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Legendary Viking town unearthed
ScienceNordic ^ | July 2, 2012 | Niels Ebdrup

Posted on 07/03/2012 7:16:38 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands

Danish archaeologists believe they have found the remains of the fabled Viking town Sliasthorp by the Schlei bay in northern Germany, near the Danish border.

According to texts from the 8th century, the town served as the centre of power for the first Scandinavian kings.

But historians have doubted whether Sliasthorp even existed. This doubt is now starting to falter, as archaeologists from Aarhus University are making one amazing discovery after the other in the German soil.

"This is huge. Wherever we dig, we find houses – we reckon there are around 200 of them,” says Andres Dobat, a lecturer in prehistoric archaeology at Aarhus University.

(Excerpt) Read more at sciencenordic.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: aarhus; andresdobat; archaeology; germany; godsgravesglyphs; sliasthorp; viking; vikings

1 posted on 07/03/2012 7:16:44 PM PDT by Engraved-on-His-hands
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

“This is huge. Wherever we dig, we find houses – we reckon there are around 200 of them,” says Andres Dobat, a lecturer in prehistoric archaeology at Aarhus University...
.
“Reckon”? This guy must be from SOUTH Denmark.


2 posted on 07/03/2012 7:26:23 PM PDT by fidelis (Zonie and USAF Cold Warrior)
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Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: fidelis
This utterly pedestrian and quite commonly used word in the Midwest is apparently identified by some parties as being typical of the South, and without any literary use.

I think they are nuts.

Can't imagine talking without using this word.

4 posted on 07/03/2012 7:39:53 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: fidelis

We are talking about Schleiswig, which is so far south in Denmark, that it’s been German since the 1864.


5 posted on 07/03/2012 7:42:20 PM PDT by rmlew ("Mosques are our barracks, minarets our bayonets, domes our helmets, the believers our soldiers.")
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To: fidelis
This utterly pedestrian and quite commonly used word in the Midwest is apparently identified by some parties as being typical of the South, and without any literary use.

I think they are nuts.

Can't imagine talking without using this word.

6 posted on 07/03/2012 7:43:20 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: fidelis

“Reckon”? This guy must be from SOUTH Denmark.

Only if he had said, “ Sh*t I reckon.”


7 posted on 07/03/2012 7:47:21 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: fidelis

I reckon.

8 posted on 07/03/2012 7:47:50 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (If you like lying Socialist dirtbags, you'll love Slick Willard)
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To: fidelis

It’s English. The use of “reckon” came to be regarded as archaic and fell out of usage in other areas of the country, but it remains in the south and midwest. Whether that’s attributable to migratory patterns or not, well, I’d say I reckon so, lol. An English usage regarded as archaic elsewhere in the country becoming common parlance amongst midwesterners has to be attributed to an outside source, since the population has a far more continental European heritage. That source was southerners, largely of English heritage, who also struck out for the west, particularly during and after the Civil War.


9 posted on 07/03/2012 7:55:35 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: muawiyah
we reckon there are around 200 of them

Yes, the word is used quite properly, in its basic sense of "estimate."

10 posted on 07/03/2012 7:55:49 PM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: RegulatorCountry
It’s English. The use of “reckon” came to be regarded as archaic and fell out of usage in other areas of the country, but it remains in the south and midwest.

It's just slang for , or an abbreviated form of 'reckoning'.

11 posted on 07/03/2012 8:02:12 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: UCANSEE2

It’s not slang at all. You’ll hear very proper, even posh accented English speakers using the word today.


12 posted on 07/03/2012 8:05:24 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: muawiyah

“Can’t imagine talking without using this word”. yours must be an intellect to be reckoned with


13 posted on 07/03/2012 8:09:45 PM PDT by stickywillie (a corrupt parallel universe exists beside our wonderful Constitution)
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To: Cicero

The more common use of it in my area is a substitute for “guess”.


14 posted on 07/03/2012 8:27:43 PM PDT by Rebelbase (The most transparent administration ever is clear as mud.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Archaeologists are digging up a legendary Viking town in northern Germany.

Incredibaly enough, the main topic of discussion on this thread is the use of the word, “reckon”.


15 posted on 07/03/2012 8:59:30 PM PDT by SatinDoll
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To: RegulatorCountry
It’s not slang at all.

That's why I said, "or..."

What is interesting is that it has somehow become associated with or thought of as 'redneck' slang. Perhaps because of TV and Movies ? Perhaps it's just me.

: )

16 posted on 07/03/2012 9:47:01 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: SatinDoll; SunkenCiv
Incredibaly enough, the main topic of discussion on this thread is the use of the word, “reckon”.

True... but if we can figger out why the Archaeologist used the word 'reckon', then we will know why the Vikings would go to all the trouble to bury an entire town over in Germany.

17 posted on 07/03/2012 9:53:19 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lame and ill-informed post)
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To: UCANSEE2

Rural people use it most frquently. Rednecks tend rural. It sounds quaint or even backward to ears unaccustomed to hearing it, so movie and television scripts seem to contain it more often than not.


18 posted on 07/03/2012 9:56:36 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: UCANSEE2

“..then we will know why the Vikings would go to all the trouble to bury an entire town over in Germany.”

I think their guide was lousy in his “dead reckoning” and they were lost.


19 posted on 07/03/2012 10:05:07 PM PDT by 21twelve
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands

BFL - thanks


20 posted on 07/03/2012 10:12:34 PM PDT by Noob1999 (Loose Lips, Sink Ships)
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To: Tzar

Valhalla I am coming.

http://www.myspace.com/video/derold/viking-kitties/995516


21 posted on 07/03/2012 10:32:04 PM PDT by Kevmo ( FRINAGOPWIASS: Free Republic Is Not A GOP Website. It's A Socon Site.)
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To: Rebelbase

An educated guess, as opposed to making stuff up.


22 posted on 07/04/2012 2:05:00 AM PDT by Hieronymus ( (It is terrible to contemplate how few politicians are hanged. --G.K. Chesterton))
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To: fidelis

““This is huge. Wherever we dig, we find houses...”

Same problem in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Florida. That’s why all the banks crashed. If you lend out money like it’s candy, people will build un-needed houses.

...although I’m not sure the same forces were at work in this case.


23 posted on 07/04/2012 3:46:36 AM PDT by BobL
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To: muawiyah

“Can’t imagine talking without using this word”

British persons use it daily.

I guess it’s the influence of Hollywood script writers but it has a southern ring to it to my ear as well.


24 posted on 07/04/2012 4:56:25 AM PDT by TalBlack ( Evil doesn't have a day job.)
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To: UCANSEE2

I ain’t go no idea.


25 posted on 07/04/2012 5:17:12 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: RegulatorCountry
As everybody knows there are more Swedes in America, mostly in the upper Midwest, than in Sweden, but did you also realize there are more Danes in America, mostly in the lower Midwest (aka Ohio Valley), than in Denmark. Indianapolis is the buckle on the Danish Belt BTW.

The Danish word for "reckon" is pret'near the same, but itself doesn't translate into reckon on Google.Translate ~ so somebody thinks reckon doesn't work anymore.

Here's a clue on the term ~ there are people from the Mid Souf who use a phrase containing the word and the phrase itself has developed it's own independent existence.

I'm referring to "reckon as to how". Wisconsin English speaking ethnic Germans picked that one up and I would regularly catch them trying to stuff "as to how" into postal handbooks or regulations.

First time I saw it in writing put me into a laughing fit that made my guts hurt ~ still hurt in fact ~ it was just incredibly funny.

The rough equivalent in Czech and Slovak native speakers is the need for to insert "yet" at the end of English sentences! It's somewhat habitual with everyone from Chicago. There are videos out there of Obama saying what he was going to say (on the teleprompter) and then he says "yet" as a sort of end point telling you 'no mas" or something.

NOTE: There was this area of Danish conquest and settlement in Great Britain. It was called "The Danelaw". They're the ol'boys who say "ask" as "axe". That usage is not Eubonics but Danish.

26 posted on 07/04/2012 5:18:46 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: SatinDoll; UCANSEE2; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks!

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


27 posted on 07/04/2012 5:33:50 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SatinDoll
"Incredibaly enough, the main topic of discussion on this thread is the use of the word, “reckon”."

They like to get the important things out of the way first.
I reckon.

28 posted on 07/04/2012 5:39:57 AM PDT by blam
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To: muawiyah

Reckon= Regne med, Regne for pronounced rye-na

In my usage of regne it translates to “think about” as well.

Det skal jeg regne med.

I lived in southern Denmark in Aabenraa for six months in 1960. Lots of border changes down there.


29 posted on 07/04/2012 5:51:57 AM PDT by Utah Binger (Southern Utah where the world comes to see America)
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To: RegulatorCountry

I live in Southern Virginia and nobody uses “reckon”. I always thought of it more as an Appalatia term that they use in the Western part of the state and WVA, KY, TN, and Western NC. Never thought of it as Southern per se.


30 posted on 07/04/2012 6:16:32 AM PDT by wolfman23601
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To: Engraved-on-His-hands; SunkenCiv

Not many people know that Hedeby was the ancient seat of the Lamarr family. The most famous member of that family became a movie star in the 30s and took the shortened name “Hedy” in honor of her family’s ancient seat.

Speaking of ancient seats, Ms Lamarr’s most famous movie was Ecstasy in which she showed full frontal nudity. Her most memorable movie line, comes from the movie “White Cargo” where she played a native girl who says, “Tondelayo make tiffin.”

Only the gullible have read this far.


31 posted on 07/04/2012 6:53:25 AM PDT by wildbill (You're just jealous because the Voices talk only to me.)
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To: wildbill

I liked it. :’)


32 posted on 07/04/2012 7:12:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Utah Binger
Denmark used to rule Scania (Skåne) which has been part of Sweden for a very long time. Then, Sweden ruled the two provinces on either side of Jutland.

More recently they build a bridge linking Sweden and Denmark ~ using Oresund (golden sound I think) island.

Digging through the records on who owned Oresund I found ancestors who had competing boat slips for fishing fleet type boats on that island ~ some authorized by Danish kings and others authorized by Swedish kings ~ same piece of beach in fact, at the same time.

Those people continue to think they are different!

33 posted on 07/04/2012 7:56:00 AM PDT by muawiyah
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To: wildbill
That's Hedly...


34 posted on 07/04/2012 8:52:47 AM PDT by null and void (Day 1260 of our ObamaVacation from reality - Heroes aren't made Frank, they're cornered...)
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To: muawiyah

Øresund literally translated means Ear Sound or simply “The Sound”. Guld is the word for gold. The Øresundbro runs from Amager to Malmö Sweden. We spent Christmas in Copenhagen three years ago and did take that train to Malmö.

Interesting side note: I heard Malmö is the highest Muslim population in Scandinavia. So much for socialism.


35 posted on 07/04/2012 9:31:49 AM PDT by Utah Binger (Southern Utah where the world comes to see America)
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To: SatinDoll

“Archaeologists are digging up a legendary Viking town in northern Germany...Incredibaly enough, the main topic of discussion on this thread is the use of the word, “reckon”.”
.
.
LOL! I’m almost sorry I did, except that it turned out to to be a fairly entertaining thread. I reckon I shouldn’t of oughta done that. :)


36 posted on 07/04/2012 9:56:30 AM PDT by fidelis (Zonie and USAF Cold Warrior)
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To: Utah Binger
Interesting ~ thanks ~ I thought it had been named by the ancient Indo-Europeans (who spoke something more like modern Latvian) who came through there, not the more modern Norse.

Sometimes the same sound values will have dramatically different meanings in different, even different but adjacent, languages.

37 posted on 07/04/2012 4:59:53 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Utah Binger

Malmo is the Southernmost point in Sweden. You get a good Fimbulwinter going those guys are going home.


38 posted on 07/04/2012 5:01:06 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah
Danish is a relatively simple language from the case point of view. Conjugation is easy for most verbs and that is the key. If you memorize about forty or fifty verbs and their conjugation you will have the written language down for sentence structure. Problem is the spoken language which is guttural and quite hard to hear. Plus all regions are influenced by neighboring countries. In southern Jylland the language is similar in many ways to old English. An interesting thing is any town in England whose name ends in by was at one time a Norse village as by translates to town or village which dates back to the Vikings.

You can add all of this to your gee whiz file. If you are ever in southern Utah come and visit and we'll serve up all the Danish food you can handle in addition to a bit of Akvavit!

39 posted on 07/04/2012 6:03:37 PM PDT by Utah Binger (Southern Utah where the world comes to see America)
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