Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Eight Badminton Players Kicked Out Of The Olympics For Throwing Matches (Watch Video)
Business Insider ^ | 08/01/2012 | Tony Manfred

Posted on 08/01/2012 2:06:24 PM PDT by SeekAndFind

Eight women's doubles badminton players from China, South Korea, and Indonesia were disqualified today after throwing matches in order to manipulate future match-ups. After the four women's pairs had qualified for the quarterfinals of the tournament, they began intentionally losing games in order to dictate a more favorable match-up in the next round.

The disqualified players included the world champions from China — Wang Xiaoli and Yu Yang, as well as the bronze-medal favorites Ha Jung-eun and Kim Min Jung of South Korea.

So why in the world would they lose on purpose?

Basically, they wanted to avoid playing the 2nd best team in the world in the quarterfinals.

In Olympic badminton, there is a preliminary stage followed by a knockout stage. In the prelim stage, the teams are divided into four, four-team groups and play a round-robin. The top two teams from each group advance to an eight-team, bracket-style knockout tournament. In that knockout tournament, the team that came in 1st in Group A plays the team that came in 2nd in Group B, and so on.

The reason the pairs started losing games in the first place was that the second-best team in the world (Tian Qing & Zhao Yunlei of China) were upset in their group stage and came in 2nd instead of 1st. As a result, Wang/Yu and Ha/Kim tried to lose on purpose so they wouldn't win their group and have to play Tian/Zhao in the next round.

The same thing happened with the other two pairs that were DQ'd.

(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 2012olympics; badminton; olympics

1 posted on 08/01/2012 2:06:33 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

The Match Throw....coming to an Olympics near you.


2 posted on 08/01/2012 2:08:56 PM PDT by GSWarrior
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

I can understand this. I mean, it would be a tragedy if the stadium burned down.


3 posted on 08/01/2012 2:08:58 PM PDT by Opinionated Blowhard ("When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
Badminton.

'nuff said.

4 posted on 08/01/2012 2:09:10 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Woe to them...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

t wouldn’t be the Olympics if the Chi-coms weren’t cheating.


5 posted on 08/01/2012 2:09:37 PM PDT by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

ok, I’ll ask: wtf: badminton, badmitton?


6 posted on 08/01/2012 2:10:52 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Woe to them...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Georgia Girl 2

I am so dumb-—until I read the whole article I thought they were disqualified for literally throwing matches—as in the kind that make fire.


7 posted on 08/01/2012 2:13:21 PM PDT by huckfillary (qual tyo ta)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: the invisib1e hand

SOME TRIVIA ABOUT THE SPORT — BADMINTON

________________________

The beginnings of badminton can be traced to mid-18th century British India, where it was created by British military officers stationed there.

Early photographs show Englishmen adding a net to the traditional English game of battledore and shuttlecock.

Being particularly popular in the British garrison town Poona (now Pune), the game also came to be known as Poona.

Initially, balls of wool referred as ball badminton were preferred by the upper classes in windy or wet conditions, but ultimately the shuttlecock stuck. This game was taken by retired officers back to England where it developed and rules were set out.

Although it appears clear that Badminton House, Gloucestershire, owned by the Duke of Beaufort, has given its name to the sports, it is unclear when and why the name was adopted.

As early as 1860, Isaac Spratt, a London toy dealer, published a booklet, Badminton Battledore – a new game, but unfortunately no copy has survived.

An 1863 article in The Cornhill Magazine describes badminton as “battledore and shuttlecock played with sides, across a string suspended some five feet from the ground”.

This early use has cast doubt on the origin through expatriates in India, though it is known that it was popular there in the 1870s and that the first rules were drawn up in Poonah in 1873.

As early as 1875, veterans returning from India started a club in Folkestone. Until 1887, the sport was played in England under the rules that prevailed in British India. The Bath Badminton Club standardized the rules and made the game applicable to English ideas. J.H.E. Hart drew up revised basic regulations in 1887 and, with Bagnel Wild, again in 1890.

In 1893, the Badminton Association of England published the first set of rules according to these regulations, similar to today’s rules, and officially launched badminton in a house called “Dunbar” at 6 Waverley Grove, Portsmouth, England on September 13 of that year.

They also started the All England Open Badminton Championships, the first badminton competition in the world, in 1899.

The International Badminton Federation (IBF) (now known as Badminton World Federation) was established in 1934 with Canada, Denmark, England, France, the Netherlands, Ireland, New Zealand, Scotland, and Wales as its founding members. India joined as an affiliate in 1936. The BWF now governs international badminton and develops the sport globally.
While initiated in England, competitive men’s badminton in Europe has traditionally been dominated by Denmark.

Asian nations, however, have been the most dominant ones worldwide. Indonesia, South Korea, China, and Malaysia along with Denmark are among the nations that have consistently produced world-class players in the past few decades, with China being the greatest force in both men’s and women’s competition in recent years.


8 posted on 08/01/2012 2:15:44 PM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: the invisib1e hand

LOL!


9 posted on 08/01/2012 2:17:15 PM PDT by funfan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All

Say it ain’t so Wang! SAY IT AIN’T SO!!!!


10 posted on 08/01/2012 2:18:49 PM PDT by Kolath
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Man, that video was embarrassing. Both teams just keep pitifully serving into the net. The umpire calls them to the center of the court to tell them to knock-it-off ... and they start back up almost immediately.

The rules of this sport are obviously screwy ... but, from that video, they were enough of an embarrassment to justify bouncing them.

SnakeDoc


11 posted on 08/01/2012 2:20:31 PM PDT by SnakeDoctor ("I've shot people I like more for less." -- Raylan Givens, Justified)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Dozens of badminton fans around the world are in an uproar over this.


12 posted on 08/01/2012 2:25:18 PM PDT by lurk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SnakeDoctor
"The rules of this sport are obviously screwy..."

The trouble is not the rules of the sport, but the competition format instituted for the Olympics, namely round robin Group Play.

Under a single elimination format, this would never happen.

But under Group Play, top tier teams, who are almost guaranteed to advance to the next round, gain a competitive advantage in next round by avoiding other top teams due to "seeding".

13 posted on 08/01/2012 2:29:19 PM PDT by diogenes ghost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

They are not wanting to lose because of gambling or anything similar . They are wanting to lose for strategic reasons in an effort to obtain the best result for themselves in the overall competition. I think they should be able to just forfeit a match if that is what they want to do. If both teams want to lose, just flip a coin and run like hell to keep the ticket buyers from tearing them apart. Expecting a team to play their best when it is disadvantageous to their overall prospects is the height of political correctness thinking.


14 posted on 08/01/2012 2:34:03 PM PDT by Eleven Bravo 6 319thID
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: huckfillary
I am so dumb-—until I read the whole article I thought they were disqualified for literally throwing matches—as in the kind that make fire.

Well.... depends on what you were watching. Somebody was lighting something.

(from USATODAY.com)

15 posted on 08/01/2012 2:38:12 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Help. How do I put something in my tagline.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: the invisib1e hand
Thank God the integrity of lawn darts is still intact!!! lj
16 posted on 08/01/2012 2:40:35 PM PDT by Kaosinla (The More the Plans Fail. The More the Planners Plan.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
I suppose that being a successful Olympic badminton player in China has its perks - maybe a little gravy on one's rice - but can you imagine what a disqualified badminton player has waiting back for them in good ol' China?
17 posted on 08/01/2012 2:43:55 PM PDT by freedomlover
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

It’s a racket.


18 posted on 08/01/2012 2:50:05 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: freedomlover
"...but can you imagine what a disqualified badminton player has waiting back for them in good ol' China? "

I hope they aren't too attached to their kidneys.

19 posted on 08/01/2012 2:51:06 PM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Badminton? Really?


20 posted on 08/01/2012 2:51:21 PM PDT by RobinOfKingston (The instinct toward liberalism is located in the part of the brain called the rectal lobe.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

I miss the burly, beefy East German women with their overabundance of facial hair.


21 posted on 08/01/2012 3:56:29 PM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill

Poppyco....er....Shuttlecock! (oh, never mind)


22 posted on 08/01/2012 4:38:40 PM PDT by PuzzledInTX
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
I'm not going to pass judgement on these competitors because it seems like the rules actually encouraged this sort of thing.

But this incident reminds me of a great story I heard from some years ago involving two cross-country skiiers from Norway. I may have the names wrong, but I think one of them was the legendary skiier Bjorn Daehlie, who was competing in either 1994 or 1998 for what would have been a record number of career gold medals in cross-country events.

The story, as I remember it, was told by Thomas Alsgaard, who was about five years younger than Daehlie and was competing against him in the race. Daehlie was a national hero in Norway, and Alsgaard was in the lead late in the race. He didn't want to win the race and actually slowed down to let Daehlie catch up, until he heard Daehlie scolding him from several yards behind. The story as I remember it was that Daehlie told him that if he (Daehlie) won the race, he'd wait at the finish line for Alsgaard and then kick his @ss for settling for second place.

This is the kind of thing that legends are made of. Alsgaard won the gold medal, Daehlie got the silver, and they're both champions no matter how you look at it.

23 posted on 08/01/2012 5:32:54 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("If you touch my junk, I'm gonna have you arrested.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
"This is why we can't have goodminton, people" -- Andy Levy, Red Eye
24 posted on 08/02/2012 2:56:14 PM PDT by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
It’s a racket.

For years now, there have been rumors of mob influence in fixing badminton games in this country. Yes, the mob has made millions from drugs, prostitution, and loan sharking, but badminton is where the real money is.

25 posted on 08/02/2012 3:07:12 PM PDT by GreenHornet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson