common use in the late 1900s.

Facts About Derechos:

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/derechofacts.htm


19 posted on 07/01/2012 7:56:57 AM PDT by Pelham (John Roberts: the cherry on top of judicial tyranny.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

No, never ... and we lived in Texas and Oklahoma, places notable for storms and Spanish.


20 posted on 07/01/2012 8:02:31 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and bring me safe to His heavenly kingdom.")
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
"Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for "right")?"

Nope. Here in Virginia, we had a very similar storm in the mid-90s, and they just called it a straight-line wind. I swear I think they make up terms as they go along.

21 posted on 07/01/2012 8:06:17 AM PDT by CatherineofAragon (Time for a write-in campaign...Darryl Dixon for President)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

Another good-hot day to clean out the basement.

And a sign to clean out the White House basement


22 posted on 07/01/2012 8:08:28 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar; arasina; mplsconservative
My first thought was the MSM was ramming Spanish down our throats, too.

BUT, it turns out this usage goes back a long ways, all the way to 1877! From Wikipedia:

A derecho (Spanish: derecho "straight"), is a widespread and long-lived, violent convectively induced straight-line windstorm that is associated with a fast-moving band of severe thunderstorms in the form of a squall line usually taking the form of a bow echo. Derechos blow in the direction of movement of their associated storms, similar to a gust front, except that the wind is sustained and generally increases in strength behind the "gust" front. A warm weather phenomenon, derechos occur mostly in summer, especially June and July in the Northern Hemisphere. They can occur at any time of the year and occur as frequently at night as in the daylight hours.

Derecho comes from the Spanish word for "straight". The word was first used in the American Meteorological Journal in 1888 by Gustavus Detlef Hinrichs in a paper describing the phenomenon and based on a significant derecho event that crossed Iowa on 31 July 1877.

He chose "derecho" because "tornado" also is a Spanish word. Apparently the term "derecho" died out for 110 years until the publication of a paper in 1987 that resurrected it and it has become more commonly used to describe long lived convective straight-line wind events.

Origin and Evolution of the Term "Derecho" as a Severe Weather Event


23 posted on 07/01/2012 8:09:28 AM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Pelham

Obviously this change in our language is Iowas’s fault because of all the cars they were driving there in 1877! ;^)


24 posted on 07/01/2012 8:17:24 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Well, I guess a derecho took the steeple off of my stable in 1990; and I didn’t even know it.


25 posted on 07/01/2012 8:19:59 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for "right")?

This is the first time for me.

26 posted on 07/01/2012 8:20:29 AM PDT by null and void (Day 1258 of our ObamaVacation from reality - Heroes aren't made Frank, they're cornered...)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom; Tax-chick

I think derecha is right, and derecho is straight.


27 posted on 07/01/2012 8:23:09 AM PDT by spankalib (The Marx-in-the-Parks crowd is a basement skunkworks operation of the AFL-CIO)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Thanks for providing that info! Thanks to you I learned something new today. I love that! :)


28 posted on 07/01/2012 8:25:21 AM PDT by mplsconservative (Impeach Obama Now!)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

Not until last Monday. Evidently, the term didn’t come into use until 2010, after a ‘derecho’ in 2009 & the weather service needed to call it something. Or so I’ve heard.


29 posted on 07/01/2012 8:25:36 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (Being powerful is like being a lady. If you have to tell people you are, you aren't. (M.Thatcher))
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To: MissMagnolia

See ProtectOurFreedom’s #19. Here in MN, I guess the NWS has been calling these storms derechos since at least 2005. Here’s the weather page for my area today - http://www.crh.noaa.gov/wxstory.php?site=mpx


30 posted on 07/01/2012 8:31:41 AM PDT by mplsconservative (Impeach Obama Now!)
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To: spankalib

Thanks! I used to be fluent, but now my verb tenses are upwhacked and my prepositions seem to be hysterically funny.


31 posted on 07/01/2012 8:32:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and bring me safe to His heavenly kingdom.")
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
a derecho -- or massive storm

"Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for "right")?"

I've never heard this in reference to a storm. Obviously whoever wrote this wants to introduce a Spanish-language term to U.S. weather reports.


32 posted on 07/01/2012 8:45:41 AM PDT by Cinnamontea
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
Some residents in the affected areas, particularly between Chicago and Washington, were likely to see high temperatures in the 90s or even 100 on Sunday...

Not even considered a warm day in these parts. If the temps hits 90 in the summer it is time for light jacket. Guess it is all in what you are used to.


33 posted on 07/01/2012 8:57:05 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

FUBO FUBO FUBO.


34 posted on 07/01/2012 8:57:51 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (A Dalmation was spotted trotting down the street...)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer

Growing up in the 60s I remember very few people having air conditioning.

I guess thousands died and they just didn’t tell us about it.


35 posted on 07/01/2012 8:58:26 AM PDT by 2111USMC (Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
a derecho -- or massive storm

Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before (besides it being Spanish for "right")?<

They probably meant to say, El Drencho.

It's Spanish for mucho agua.

36 posted on 07/01/2012 8:58:41 AM PDT by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
Meanwhile, your honorable citizen CONED union guys are murmuring about a strike as, coincidentally, their contract expires in the dead of summer.

I wish they would, and then get fired.

37 posted on 07/01/2012 9:00:47 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (A Dalmation was spotted trotting down the street...)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

A derecho is a very, very strong straight line wind. While tornadoes rotate and are relatively isolated events, a derecho can stretch a hundred miles along a storm front carrying hurricane force winds.

L


38 posted on 07/01/2012 9:10:16 AM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is, it is the only answer.)
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To: 2111USMC
Growing up in the 60s I remember very few people having air conditioning.

I guess thousands died and they just didn’t tell us about it.

Ditto. We didn't have air conditioning at home, in school, at work, or in the car, but I never heard of thousands of people dropping dead from heat back then. Like you, all I can figure is that "they" just didn't bother telling us about it back then.

39 posted on 07/01/2012 9:28:34 AM PDT by Inyo-Mono (My greatest fear is that when I'm gone my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

As many have pointed out above the term “derecho” is not new. Derechos are more common in the northern plains/midwest and I believe Minnesota is the hot spot for them.

Derechos tend to create their own atmospheres and feed themselves. Being a weather nut (with 2 years of meteorology training in the 70’s) I’m very familiar with them. Just think of the small “bow echoes” you see from time to time on local radars and scale it up to a multi-state size, have it travel for hundreds of miles at a high speed and you’ve got an idea what they are.


40 posted on 07/01/2012 9:39:09 AM PDT by TruBluKentuckian
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

“Has ANYBODY ever heard that term before”

Yes. It is a correct saying.


41 posted on 07/01/2012 9:42:24 AM PDT by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: gunsequalfreedom

That part of the country has a different type of heat because of the humidity factor. I wll take 115 here in Yuma over 100 in Atlanta any day. That sticky heat sucks. Even the humidity we experience during our Monsoon season doesn’t compare to what the experience in the Southeast. That is why I love living in the desert!


42 posted on 07/01/2012 9:43:04 AM PDT by sean327 (God created all men equal, then some become Marines!)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

It looks like he chose the spanish word for “straight” to describe these storms because he thought that tornado was based on the spanish word for “turn”.


43 posted on 07/01/2012 9:52:55 AM PDT by Pelham (John Roberts: the cherry on top of judicial tyranny.)
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To: sean327
That is why I love living in the desert!

That is why I love living in the desert!...and my swamp cooler. It will be over 100 here today but sitting outside on my back patio with the sliding door wide open it will will be a wonderful 80 degrees.

Can't use those swamp coolers in that eastern humidity. The whole place feels like a sweltering swamp. I'm with you. Keep the humidity.

44 posted on 07/01/2012 11:46:34 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: sissyjane

82 degrees in Sacramento... feels like 81.


45 posted on 07/01/2012 3:52:38 PM PDT by TauntedTiger (Keep away from the fence!)
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