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191st Birthday Tribute to General Forrest
Canda Free Press ^ | July 13, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 07/13/2012 2:14:55 PM PDT by BigReb555

It should be also noted that after the War Between the States, Bedford Forrest returned home with the 'free' black men who fought with him.

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: american; anniversary; confederate; dixie; forrest; nathanbedfordforrest; scv
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Nelson W. Winbush, a Black and respected member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, as a child accompanied his grandfather Louis Napoleon Nelson to United Confederate Veteran Reunions. Private Nelson was a Black Confederate who saw service during the War Between the States Battles of Shiloh, Lookout Mountain, Brice's Crossroads and Vicksburg--as a soldier and served as chaplain in the 7th Tennessee Cavalry, under Lt. General Nathan Bedford Forrest.

It should be also noted that after the War Between the States, Bedford Forrest returned home with the 'free' black men who fought with him. Sixty-five black troopers were with the General when he surrendered his command in May 1865. Forrest said of these black soldiers, "No finer Confederates ever fought.”

In 2011, a Memorial was held at Forrest Park in Memphis, Tennessee commemorating the 106th anniversary of the dedication of the Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest statue where Forrest and his wife are buried. The headline of a news story reads:

Memphis: Forrest: A Confederate figure who still divides,

And the first paragraph begins the story with, quote “Gray-uniformed soldier re-enactors fired long-barreled muskets in salute and United Daughters of the Confederacy in ankle-length dresses set wreaths before the towering statue of Nathan Bedford Forest in Memphis, paying tribute to a Confederate cavalryman whose exploits still divide Americans today.” unquote

Read more at: http://www.starnewsonline.com/article/20110717/ARTICLES/110719774

Some people believe Forrest to have been a controversial Confederate Cavalry Officer but by definition the word “controversial” can refer to anyone or anything some folks don’t understand. Some people disapprove of the sex, violence or excessive language in some Hollywood movies but movies are seldom referred to as controversial. The word controversial however is often used to describe some American and World Leaders and events of the past and present but this apparently doesn’t apply to those who are “PC” Politically Correct in their reasoning and actions.

Why do some people criticize men like General Nathan Bedford Forrest, General Robert E. Lee and President Jefferson Davis who stood honorably for the Southern cause of Independence, 1861-1865? The men and women of the Old South believed they were standing for the same principles as did their Fathers and Grandfathers during the American Revolution of 1776!

Why is the Confederate Battle flag, the banner of many brave soldiers, also under attack?

There is much written about the War Between the States but very little about the relentless and unprecedented destruction suffered by the civilians of a free and sovereign nation, the Confederate States of America. There also seems today to be complacency about the history of the destruction of the American-Indian and his way of life. Do you know which Union Commander said “the only good Indian is a dead Indian?”…Or is this too un-politically correct or controversial a topic to discuss with our young people?

Union Gen. William T. Sherman said of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest,

"After all, I think Forrest as the most remarkable man our 'Civil War' produced on either side."

This came from a man who was once a foe of Forrest on the field of battle.

Nathan Bedford was born on July 13, 1821, in Chapel Hill, Tennessee.

Some folks continue to criticize General Forrest for leading the first Ku Klux Klan. It is however written that Forrest denied this and more importantly was responsible for disbanding the Klan after only two years of operation, but….

What about the original Ku Klux Klan?

The original Klan was formed during the dark days of the so-called reconstruction period that lasted from the end of the War Between the States in 1865 until 1870. During this time the South went through a relentless-merciless Carpetbagger rule where Southerners had no vote or say and could not defend themselves. Black and White women of all classes were not safe on the streets. Southern People were not even allowed to hold memorial services for their war dead, display the Confederate flag or criticize the Commanders of the occupying Yankee forces. And some criticize General Forrest for the March 16, 1864, so-called massacre during the War Between the States “Battle of Fort Pillow”, but he was exonerated by Northern officials of wrong doing. This was during a time when the Confederate President Jefferson Davis served two years in prison and some wanted to put him on trial and hang him for treason. Cooler heads seemed to prevail however as some felt this might have more legitimized the late cause of the Southern Confederacy. Confederate Captain Henry Wirz however was hung for so-called war crimes as Commandant of Andersonville Prison and some wanted the same punishment for Gen. Robert E. Lee and other political and military leaders of Dixie.

Why have we forgotten or just never knew about a dark episode of the nation’s history where Mary Surratt, a Southerner, was the first woman ever hung on July 7, 1865? She was among those who were found guilty in the so-called conspiracy to assassinate Abraham Lincoln however she continued to deny her involvement. Forrest might have been given the same punishment with the attitude in post-war Washington, D.C.

Some people have called General Forrest an early advocate for Civil Rights.

Forrest's speech during a meeting of the "Jubilee of Pole Bearers" is a story that should be told. Gen. Forrest was the first white man to be invited by this group which was a forerunner of today's Civil Rights group. A reporter of the Memphis Avalanche newspaper was sent to cover the event that included a Southern barbeque supper.

Miss Lou Lewis, daughter of a Pole Bearer member, was introduced to Forrest and she presented the former general a bouquet of flowers as a token of reconciliation, peace and good will. On July 5, 1875, Nathan Bedford Forrest delivered this speech:

"Ladies and Gentlemen, I accept the flowers as a memento of reconciliation between the white and colored races of the Southern states. I accept it more particularly as it comes from a colored lady, for if there is any one on God's earth who loves the ladies I believe it is myself. (Immense applause and laughter.) I came here with the jeers of some white people, who think that I am doing wrong. I believe I can exert some influence, and do much to assist the people in strengthening fraternal relations, and shall do all in my power to elevate every man, to depress none.

(Applause.)

I want to elevate you to take positions in law offices, in stores, on farms, and wherever you are capable of going. I have not said anything about politics today. I don't propose to say anything about politics. You have a right to elect whom you please; vote for the man you think best, and I think, when that is done, you and I are freemen. Do as you consider right and honest in electing men for office. I did not come here to make you a long speech, although invited to do so by you. I am not much of a speaker, and my business prevented me from preparing myself. I came to meet you as friends, and welcome you to the white people. I want you to come nearer to us. When I can serve you I will do so. We have but one flag, one country; let us stand together. We may differ in color, but not in sentiment. Many things have been said about me which are wrong, and which white and black persons here, who stood by me through the war, can contradict. Go to work, be industrious, live honestly and act truly, and when you are oppressed I'll come to your relief. I thank you, ladies and gentlemen, for this opportunity you have afforded me to be with you, and to assure you that I am with you in heart and in hand." (Prolonged applause.)

End of speech.

Nathan Bedford Forrest again thanked Miss Lewis for the bouquet and then gave her a kiss on the cheek. Such a kiss was unheard of in the society of those days, in 1875, but it showed a token of respect and friendship between the general and the black community and did much to promote harmony among the citizens of Memphis.

This year, 2012, is the 107th anniversary of the dedication of a General Forrest Statue in Memphis, Tennessee.

In the year of our Lord 1887, efforts were begun to raise the necessary funds to erect a statue to honor Forrest. In 1891, The "Forrest Monument Association" was formed in Memphis. The ladies Auxiliary was formed to help this committee and the United Confederate Veterans helped to raise money. Politician and business folks were the backbone of this committee. The "Who's-Who" of Memphis served on that committee.

The price of the statue to General Forrest was the huge sum of $32,359.53. It should be noted that the ladies auxiliary worked hard to raise $3,000, which was a great deal of money in those days.

In 1901, during the United Confederate Veterans convention in Memphis, the cornerstone of the monument was dedicated. During August of that year Charles H. Nichaus was given the contract to build a bronze casting of the statue. The statue was produced in Paris, France and was shipped to New York, then to Savannah, Georgia, and finally by rail to Memphis, Tennessee.

In 1904, the son of General Forrest, Captain William Montgomery Forrest gave the Forrest Monument Association permission to re-inter the remains of his father Nathan and mother Mary at Forrest Park where the statue would be dedicated the following year.

There was a full moon on Monday, May 15, and on Tuesday, May 16, 1905, over 30,000 people congregated at Forrest Park in Memphis to take part in the statue dedication. The memorial began at 2:30PM with many speeches of tribute to the general and was finalized with General Forrest's granddaughter pulling the cord that unveiled the larger than life statue. This was preceded by the reverent playing of everyone's favorite song from North and South "Dixie"

Wonderful words are inscribed on the Forrest monument that was written by Mrs. Virginia Frazer Boyer, "Those hoof beats upon crimson's sod, but will ring through her song and her story; He fought like a Titan and struck like a god, and his dust is our ashes of glory.”

The War Between the States Sesquicentennial, 150th Anniversary, runs 2011 through 2015. The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans joins the nation in remembering this historic time in our nation’s history. See information at: http://www.150wbts.org/

God Bless America and Have a Dixie Day!

1 posted on 07/13/2012 2:15:01 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

The thought that rebel cavalry was anywhere near would make union infantry quiver. Union cavalry made rebel troops laugh.


2 posted on 07/13/2012 2:21:22 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555


Run Forrest!
3 posted on 07/13/2012 2:21:27 PM PDT by slumber1 (Don't taze me bro!)
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To: BigReb555

4 posted on 07/13/2012 2:26:43 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

“The thought that rebel cavalry was anywhere near would make union infantry quiver. Union cavalry made rebel troops laugh.”

That was true at the beginning of the war. By the time of the Battle of Gettysburg, that was no longer true.


5 posted on 07/13/2012 2:27:04 PM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: BigReb555
Thank you for this post.

No day is wasted where I've learned something new.

6 posted on 07/13/2012 2:29:25 PM PDT by stormhill
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To: slumber1

Hah!


7 posted on 07/13/2012 2:31:21 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To: BigReb555

Thee is a body of opinion among some, and I tend to agree, that had Forrest gotten command in the Western theater after A.S. Johnston’s death, the Battle of Shiloh, and maybe the whole western theater would have had a totally different outcome. But both sides had their share of idiots in command.


8 posted on 07/13/2012 2:32:17 PM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: BigReb555
Forrest was indeed a military genius, easily ranking with Grant, Lee, and Jackson as outstanding General Officers of the Civil War.

He is remembered in the North for the massacre at Fort Pillow.

9 posted on 07/13/2012 2:35:26 PM PDT by TonyInOhio ("If we want to get rid of Obamacare, we're going to have to replace President Obama.")
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To: BigReb555
The Confederate Cavalry’s extensive use of shotguns is frequently attributed to the Confederacy’s severe shortage of firearms early in the war. However, this is not the only reason. As early as August of 1861 the shotguns long term use was foreseen; Captain of Ordnance Wm. R. Hunt wrote to the Secretary of War from Memphis, recommending that contracts be let for 10,000 sword bayonets for double barreled shotguns. Nearly a year later Hunt wrote to Secretary of War J. P. Benjamin, “Colonel Forrest, the most efficient cavalry officer in this department, informs me that the double barrel shotgun is the best gun with which the cavalry can be armed.” A more qualified endorsement of the shotguns use could not be desired; it was the most efficient short range arm used during the war. As late as July 24, 1863, South Carolina Governor Milledge Bonham opines to Confederate Secretary of War Seddon that South Carolina had turned over all of her shotguns to the Confederacy.
10 posted on 07/13/2012 2:43:00 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: NathanBedfordForrest

ping. They’re talking about you.


11 posted on 07/13/2012 2:43:36 PM PDT by marron
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To: BigReb555

As a field commander there was none his equal on horseback.

With infantry, Longstreet was incredible.

With relentless resolve one name stands — Grant.


12 posted on 07/13/2012 2:45:32 PM PDT by KC Burke (Plain Conservative opinions and common sense correction for thirteen years.)
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To: KC Burke

Troops that fought under Stonewall Jackson generally hated him except for one thing, If he led them in a fight, they knew they were going to win.


13 posted on 07/13/2012 2:48:22 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555

For later-—

Years ago, MTSU’s (outside of Nashville) mascot used to be the Blue Raider (raided blue bellies)—Which was Forrest mounted on a rearing charger. Now they have some sissy looking blue horse with wings—we call the MTSU Blue Raiders the “Gay Raiders” anymore.


14 posted on 07/13/2012 2:50:42 PM PDT by WKUHilltopper (And yet...we continue to tolerate this crap...)
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To: nathanbedford

ping


15 posted on 07/13/2012 2:59:35 PM PDT by marron
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To: central_va
"The thought that rebel cavalry was anywhere near would make union infantry quiver."

No wonder the union infantry didn't quiver at Gettysburg. What day did Stuart finally decide to show up for the battle?

16 posted on 07/13/2012 3:01:33 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: central_va

For infantry that today we might call “light” due to sizing and horsed support that old hand-in-the-air Presbyterian was a slave driver of troops without equal as well.

The south had the field commanders that’s for sure. On the Union side the list is short but there are a few. Sherman, Sheridan, Chamberlin and the “Rock of Chickamauga” come readily to mind.

Both sides had junior officers and infantry brave beyond belief.

Both sides had a good number of fools and scroundrals.


17 posted on 07/13/2012 3:04:54 PM PDT by KC Burke (Plain Conservative opinions and common sense correction for thirteen years.)
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To: nathanbedford

ping


18 posted on 07/13/2012 3:18:42 PM PDT by tarheelswamprat
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To: TonyInOhio
IMNSVHO, The best general officer of the Civil War on either side was General George H. Thomas.

Grant finally said so, even in his self-serving memoirs. Lee said so. Lincoln said so. And the historical record says so.

He prevailed in every engagement with which he was involved. He masterminded the "perfect battle:" The Battle of Nashville, the resounding Union victory that led directly to Appomattox. It is studied to this day, unlike the life-wasting blunderings of the drunken Grant.

He was a master of Training, Logistics, Signals, and Mobility. Under his command, Wilson's cavalry achieved the peak of civil war efficiency and fire power and Thomas integrated it closely with Infantry and Artillery better than any other commander. He cared little about was PR and intrigue, at which Sherman, Schofield, and their buddy Grant were masters.

19 posted on 07/13/2012 3:20:05 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: KC Burke
I would rate it this way:
  1. Artillery: Without question Union artillery was superior in every way. It was feared by Confederate Infantry for good reason.
  2. Cavalry: Confederate Cavalry was superior, but waned towards the end.
  3. Infantry: - tie.

20 posted on 07/13/2012 3:26:09 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: Kenny Bunk
Thomas was responsible for not allowing the Confederates to bag and capture the entire Union Army at Chickamauga on Snodgrass Hill. I agree that Thomas was a capable and efficient Union officer (a Virginian too) but if Forrest would have had the equipment and men at his disposal as did Thomas, it would have been different. A close friend of mine owns Thomas’ swords from his West Point years, his service swords between graduation and the Civil War, and his swords from the Civil War. It is humbling to see them and handle them.
21 posted on 07/13/2012 3:34:09 PM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: BigReb555

Thanks for posting this. RIP General Forrest


22 posted on 07/13/2012 4:00:10 PM PDT by antisocial (Texas SCV - Deo Vindice)
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To: Kenny Bunk

Thomas was a great leader and humble man. Having said that, he was also a traitor to the South and Virginia. Post war he was not well liked by anyone, rightly or wrongly, nobody really likes a turn coat, even a useful one.


23 posted on 07/13/2012 4:06:56 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: BigReb555

What’s your opinion of Wade Hampton as a cavalry commander?

Was he used effectively against Sherman’s march?

No requirement to answer on your part. I’ve been reading a book and I’m pondering if Hampton had been used differently, could Hampton’s cavalry have turned one of Sherman’s columns and made them vulnerable to attack.


24 posted on 07/13/2012 4:21:36 PM PDT by sergeantdave (Public unions exist to protect the unions from the taxpaying public)
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To: Kenny Bunk

Thomas didn’t get a fair shake by the post war era or history.
But it pales in comparison to the lying war to protect the Marble Man waged against Longstreet. Early especially covered his failing by scapegoating Longstreet.


25 posted on 07/13/2012 4:32:02 PM PDT by KC Burke (Plain Conservative opinions and common sense correction for thirteen years.)
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To: central_va
General Jubal Early opined that the Union Artillery was much better than the Confederate at longer ranges, but that at close range, in tactical support of combat operations, he thought the Confederate Artillery far superior, more mobile.

To judge from his memoirs, Early was an immensely practical, reliable, and honest reporter. In fact, General Lee depended upon his notes and records for his own memoirs. For example, Early credited the Union Cavalry for the improvements he saw it making during the war.

One thing you'll get from his memoirs was the terrible burden material shortages caused the Confederates. Not only were their resources fewer, but their systems and supply personnel were very weak at the top. The Confederates worked their amazing successes on the field with empty bellies!

26 posted on 07/13/2012 4:48:10 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: Joe 6-pack
I am a die-hard Yankee and even I, jaundiced as I am, don't blame Gettysburg on Stuart. The real Confederate culprits IMHO, were A.P. Hill who brought on the general battle before Lee wanted it to start, i.e., before he was ready ... and Longsteeet, whose heart wasn't in this one... and whose battle plan was infinitely superior to Lee's on that day.

I do agree that it would have been handy to have him around. A.P. Hill attacked, perhaps, because he thought Stuart was never going to show up with the info they needed.

27 posted on 07/13/2012 4:53:39 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: KC Burke
......the lying war to protect the Marble Man waged against Longstreet.....

Lee was a brilliant General. But no mortal could possibly be as good at anything as the rabid Lee fans make him out to be. Lee himself was very supportive of Longstreet, I think, and had nothing but praise for him.

28 posted on 07/13/2012 4:57:16 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: Kenny Bunk

There is not many instances, perhaps none, even up to the very last day, of a confederate unit completely running out of ammunition. Not so for rations...


29 posted on 07/13/2012 5:01:19 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va
.... traitor to the South and Virginia.

Well, Thomas may have been a secret abolitionist!

His record during reconstruction as a military governor was praised on all sides. And that story about his family turning his picture to the wall when he stayed blue turns out to be bogus!

Oddly enough, his being a Virginian was what got him crosswise in the road with the Ohio boys, Grant and Sherman. Sherman's brother was an enormously influential Senator who mafe sure the Ohio people got their way!

30 posted on 07/13/2012 5:03:21 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: KC Burke

Longstreet seems like a 20th century man transported back in time to fight a 19th century war.


31 posted on 07/13/2012 5:03:46 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: TonyInOhio
You need to put “massacre” in quotes. If you know anything about Forrest it was not a massacre. There were quite a number of survivors. If N.B. wanted to kill them all rest assured he would have. Casualties were high but much of the real slaughter happened as the Yanks fled from the fort to the bottoms near the river. There was lots of bad blood between the combatants as this was truly a case where west Tennessee men fought on both sides. Old scores were settled. The Union jumped on the battle and called it a massacre. IF I ever finish my book on the battle I'll send you a copy.
I am working on one theory of the battle and it is panning out but I need a lot of time to travel to pull the research together. My health has sucked and it is hard to find the money to get to the places I need to get to.
32 posted on 07/13/2012 5:04:53 PM PDT by prof.h.mandingo (Buck v. Bell (1927) An idea whose time has come (for extreme liberalism))
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To: central_va
I may be wrong but the railroad cut at the Battle of Second Manassas some of Jackson's troops repelled a Union assault with rocks. Aid got up quickly but at first it was rocks only. That is the only time I can think of.
33 posted on 07/13/2012 5:09:56 PM PDT by prof.h.mandingo (Buck v. Bell (1927) An idea whose time has come (for extreme liberalism))
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To: Daveinyork
That would have been absurd. Forrest was still mostly unknown after Shiloh.

But if he had gotten the command after Joe Johnson, or if Stephen Lee hadn't kept him in Mississippi when Forrest went out to cut Sherman's supply lines, things might well have been different.

34 posted on 07/13/2012 5:12:01 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: central_va
If he led them in a fight, they knew they were going to win.

Otherwise, he would just run away.

35 posted on 07/13/2012 5:12:42 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
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To: KC Burke
With relentless resolve one name stands — Grant.

With endless resources one name stands — Grant.

36 posted on 07/13/2012 5:14:23 PM PDT by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: central_va
Cavalry: Confederate Cavalry was superior, but waned towards the end.

They were like the Japanese naval aviators in World War II. Once the experienced ones got killed, there was no one to replace them.

37 posted on 07/13/2012 5:16:07 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
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To: prof.h.mandingo

I think there is a story about Rebs throwing bricks at a Union charge at the end of the Petersburg Campaign but I believe it was intentional.


38 posted on 07/13/2012 5:18:23 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: reg45
They were like the Japanese naval aviators in World War II. Once the experienced ones got killed, there was no one to replace them.

It was more the horses, rebs had to supply their own. After a mount was killed, if your family couldn't send you a new one, you were transfered to the infantry.

39 posted on 07/13/2012 5:20:42 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va
Troops that fought under Stonewall Jackson...

Why would they have named a General after a gay bar?

40 posted on 07/13/2012 5:20:57 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
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To: central_va

There is 1 battle that comes to mind..

The Last Trench
by Louis Beam


41 posted on 07/13/2012 5:28:27 PM PDT by triSranch ( Home of J.C. Calhoun and the Birthplace and Deathbed of the Confederacy)
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To: central_va
I am using two sources today: Jubal Early's Memoirs, and Benson Bobrick's "Master of War."

General Early says that the Union Army was a primary source of tactical munitions, but he also supports your point. Rations of course were another matter. The Confederates were all too often forced to live off the land and plundered Union stores. BTW, I got carried away on this thread. Nathan Bedford Forrest was an incredibly strong and inspiring tactical leader and a great strategist. Given more support and better commanders, western operations could well have gone the Confederate way with Forrest as the cutting edge.

He clearly seemed to have a better appreciation of the biog picture than the commanders under which he served. E.G., Had Hood permitted him to go after Schofield as he was withdrawing from Franklin, the Battle of Nashville could have gone the other way ... maybe. Hood delayed him too long, and he was beaten back.

Happy Birthday to him!

42 posted on 07/13/2012 5:28:53 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: Kenny Bunk
Stuart screwed up but I agree A.P. Hill was more responsible. Of course if you want the real reason for the loss you have to look to Ewell on the first day. Lee was in a position to roll up the entire Army of the Potomac but Ewell held back and allowed the Yanks to fortify Cemetery Hill. Lee really missed Jackson on that day. The Army of the Potomac was scattered and most of Lee's men were in perfect position to sweep the field. Hill screwed up the second days battle.
If you want an interesting take on the battle read “Last Chance for Victory”. It presents Longstreet in a much better light. He handled his part of the second days battle perfectly.
I don't know if you are aware but Reb troops were on Cemetery hill the evening of the second days battle. Meade had stripped his entire line to fend of Longstreet. It was as Lee planned and Hill failed to support the attack as ordered and the unsupported Rebs were driven back thus bringing on the tragic third days battle.
43 posted on 07/13/2012 5:34:59 PM PDT by prof.h.mandingo (Buck v. Bell (1927) An idea whose time has come (for extreme liberalism))
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To: reg45

“They were like the Japanese naval aviators in World War II. Once the experienced ones got killed, there was no one to replace them.”

People forget what a meat grinder the CW was. A historic turning point in warfare that pitched closely spaced, massed formation against modern weapons, cartridge repeaters, etc. European Generals studied our CW and came up with strategies that resulted in the trench warfare of WWI.

Evolving to modern times we have widely spaced, but highly mobile forces like the Conf. Cav of old that can converge and disperse rapidly, mitigating the effect of modern weapon systems and superior number opposition forces.


44 posted on 07/13/2012 5:37:42 PM PDT by Forty-Niner (The barely bare, berry bear formerly known as..........Ursus Arctos Horribilis.)
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To: All

I had a Nigerian coworker that borrowed many of my books on the CW. He was the president of the local Zumunta Assn, a cultural exchange thing with Nigeria. He had a local black female techer ask him about who he admired most from our history. When he included NBF she became outraged! He calmly told her the thruth about his history. She didn’t believe it. Typical...


45 posted on 07/13/2012 5:43:26 PM PDT by Antoninus II
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To: prof.h.mandingo
Great post. Plenty of Confederate blame to go 'round on that day. Lee told Ewell to occupy Cemetery Ridge "If practicable!" Reckon he thought it wasn't.

Lee wasn't at his best that 1st day, either. Vicious case of dysentery. A.P. Hill was a charismatic commander, but it's my impression that he was much too impetuous and liable to go off half-cocked, screwing up Lee's well laid plans ... and this wasn't the first time either. His over-aggressiveness goes back to First Manassas and then his service under Jackson.

He also seemed quite careless of casualties, which Lee always thought to minimize by maneuver rather than direct assault.

Have you been to the battlefield?

46 posted on 07/13/2012 5:48:55 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: Kenny Bunk
Have you been to the battlefield?

I have had the privilege of riding horseback over the entire battlefields of Shiloh, Ft. Donelson, Chickamauga, Stones River, Kennesaw Mountain, and Gettysburg to name a few and several that are not included in the Military Park System..Britton's Lane, Middleburg, Hatchie Bridge, Corinth, Brice's Crossroads, Harrisburg...I also was able to cover Gettysburg and experience it as a member of a six horse artillery hitch. It gives one quite a perspective about the terrain and the battle.

47 posted on 07/13/2012 6:43:04 PM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: vetvetdoug
Antietam is a very well preserved battle field and I had the pleasure of living nearby, with Gettysburg "up the road apiece.". The battlefield aside, where of course no disturbance is allowed, the whole surrounding area had been picketed and patrolled for so long that there was a lot of stuff lying about that got plowed up. Many a local farmer had his own little museum in his parlor, In fact, in Williamsport, there is a local business that does nothing but sell metal detectors.

At dusk on the anniversary of the great battle, 21,000 luminaria line the roads to symbolize the casualties of the day. But I envy your horseback look at these battlegrounds. One really understands so much more that way.

What is your re-enactment unit?

48 posted on 07/13/2012 11:26:15 PM PDT by Kenny Bunk (So, Scalia, Alito, Thomas, and FU Roberts can't figure out if Obama is a Natural Born Citizen?)
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To: Kenny Bunk
It is on the “bucket list”. I hope to perhaps, Good Lord willing, be in the area for the 150th in 2013 but my cousin passed away recently and there went my condo in Alexandria, Va.
It was my impression that Hill was perhaps suffering from VD picked up in the Mexican War. He was uncharacteristically reticent to attack as in former engagements. As was Ewell. He was a firebrand under Jackson. I think he was not really over the loss of his leg. If I remember correctly Ewell redeemed himself in the Wilderness. The battle of Gettysburg is one of those eerie battles that seem preordained from the beginning. The more I study it (going on fifty years)the more I get a cold chill.
If you are into the Revolution check out Yorktown. Strange things happened there also. I mean the French fleet held off the British fleet. THE FRENCH. LOL. A freak storm held up the British fleet in New York harbor. There are other instances during the siege. Cue Twilight Zone music.
49 posted on 07/14/2012 4:32:17 AM PDT by prof.h.mandingo (Buck v. Bell (1927) An idea whose time has come (for extreme liberalism))
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To: BigReb555

Thanks for the GREAT POST. Read my comments if you like on Fort Pillow. Thanks again for the post.


50 posted on 07/14/2012 4:41:27 AM PDT by prof.h.mandingo (Buck v. Bell (1927) An idea whose time has come (for extreme liberalism))
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