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Family says accused soldier needs PTSD treatment, not punishment
Star-Telegram ^ | Jul. 13, 2012 | By Chris Vaughn

Posted on 07/14/2012 8:35:48 AM PDT by huldah1776

"The commanding general of the 18th Airborne Corps, Lt. Gen. Frank Helmick, has agreed to take jurisdiction of Eisenhauer's criminal case, but only if Cumberland County District Attorney William West asks.

"We worked very hard to convince the military that the fair and appropriate thing for them to do was request prosecutorial jurisdiction, and they have agreed to do that," said Mark Waple, Eisenhauer's attorney and a West Point-educated former Army attorney. "Now the ball is in the court of the Cumberland County district attorney's office. We hope to have a response from them within the next few days. What happens next depends on what that response is."

(Excerpt) Read more at star-telegram.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government
KEYWORDS: afghanistan; ptsd; veterans; wot
My comment at site:

"First of all, what is up with this being put under the manufacturing industry topic? Who is the shmuck responsible for practicing his freedom of speech that was protected by this young man, Josh? and the Tags? district attorneys and shoot out tournament? What a disgrace to this paper! ...[I have contacted the author and the online editor]

The parents of this fine young man need to contact the politicians. I looked for support groups on the internet for those of you suffering from PTS and there are NONE.

Is this administration not doing anything about this because they do not want to help the warriors but want them to suffer alone? This tears the fabric of the military, and those in the military vow to defend the Constitution that this administration ignores and abhors. This is NOT a coincidence!

1 posted on 07/14/2012 8:35:55 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: huldah1776

“As far as we can tell from his medical records, he had very few therapy sessions and was unfortunately being treated with anti-anxiety medications, specifically benzodiazepines,” Waple said.

Benzodiazepines are classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration as depressants, and they are known for creating addiction. Large doses, or chronic doses, are “associated with amnesia, hostility, irritability, and vivid or disturbing dreams,” according to the DEA.

Alarmed by increasing abuse of the drugs within the Army and accidental overdoses by soldiers on complex drug cocktails, the Army surgeon general released new standards this spring that stop the use of the drugs to treat post-traumatic stress.”

We are going to keep seeing this story repeated unless and until the Military cleans these crap, emotional and perceptual distorting drugs removed and completely banned.


2 posted on 07/14/2012 8:46:11 AM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: huldah1776

http://www.navytimes.com/news/2010/09/military-psych-meds-080910/

“Psych meds spike among younger troops
By Andrew Tilghman and Brendan McGarry - Staff writers
Posted : Friday Sep 3, 2010 11:57:21 EDT
Use of psychiatric medications among people ages 18 to 34 — mostly active-duty troops and their spouses — is rising at a significantly higher rate than other age groups in the military health care system, according to data newly released to Military Times.

Overall, the number of prescriptions filled for psychiatric medications rose 42 percent from 2005 to 2009 among Tricare beneficiaries in that age group, according to data provided by Tricare Management Activity in response to a Freedom of Information Act request.

That compares to an increase of 24 percent among Tricare beneficiaries ages 45 to 64, mostly retirees. For children 17 and younger, the increase was 18 percent.”

We didn’t see the increase in this type of behavior from returning WWII vets. We are creating it to sell drugs and its gotten so out of control that the Russians are studying it as a weakness in our National Security.

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/02/10/murder-in-tampa-studied-by-russian-president-medvedev/


3 posted on 07/14/2012 9:23:00 AM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: huldah1776
From what I've read about this case (which,admittedly,isn't much) it would be wrong to hold this guy to blame,legally *or* morally,for his acts.Is this a damn tragic case? You betcha! But don't compound it by charging one of its victims.
4 posted on 07/14/2012 9:28:54 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Jimmy Carter Is No Longer The Worst President Of My Lifetime)
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To: huldah1776

Ok, There is something that has interested me for along time and something I do not get.
For the last 20 years or so we hear frequently about PTSD being prevalent in our soldiers.
How come our parents never heard about PTSD after WWI or WWII or Korea and not even the beginning of Nam? Nam we started hearing about it towards the end.
It’s just a curiosity.
My Dad and his brothers all served in WWII as did my fatherIL, my uncle served in Korea and early Nam, I do not remember any of them talking about this, or their friends.
So what is different now?


5 posted on 07/14/2012 9:31:44 AM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: svcw

Because it was called “shell shocked” then, and the community provided the support. Are you really surprised that it turned to s-— when the Government took control? Semper Fi


6 posted on 07/14/2012 9:43:25 AM PDT by gunner03
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To: svcw

I think that in those days it was called, “shell shock”.


7 posted on 07/14/2012 9:48:35 AM PDT by Gator113 (***YOU GAVE it to Obama. I would have voted for NEWT.~Just livin' life, my way~)
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To: svcw

They had different terms for it: “shell shock,” “combat fatigue,” “lack of moral fiber (in the RAF)”, and so on.

And no, we didn’t talk about it much; still don’t, with those who have not shared the combat experience.


8 posted on 07/14/2012 9:50:22 AM PDT by VietVet (I am old enough to know who I am and what I believe, and I 'm not inclined to apologize for any of)
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To: gunner03

Its a drug deal, period.

http://psychrights.org/2011/110822VASpent717MilOnIneffectiveRisperdal.htm

And that’s what Always you get when Government takes over.

S-—, and crushing, crony capitalist expense.


9 posted on 07/14/2012 9:54:32 AM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: VietVet

“with those who have not shared the combat experience.”

Exactly!

The only way this generation is going to deal Effectively with what’s bothering them is the same way Previous generations have dealt with the same issues.

Goofballs with a medical degree in pushing drugs to counteract the bad effects of the last goofball’s drugs are just compounding the negatives.


10 posted on 07/14/2012 10:03:39 AM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: svcw
How come our parents never heard about PTSD after WWI or WWII or Korea
PTSD has existed as long as there have been wars. However, recognizing it and labeling it have usually had different results over the years.
Since WWI, it was usually defined as shell shock or combat/battle fatigue. George Patton wasn't the only one calling it cowardice and there was a hell of a stigma attached to it. That's why no one talked about it.
In 'Nam, it was evident right there on the battle field - known as the 1000 yard stare. Believe me, I know.
IMO, everyone who's been in combat suffers from it to some degree. How we dealt with it after the fact is the answer as to how we learned to cope with it.
For most, just talking about our experiences (to anyone) helped immensely. But for some, professional help was (is) required.
Personally, I think drugs are the wrong way to go.
11 posted on 07/14/2012 10:11:01 AM PDT by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: VietVet
"And no, we didn’t talk about it much; still don’t, with those who have not shared the combat experience."

And those who did talk openingly about their "war" experience, especially in bars, would always turn out to be REMF's.

Many combat vets never knew they had "it" until they retired and weren't as busy as they used to be. Many self medicated, especially with alcohol for many years.

Most trained warriors never want to believe they have weakness's especially of the mental/emotional varity.

Been there, done that, and still doing it.

Thanks for your service and welcome home brother!

12 posted on 07/14/2012 11:42:14 AM PDT by ImpBill ("America, where are you now?" - Little "r" republican!)
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To: svcw

It was called shell shock in WW1 from when they fought in the trenches and just bombed the h... out of each other. WW2 also had reports of it. The difference today is that there is a higher percentage of survivors? I don’t know that for sure.

Also, those who have had a traumatic experience before the war, divorce, abuse, auto accident, rape, will have a proportionately higher chance of deeper repercussions after another trauma. The wounds heal for many, but the protective scar tissue is not stronger as in a bone break.

Which also brings us to multiple tours. Those with the most experience will be asked to lead. Makes sense, but again, multiple traumas can lead to more problems. Because civilians also experience PTS there are good therapies out there, but we are talking government programs, not private top of the line psychiatry.


13 posted on 07/14/2012 12:07:56 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: VietVet

What would be the best way to get someone to get help. Veteran with veteran? And how do we find those who are suffering in silence?


14 posted on 07/14/2012 12:11:24 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: VietVet
In WW2 the Germans treated Combat Fatigue with sleep, they knocked them out with drugs, and a return of the trooper to their Units and Mates, after the battle.

I read the “The Thin Red Line” years after I returned from my Second Tour in VN, the book describes combat stress and the after battle reaction accurately.

15 posted on 07/14/2012 12:41:15 PM PDT by Little Bill
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To: huldah1776

Thanks for posting this. Josh sure needs our help.

Here is a link to the video that details Josh’s situation: http://youtu.be/Pvr8SBu0dLg


16 posted on 07/14/2012 12:51:05 PM PDT by tired&retired
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To: To-Whose-Benefit?

Excellent comments.

If you go to the website set up to help soldiers like Josh, there is a copy of the Army Chief of Medical
command explaining that benzodiazapines not only do not help PTSD but they make it worse!

Link here: http://saveoursoldiers.org/

It’s the April 10, 2012 memo under the PTSD Tab


17 posted on 07/14/2012 1:01:53 PM PDT by tired&retired
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To: svcw

It was called “shell shocked” in earlier wars, and was somewhat common knowledge that it happened.


18 posted on 07/14/2012 1:17:29 PM PDT by PghBaldy (I eagerly await the next news about the struggles of Elizabeth Sacheen Littlefeather Warren.)
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To: huldah1776

Multiple tours are an interesting thing, really.
In older wars, you were there until it was over.
Maybe that’s part of the problem, we have politicians fighting wars now, instead of military - people who actually like victory.
So as a soldier, you saw the end before and now there is no end.


19 posted on 07/14/2012 1:33:00 PM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: huldah1776

“What would be the best way to get someone to get help?”

We all deal with the stress and the memories differently. For example, my brother-in-law just wouldn’t talk to anyone for 20 years, until my wife brought me home to meet the family. So sometimes getting together with other vets can help, even if you don’t talk about the war (we didn’t).


20 posted on 07/14/2012 9:53:20 PM PDT by VietVet (I am old enough to know who I am and what I believe, and I 'm not inclined to apologize for any of)
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To: svcw
Ok, There is something that has interested me for along time and something I do not get.
For the last 20 years or so we hear frequently about PTSD being prevalent in our soldiers.
How come our parents never heard about PTSD after WWI or WWII or Korea and not even the beginning of Nam? Nam we started hearing about it towards the end. It’s just a curiosity.
My Dad and his brothers all served in WWII as did my fatherIL, my uncle served in Korea and early Nam, I do not remember any of them talking about this, or their friends.
So what is different now?

My completely unsubstantiated intuitive theory is this: most simply it is that the soldiers are put into service told that they are fighting for certain ideals, that they are the protector of those ideals. Then they return to their country to see it not only devoid of those ideals, but those ideals actively suppressed.

Legal theory, for instance: they are told that they are under no obligation to follow illegal orders and that the Constitution is the highest law of the land... yet their whole organization, their whole society, is actively geared against them acting against the biggest threat to that Constitution: their own government. The "line" is always two steps away, and while society tells them it's two steps in front they know it's two steps crossed.

The cognitive dissonance is enormous, the separation from "normal people" is itself normal because "normal people" wouldn't feel both used and betrayed because "normal people" know that everything is fine, that the government really is acting in accordance with the Constitution. So obviously it must be the soldier that is wrong

I know I felt betrayed and impotent and... useless when I came back from Iraq in 2008, just in time to catch Obama's election and TARP. That election was particularly disturbing because it illustrated the "just shut up" attitude given by those in power to those concerned about upholding the Constitution.

21 posted on 07/14/2012 10:04:48 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: OneWingedShark

Ok.
Your reply to me makes sense and it made me cry - damn you.
I wept with soldiers returning from Nam who were spat upon - what the hell has happened.
(OK enough of self pity)
Moving forward, fighting to the death for people who love and UNDERSTAND who the USA actually is.
Thank you for your service.
My Dad lost an arm in WWII and he was considered a hero. To me he was “Captain Hook” we always played Peter Pan, I was a kid. As an adult I knew what he sacrificed, and he was willing.
I have family in special forces, Air Force and the Navy, I know what they give. I love them for it, yet weep they do not receive the same appreciation my Dad, uncles and fatherIL received.
The service today is not less important.
Thank you for your service, I salute you.
I am so very sorry you and other like you do not receive the honor and respect you deserve.
I apologize for America.


22 posted on 07/14/2012 10:18:56 PM PDT by svcw (If one living cell on another planet is life, why isn't it life in the womb?)
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To: svcw
Ok.
Your reply to me makes sense and it made me cry - damn you.

I'm sorry, didn't mean to make you cry.

I wept with soldiers returning from Nam who were spat upon - what the hell has happened.

I have theories about that too; but I think CS Lewis got it right: talking about "men without chests."

(OK enough of self pity)

It's not just self-pity; the rest of your post shows me some genuine empathy -- and since when did it become "unmanly" to feel remorse/sadness over something bad?

Moving forward, fighting to the death for people who love and UNDERSTAND who the USA actually is.
Thank you for your service.

You're welcome.

My Dad lost an arm in WWII and he was considered a hero. To me he was “Captain Hook” we always played Peter Pan, I was a kid. As an adult I knew what he sacrificed, and he was willing. I have family in special forces, Air Force and the Navy, I know what they give. I love them for it, yet weep they do not receive the same appreciation my Dad, uncles and fatherIL received.

I think that they were perhaps a better quality man than we are today; it is intuitively obvious that the organization that produces the strongest/best individuals is the family; the family has been under attack from government for how long now?

The service today is not less important.
Thank you for your service, I salute you.
I am so very sorry you and other like you do not receive the honor and respect you deserve.

It's ok; I'm [was] one of those REMFs mentioned above. My job was detainee ops, think prison guard with more than a touch of overpaid-scarecrow/underpaid-babysitter. (The really horrible thing about that job is that even if your shift went perfectly you could beat yourself up for the times you caught yourself staring int space or letting the mind wander, etc.)

I apologize for America.

Apology accepted? [Can I do that? Can you apologize on behalf of the country?]
In any case, I think the only way to restore America is to do justice.

Also God says this:
2 Chronicles 7:14 -- Then if my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sins and restore their land.

23 posted on 07/14/2012 10:42:44 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: svcw

PTSD existed after WWII, the Korean War, etc. I had an uncle who went into the Marines and spent all of WWII in the Pacific...fighting island to island. When he finally came back from the war...he took advantage of the GI bill...got educated....became a teacher, and eventually a school principal. In the process, he eventually got divorced and separated from his kids. He drunk to excess. He’d have a beer or two at lunch. He’d have a number of drinks after he left work. And he’d drink throughout the evening hours.

I would add this as well...in the old days...if you were shot, it was a fair chance of you dying. We’ve come to a point where you could suffer some significant wounds, yet survive and live on for decades. The problem is that you probably suffered some emotional issues and those items just aren’t fixable.

PTSD is going to be a major drain on our society for the decades to come. We will blame a lot of things for these GIs and the issues that arise, but we asked for the impossible, and they gave it to us....and we have to accept PTSD as part of the payback.


24 posted on 07/16/2012 3:14:05 AM PDT by pepsionice
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To: VietVet

A large part of it is because in a therapist/client situation, the client HAS to feel that the therapist is empathic or truly knows how the client is feeling. This is really impossible for someone who has not been in combat for 7-20 months! Also, it is that relationship of trust and empathy that creates the healing situation.

If this understanding is so important, and all counselors know that it IS, I think there should be a new type of counseling for PTS, the counselor, the sufferer, and the partner veteran. Just like in group therapy, the counselor guides or however they want to do their “thing”, but this partner veteran should be with the sufferer 24/7. Chosen by the sufferer.

Just an idea and didn’t get much sleep...


25 posted on 07/16/2012 6:55:42 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: tired&retired; Gay State Conservative; svcw; gunner03; Gator113; VietVet; oh8eleven; ImpBill; ...

The drugging of our service people is a monstrous outrage. The Jerks peddling this garbage are all too ready to tell the unsuspecting troops that they should Seek Help. WRONG! The help offered comes with a psychiatric diagnosis of PTSD, which DOES literally Ruin the rest of their lives. It pops up every time they apply for a job. They’re Branded BY the VA and Military Doctors as ticking time bombs.

Almost ALL of these so called picker upper or calmer downer drugs are already down AT the FDA as Causing psychosis, and Psychosis is an Official Diagnosis of schizophrenia. People do not improve from these drugs. They get sicker and sicker, not just in actuality, but on paper as an Official Record they’ll go through all kinds of hell trying to get rid of.

Here’s a VA page on schizophrenia, which is what these drugs produce.

http://www.mirecc.va.gov/visn3/education.asp

“Algorithms:

A review of existing algorithms, including VA National Guidelines, APA, the Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP), and PORT was conducted. After careful consideration, a modified version of TMAP was selected, and named the New Jersey Algorithm.

The sequence includes two trials of atypical antipsychotics followed by a Clozaril trial. If no favorable response is observed, a third atypical neuroleptic is tried, followed by a typical neuroleptic, followed by a combination of antipsychotic medications. The consensus of the internal advisory committee was to provide a flexible algorithm that will allow for minor modifications as new research is disseminated. Though a positive outcome has not been observed with the NJ Algorithm to date, researchers suspect that a larger sample size might generate significant findings in the future.”

VA Serves 5.3 Million Vets and active duty personnel. The commonly accepted incidence of Selling schizophrenia is 1% of the population. Schiz is actually grossly oversold for all manner of reasons, most of which involve Medicare, Medicaid, and Tricare Fraud.

1% of 5.3 Million is 53,000, and the VA hasn’t had a Single Positive Outcome Yet for the most severe diagnosis they’ve got, with ANY of their S**T Drugs. NONE! But the pushers still want even more test subjects.

If you want to know what the New Jersey Algorithm was modified from, here’s the original TMAP.

http://psychrights.org/Drugs/AllenJonesTMAPJanuary20.pdf

The entire horror is a pharmaceutical con job.

We should be giving our returning vets a high five and a thank you, is there anything we can do to help? Instead we’ve auctioned them off to a drug deal, that has had No Positive Outcome, Ever.

And thanks for the link.


26 posted on 07/16/2012 10:03:12 AM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: To-Whose-Benefit?

This is a great post. Could you do a general chat post and get this info out on its own and check VETERANS as one of the key words or categories, plus ping me with it? I’ll try and get this storming, because this is why the MILITARY is having benefits cuts. The colleges are going after veterans and so are the drug companies. (A good psychiatrist charges $300 an hour!) “you don’t think they pay $3000 for a toilet seat, do you?”


27 posted on 07/16/2012 11:43:25 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: huldah1776

There is SO much about this subject that just plain stinks,

Yes, I’ll put something together over the next week to 10 days, probably a header with subsequent comment postings for the live link sets to credible Medical and Scientific sources.

Here’s one to tide you over. Eli Lilly made $65 Billion selling the atypical antipsychotic Zyprexa. Use the search box and scroll down to Zyprexa.

http://lamplightersoftware.com/dsm.php

Top 20 Adverse Drug Reactions reported for Olanzapine and its Brand Names
Adverse Reaction Cases
Diabetes Mellitus 2,313
Weight Increased 1,346
Pancreatitis 972
Hypertension 804
Hyperglycaemia 698
Diabetic Ketoacidosis 588
Diabetes Mellitus Non-Insulin-Dependent 583
Death 578
Metabolic Disorder 576
Blood Triglycerides Increased 562
Obesity 430
Blood Cholesterol Increased 429
Diabetic Coma 387
Blood Glucose Increased 359
Blood Cholesterol Abnormal 343
Vision Blurred 343
Condition Aggravated 320
Weight Decreased 316
Drug Exposure During Pregnancy 302
Myocardial Infarction 288

And those are Only the ones anyone bothered to report because reporting Drug Adverse Events is Voluntary, not Mandatory. Those are Only the US, and the stuff’s sold globally. Those are Only from Jan 2004-Sept 2009. I’ve got a report somewhere from 3 years ago where Zyprexa induced Diabetes topped 22,000 cases.

Here, 94% of Drug AEs never even get reported.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16689555

And here’s the kicker, Dr Grace E. Jackson is a Psychiatrist. She’s one of the very, Very few who are blowing the whistle.
Here’s how Lilly bought Zyprexa(Olanzapine) FDA approval.
http://psychrights.org/States/Alaska/CaseOne/30-Day/ExhibitD-Olanzapine.htm

Read that one and you’ll never trust Anything out of FDA again.


28 posted on 07/16/2012 3:15:13 PM PDT by To-Whose-Benefit? (It is Error alone which needs the support of Government. The Truth can stand by itself.)
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To: To-Whose-Benefit?

Thanks for sharing the link. Allan Jones is a friend of mine. He is one heck of a great guy who stood up to the drug companies against all odds. He has helped a lot of people by pursuing this cause.


29 posted on 07/16/2012 3:51:04 PM PDT by tired&retired
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