Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

MiG-29s Begin Sea Trials Aboard India’s New Aircraft Carrier
AIN online ^ | July 10, 2012 | Vladimir Karnozov

Posted on 07/09/2012 8:39:53 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki

MiG-29s Begin Sea Trials Aboard India’s New Aircraft Carrier

by Vladimir Karnozov

July 9, 2012, 1:30 AM Open-sea testing of the new Indian Navy aircraft carrier Vikramaditya and her primary weapons, in the form of MiG-29K/KUB deck fighters, means that the MiGs won’t be making appearance here at the 2012 Farnborough International Airshow. The ship has been bought from Russia to replace the former British-built HMS Hermes, which India acquired in 1986 and renamed Viraat. “Resources of our flight-test department are heavily engaged in the carrier trials, and this is why we are not able to demonstrate our aircraft at this year’s show at Farnborough,” Elena Fedorova, spokeswoman for Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG (RAC MiG), told AIN.

Following completion of extensive refit and modernization work, the Vikramaditya departed Severodvinsk harbor on June 8, 2012. She will spend the rest of the year in the White and Barents seas, ahead of anticipated delivery to the customer in time for Indian Navy Day on December 4.

The Vikramaditya is a “through-deck” carrier of the Stobar (short-takeoff but arrested-recovery) type with a complement of 1,924 crew. Originally a heavy aircraft-carrying cruiser, in 1978 the ship was delivered to what was then the Soviet navy, with which is served under the name Admiral Gorshkov until 1998.

Then the cruiser was offered to India as an alternative to an Invincible-class “Harrier-carrier” available from the UK. A deal was struck in March 2004, leading the cruiser into Russia’s Sevmash dry dock in December 2005 for conversion, which has included significant content from UK systems suppliers, as well as equipment from Croatia, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Japan, Finland, France, Norway, Poland and Sweden. She was relaunched in November 2008 as a Project 11430 aircraft carrier, and now features a 14-degree ski ramp and three arrestor wires.

At face value, India’s new aircraft carrier will not compare too badly with the new carriers ordered by the British Royal Navy, and has certainly worked out a lot cheaper. With the inclusion of separate contracts for training, ground equipment and shore infrastructure installations, the bill totals approximately $1.9 billion. By comparison, the bill for the UK’s new Queen Elizabeth-class carrier is in the region of $4.7 billion.

The new Royal Navy carrier has the same 920-foot length as the Vikramaditya, but a larger full displacement at 65,600 metric tons, versus 45,300 metric tons, and a larger hangar to house a fleet of more than 40 F-35 Lightning II fighters, plus Merlin and Lynx Wildcat helicopters. The Indian carrier will accommodate a mix of between 30 and 34 MiG fighters and Kamov helicopters.

None of the Indian Navy’s fleet of aircraft will be deployed for the sea trails of the Vikramaditya. Instead, RAC MiG has provided MiG-29K and MiG-29KUB prototypes. Also involved in the sea trials is a MiG-35D demonstrator believed to have been outfitted with an arrestor hook–a decision influenced by the crash of a purpose-built MiG-29KUB at the Russian defense ministry firing range at Akhtubinsk in June 2011. The MiG-29K lifted by crane onto the Vikramaditya’s flight deck last year and serves as a full-scale mockup. First flown in 1988, this veteran aircraft had an extensive operational life before being grounded.

New MiGs

India took delivery of 16 MiG-29K/KUBs in 2010-2011. They replaced Sea Harriers in the Black Panther squadron at Hansa naval airbase in Goa province. Last year it firmed up an option for 29 additional MiGs, which are due for delivery between now and 2014.

The MiG-29K/KUB differs from the classic MiG-29 Fulcrum in having a reworked airframe with 15 percent more composite materials. It comes with a larger folding wing with extensive high-lift surfaces for shorter takeoff and landing distances. Maximum gross weight has been increased to 24.5 metric tons and the weapons load to 4.5 tons.

The latest MiG-29s also feature higher-thrust Fadec-equipped Klimov RD-33MK engines with smokeless combustors, digital fly-by-wire flight controls, open-architecture systems on the MIL-STD-1553B databus and a lowered radar signature. Increased range is achieved through enlarged inner tanks and in-flight refueling system. The aircraft can be refueled in flight using the PAK-1MK pod.

The Russian defense ministry ordered 24 deck fighters from RAC MiG in February 2012. Deliveries are scheduled for 2013-2015. MiG’s general manager, Sergei Korotkov, said the ministry order came after the company spent many years on development, testing and setting up series production of the MiG-29K. “The MiG-29K and other versions derived from the baseline model shall ensure a stable workload for the company in the middle term,” he added.

AESA Radar

The Russian Navy aircraft will differ from the Indian Navy MiGs. “These airplanes will be made to a new technical specification that complies with [Russian] defense ministry requirements,” the manufacturer said. A new radar with active electronically scanned antenna (AESA) is expected to take the place of the Phazotron Zhuk-M with a slotted antenna and mechanical radar beam scanning, the radar fitted to the Indian MiGs.

Vladimir Barkovsky, chief of the MiG engineering center, said that in the course of RAC MiG’s unsuccessful bid for India’s medium multi-role combat aircraft competition, the company demonstrated the performance of the Zhuk-MA on the MiG-35D demonstrator: “We demonstrated that the radar actually works in air-to-air and ground-mapping modes,” he explained. “It can select, discriminate and track targets. During these trials, the MiG-35 launched a missile that destroyed a drone using radar data for targeting.”

On the company’s marketing strategy, Barkovsky said MiG will “aggressively promote” both naval (MiG-29K/KUB) and land-based (MiG-29M1/M2/35) models sharing a common platform with state-of-the-art avionics, improved engines, advanced construction materials, larger fuel stores and new weapons. “We believe this platform has a lot of potential and can generate sales over a long period of time,” he said. “We will develop this platform further [with] more fifth-generation technology insertions, such as the active radar, new optics and other sensors, state-of-the-art ECM and so on. We have already implemented fully digital fly-by-wire on the MiG-29K and flight-tested AESA radar and the newest composite materials on the MiG-35.”

Having secured a place on the carrier deck, the MiG is seeking to sell advanced Fulcrums to ground-based forces. With this in mind, the prototype of the MiG-29M2 twin-seat land-based fighter commenced flight tests in December. A single-seat MiG-29M derivative joined the testing last February.

Syria placed an order for 24 MiG-29M1s/M2s in May 2008, with deliveries due in 2012-2014. It remains to be seen whether this contract will be completed, in view of the current unrest in the Middle Eastern country, although Russian authorities have yet to indicate any intention to block military exports to the government of President Bashar Assad.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aerospace; mig29; navair

1 posted on 07/09/2012 8:39:56 AM PDT by sukhoi-30mki
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: sukhoi-30mki

Hmmm. Sure loooks like an F-15. Wonder where the Russkies got the disease.


2 posted on 07/09/2012 8:54:28 AM PDT by RexBeach (Mr. Obama Can't Count.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: RexBeach

“Disease” s/b “design”


3 posted on 07/09/2012 8:58:28 AM PDT by RexBeach (Mr. Obama Can't Count.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: RexBeach
Hmmm. Sure loooks like an F-15. Wonder where the Russkies got the [design].

Well as McDoug originally developed the F-15 after copying the layout of the MiG-25, maybe we'll never know.

>>>

4 posted on 07/09/2012 9:09:38 AM PDT by Oztrich Boy (Literals will believe anything.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Oztrich Boy

Yea, but only one has never been shot down in air combat. It sure as hell wasn’t the MIG-25.


5 posted on 07/09/2012 9:25:11 AM PDT by InsidiousMongo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Oztrich Boy

Just curious, where did you hear that McDonnell-Douglas copied the MIG-25?


6 posted on 07/09/2012 9:35:09 AM PDT by rlmorel ("The safest road to Hell is the gradual one." Screwtape (C.S. Lewis))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Oztrich Boy
One source claims that the Russians used the North American A-5 Vigilante as the pattern for the MiG-25 Foxbat. The original Vigilante design sported twin tails. This was reduced to a single tail because the Navy needed to fold that tail to get the plane into a hangar deck.

Photobucket

7 posted on 07/09/2012 9:35:59 AM PDT by Tallguy (It's all 'Fun and Games' until somebody loses an eye!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: RexBeach

Doesn’t really look like an F-15 to me, other than it has two engines and two tails.


8 posted on 07/09/2012 9:40:42 AM PDT by rlmorel ("The safest road to Hell is the gradual one." Screwtape (C.S. Lewis))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Tallguy

I agree it kind of looks more like it...the Vigilante was a big plane, a lot bigger than one would think. They were still using them for recon when I was in, one of the last planes (along with the Skywarrior, Crusader and Phantom) that still used the cables to launch instead of the now traditional nose gear.

What amazed me about them was, having built models of them as a kid, was just how big they were. IIRC, you can walk upright underneath the plane with headroom to spare!


9 posted on 07/09/2012 9:49:00 AM PDT by rlmorel ("The safest road to Hell is the gradual one." Screwtape (C.S. Lewis))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: sukhoi-30mki

Carrier landings using an arresting wire are very difficult. So where are the Indian pilots going to get their training? I can’t see carrier landings just being learned by trial and error and only the US Navy has extensive experience with that type of carrier landing.


10 posted on 07/09/2012 9:55:36 AM PDT by The Great RJ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tallguy

IIRC, the Vigilante’s engine inlet design was supersonic state of the art and was “researched and borrowed” for the MiG-25.


11 posted on 07/09/2012 10:00:12 AM PDT by GBA (To understand what is happening to America and why, read The Harbinger by Jonathan Cahn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: The Great RJ

http://livefist.blogspot.com/2008/10/photos-indian-navy-pilots-carrier.html


12 posted on 07/09/2012 10:06:22 AM PDT by Tallguy (It's all 'Fun and Games' until somebody loses an eye!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: RexBeach
Wonder where the Russkies got the design.

Probably from their MiG-25. Beyond a quick glance, there are more differences than similarities, starting with size and weight.

The Soviet design's differences are interesting. Look at where the engines are located relative to the MiG-29's center line compared to the F-15. They are much lower on the MiG and I can't help but wonder how that effects handling.

Speaking of...check out how the engine intake doors can be closed to keep it from sucking FOD into the engines while on the ground. I'm not sure, but I think it can take off with the inlet doors closed. F-15s don't have that.

13 posted on 07/09/2012 10:14:42 AM PDT by GBA (To understand what is happening to America and why, read The Harbinger by Jonathan Cahn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: GBA

The Russian planes have built in screens to keep foreign objects out of the engines. Once the plane takes off or lands the screens become useless extra weight in flight. Our method is to keep our taxiways and runways clean.


14 posted on 07/09/2012 1:01:14 PM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (Liberals make unrealistic demands on reality and reality doesn't oblige them.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Hillarys Gate Cult

Just reread my last post. I meant that the FOD screens are only useful on takeoffs and landings.


15 posted on 07/09/2012 1:03:33 PM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (Liberals make unrealistic demands on reality and reality doesn't oblige them.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Hillarys Gate Cult
Exactly, that's the point. The engine doors close and they suck air through vents on top of the wing while on the ground.

The MiG-29 was originally designed to be able to operate off of much rougher, improvised or forward field conditions than the perfect and well manicured, FOD free runways our jet engines like best.

It's an interesting solution to a common problem. Remember the Concorde crash, Air France Flight 4590?

16 posted on 07/09/2012 2:21:22 PM PDT by GBA (To understand what is happening to America and why, read The Harbinger by Jonathan Cahn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Hillarys Gate Cult
The Russian planes have built in screens to keep foreign objects out of the engines. Once the plane takes off or lands the screens become useless extra weight in flight. Our method is to keep our taxiways and runways clean.

The US system is design to operate at peak performance, given ideal conditions.

The Russian is design to operate under wartime conditions.

17 posted on 07/09/2012 6:47:47 PM PDT by Oztrich Boy (Literals will believe anything.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Oztrich Boy
The Russian is design to operate under wartime conditions.

The Russian and European air forces always seemed to put more emphasis on operating from crude, airstrips. The Saab Viggen (canards) & Draken fighters (double-delta wing) combined high & low-speed handling for excellent short-field performance under wartime conditions. During exercises they'd operate from roads and shelter under overpasses.

The Germans did a lot of work on vertical takeoff & landing. The Brits piggybacked off of that research with their Kestral -- which was the fore-runner of the Harrier.

The USAF researched a lot of this stuff and evaluated the technology of our allies, but it never got adopted save for maybe the A-10.

18 posted on 07/10/2012 4:28:51 AM PDT by Tallguy (It's all 'Fun and Games' until somebody loses an eye!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson