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Planning My Techie Daughter's Homeschooling...Need tech advice..Following Charles Murray
08.02.12 | Chickensoup

Posted on 08/02/2012 1:39:23 PM PDT by Chickensoup

I am homeschooling a daughter this year. She is bright (the mid 120s) and a little Asperger-ish. She loves tech nothing brings her joy like cracking into one of the laptops and repairing it.

She is looking at high school and for a variety of reasons she will need to have a portion of her schooling homeschooled. This gal wants to get going on growing up and living and I don’t think that college is in her future.

Rereading Charles Murray's book on REAL EDUCATION has inspired me to try to put together a curriculum that includes some education to achieve certifications in one or more technical computer-related area.

Advice appreciated

Tech ping please?

Homeschool ping please?

Thank you


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: school; tech; vanity
I am homeschooling a daughter this year. She is bright (the mid 120s) and a little Asperger-ish. She loves tech nothing brings her joy like cracking into one of the laptops and repairing it.

She is looking at high school and for a variety of reasons she will need to have a portion of her schooling homeschooled. This gal wants to get going on growing up and living and I don’t think that college is in her future.

Rereading Charles Murray's book on REAL EDUCATION has inspired me to try to put together a curriculum that includes some education to achieve certifications in one or more technical computer-related area.

Advice appreciated

Tech ping please?

Homeschool ping please?

Thank you

1 posted on 08/02/2012 1:39:38 PM PDT by Chickensoup
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To: Chickensoup

Why don’t you think college is in her future? (if it’s okay to ask)


2 posted on 08/02/2012 1:43:55 PM PDT by EEGator
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To: Chickensoup

The best way to learn is to teach. Have her homeschool you.


3 posted on 08/02/2012 1:43:55 PM PDT by Berlin_Freeper (Siri: USA - ALL THE WAY!)
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To: Chickensoup
A ham radio license may appeal to her, and she'll actually have to learn some basic electronics and pass the tests.

I understand morse code isn't required anymore (spit).

/johnny

4 posted on 08/02/2012 1:49:42 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Chickensoup

Be wary. The days of certifications with no diploma behind them leading to employment in the tech world are disappearing. More and more employers are wanting degrees first, and certs second. It’s not like the 1990’s where a novell certification was a gold card, and no other education required. These days even the techs at Fry’s all have degrees.


5 posted on 08/02/2012 1:51:21 PM PDT by Melas (u)
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To: EEGator

She is bright but lacks the interest and motivaation for a four year degree. If you read the Murray book you will see that there are tons of people who do best working in a field that they have interest in rather that doing mediocre work in an area that they think is punching a ticket.

And college is ticket-punching for many people.


6 posted on 08/02/2012 1:53:32 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Berlin_Freeper

The best way to learn is to teach. Have her homeschool you.

__________________________

You mean I would learn something? How would FR get along without my screeching Tech Ping posts asking the geniuses to again save me from another way I have landed my very cute a** in a technical sling?


7 posted on 08/02/2012 1:56:11 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Melas

Be wary. The days of certifications with no diploma behind them leading to employment in the tech world are disappearing. More and more employers are wanting degrees first, and certs second. It’s not like the 1990’s where a novell certification was a gold card, and no other education required. These days even the techs at Fry’s all have degrees.
_______________________________

I am wondering about that. Thank you


8 posted on 08/02/2012 1:58:49 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Chickensoup

Do a search for “girls science camp” and your area. You’ll find everything from Microsoft computer science camp for girls only to local science and tech programs for homeschoolers.


9 posted on 08/02/2012 1:59:22 PM PDT by tbw2
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To: Chickensoup

Listen to this:
http://generationswithvision.com/broadcast/college-out-of-the-box/

Shipping your daughters off to college will soon be an anachronism.


10 posted on 08/02/2012 1:59:22 PM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter knows whom he's working for)
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To: tbw2

Do a search for “girls science camp” and your area. You’ll find everything from Microsoft computer science camp for girls only to local science and tech programs for homeschoolers.


Thank you!


11 posted on 08/02/2012 2:01:17 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: MrB

Shipping your daughters off to college will soon be an anachronism.

Thank you for the link. I am hoping this is the direction the world runs.


12 posted on 08/02/2012 2:02:29 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Chickensoup

I struggle with the same problem with my daughter - she is going into 7th grade as a homeschooler, and she’s extraordinarily bright, loves math and techie things. I was the same way at her age, and I was fortunate that the only thing available was programming in BASIC, because now it’s hard to get kids interested in learning from the ground up. My nephew also had to fight to find computer learning, but he was finally able to take programming classes in high school.

Are you aware of the programming site called “Scratch?” That’s kind if a fun thing to do. I also echo the sentiment about the ham radio - a great idea.

I would suggest keeping with her maturity level and let her have a lot of fun - she’s still young, so let her enjoy the fun of computers for a while.

I would check into your local schools (both public and private) to see if they can do ad hoc techie classes, as well as your Community College, or see what online options are available. She probably ought to get a BA or a BS, but she can work on getting credit online - she can do this quickly, and she doesn’t have to see it as an impediment to growing up and earning money. She needs a goal or she’ll flounder, if she’s not old enough or experienced enough for employment. And just being technical doesn’t necessarily mean that she wants to do it for the rest of her life! The skills might just be an example of her personality type. Maybe she likes solving problems, and the routine of a tech job might be boring.


13 posted on 08/02/2012 2:06:00 PM PDT by agrarianlady
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To: agrarianlady

http://www.collegeplus.org/howitworks/

Boy this looks great!!


14 posted on 08/02/2012 2:15:28 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: agrarianlady
My nephew also had to fight to find computer learning, but he was finally able to take programming classes in high school.

You can download the JDK free from the Oracle website and pick up some basic Java instruction books for self-teaching.

15 posted on 08/02/2012 2:27:46 PM PDT by BlatherNaut
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To: Chickensoup

College might be a very good bet for her. She would learn a great deal of useful information. Engineering schools are anxious to enroll women with her skills and interest, so she should be able to get a scholarship.


16 posted on 08/02/2012 2:30:15 PM PDT by expat2
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To: expat2

I should mention that, without degrees, she may be stuck with lowly tasks — many companies will require degrees to avoid liability suit losses if an “unqualified” person is responsible for a project.


17 posted on 08/02/2012 2:33:40 PM PDT by expat2
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To: expat2

WHooo.....thank goodness, Charles Murray, and not Charles Manson


18 posted on 08/02/2012 2:33:44 PM PDT by job
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To: expat2

College might be a very good bet for her. She would learn a great deal of useful information. Engineering schools are anxious to enroll women with her skills and interest, so she should be able to get a scholarship

__________________

She may be intellectually ready for college in four years but not emotionally ready. Some kids need to hit the ground running and be independent. I need to prepare her for independence. College, if it is in the cards would come later.


19 posted on 08/02/2012 2:36:21 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: expat2

I should mention that, without degrees, she may be stuck with lowly tasks — many companies will require degrees to avoid liability suit losses if an “unqualified” person is responsible for a project.
________________________

I understand, I want to get her out of the box successfully.

God! We need tort reform!


20 posted on 08/02/2012 2:43:48 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Chickensoup

Understood. Best of luck to you and your daughter. :)


21 posted on 08/02/2012 2:45:43 PM PDT by EEGator
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To: Chickensoup

Another thought: The university near us does “Engineering Day” in both March or April and October. They have activities from building water towers out of Popsicle sticks to bottle rockets powered by baking soda to marshmallow and toothpick bridges, along with q&a sessions with engineers, short lessons on different fields of engineering and tours of the college. These activities are free, and both my son and my daughter enjoy them.
And look for local colleges doing math related activities on Pi day, 3/14.


22 posted on 08/02/2012 3:01:18 PM PDT by tbw2
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To: Chickensoup

That’s fine. Most students do better in college if they don’t go to college right from HS.


23 posted on 08/02/2012 3:05:08 PM PDT by expat2
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To: Chickensoup

Many of the bright ppl I have known are those who first learn hands-on, and THEN go to college, while then having the discipline and drive to complete it in four years. It also seems to put them well ahead of the book-only learners in testing and jobs.


24 posted on 08/02/2012 3:08:55 PM PDT by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: Chickensoup

Check out Make magazine. I have no financial interest in them. I just think you might find some kindred spirits there. I think of the magazine as the current version of the Scientific American amateur science column, the old magazines like Radio-TV Experimenter and Science Experimenter, and the Whole Earth Catalog.


25 posted on 08/02/2012 3:20:14 PM PDT by omega4412
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To: Chickensoup

>>>Charles Murray’s book on REAL EDUCATION

I just started reading COMING APART by Murray. Most interesting statistics.

On the high school education front, how about these:

http://www.robinsoncurriculum.com/

He recommends Saxon Math.

And don’t forget to visit his newsletter site with the fairly recent article on model building and science:

http://www.accesstoenergy.com/2012/01/27/model-building-far-more-important-than-memorizing-facts-and-procedures/

Also, there’s Open CourseWare from MIT. Your daughter can order the college texts, read them as she follows the online videos, and then take the tests. All of this is free online. http://ocw.mit.edu/index.htm

And, also there’s Khan Academy: http://www.khanacademy.org/

College Board offers a fair amount of free online materials to pass Advance Placement tests.

Hope this helps.


26 posted on 08/02/2012 3:38:41 PM PDT by Hop A Long Cassidy
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To: Chickensoup

I am going to get “techie” with you - what kind of technology is she interested in? There are any number of areas of industry that get lumped into the category of technology. I’ll give you an example -
Computers
Digital networks
Communications (such as telephony including cell phones)
Radio communications
Satellites
Electrical Engineering
Electronic Engineering
“Green” technology

So, what area of technology interests her? It’s hard to help you put together a homeschool curriculum without knowing that. If you want a GENERAL approach that will help her out, make sure she has plenty of math (Algebra, calculus and trigonometry) and physics. If she nails those things, she can go pretty much anywhere in hardware technology - UNLESS she wants to be a software engineer. If she wants to be a softare engineer, the math is good (but not so much; some calculus and probably no trig), but she will need to be comfortable with the different software applications and the develoment languages currently in use.


27 posted on 08/02/2012 3:53:32 PM PDT by DustyMoment (Congress - another name for white collar criminals!!)
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To: Chickensoup
Chickensoup

This is an area of much discussion in homeschool circles and with homeschool parents. There are two topics here. What to teach her now? What to do about college?

1.) What to teach your daughter now? If you want to design and teach her that is great. You best know her interests and aptitudes and can tailor it to her. For example my son is on a space kick right now. We will be watching the Curiosity landing on Sunday on a NASA feed. We are doing some viewing in advance to get some back ground on Mars.

2.) What about college. Do you go to any homeschool conferences in your area? You may want to start going to some. I went to a big one and talked to some vendors about college and listened to presenter lectures. There is a lot of shared knowledge to be had. Also you can meet and talk to other homeschool parents about what they did and are planning to do. Anyone with kids in their teens is dealing and thinking about the same things you are thinking about.

There is a lot more than I can put in this reply but here are a few things that I came away from the last Homeschool conference that I attended in May. You may want to look at the work of Matthew Bullington and his site at UniversityReady.com and his contributions to the "Well Planned Day" homeschool planners. Matthews approach is that college is not for everyone but if you are going you must have a plan for high school first, college and what to do after college. Here is an article by him The Case for Organization

A few points I learned from Matthew:
- The primary goal for high school is not college but employment and to become an adult.
- High school is an important time and decisions can have long term consequences.
- If you are going to college you need a plan. If you are planning to take two years in community college and then transfer to another college first find out if they will give you credit for the Com College courses and get it in writing from them. Yes.

Look at the work of Ken Auer who mentors young teens into technical careers many without college. He is very hands on and walks the talk of mentoring. ken has developed a software program to customize mentoring.

Ken's site at Role Model Software does not highlight his work bringing about 20 now young adults into their individual high tech careers. I only know about his work from his presentation at a homeschool conference.

Other presenters suggested that taking one or two years out before going to college will help your child in being more prepared and mature. Especially if they do something in that time to show what they have done with the time out. Teachers appreaciate that more than you may expect.

This just brushes the discussion and I have not done it justice. Good luck.

Regards, Mr Sol.

28 posted on 08/02/2012 4:11:32 PM PDT by Solar Wind
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To: DustyMoment

I can see her in comm, although I assume that field is owned by the veterens also networks as well as computers. Thank you for the information.


29 posted on 08/02/2012 4:42:20 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Solar Wind

Thank you for the information, I will look into it. I had one kid go straight to college and frankly I dont think she was well-served by that decision.


30 posted on 08/02/2012 4:46:58 PM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: DustyMoment; The_Reader_David
But not so much math???

Whether she goes into hardware or software or something else, the math is training to think abstractly. Consciousness expansion.

31 posted on 08/02/2012 7:23:14 PM PDT by omega4412
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To: omega4412

There are many paths to thinking abstractly and consciousness expansion. Hippies in the 60s favored LSD for both.

:-)

However, in my experience with software engineers, she would need less math and more philosophy, such as Inductive and Deductive logic. Today, however, the best training a software engineer can get revolves more around knowing specific languages (C++, Java and whatever new technology there is) or platforms that they want to develop in including Linux and its 50 bazillion flavors, Microsoft and whatever Apple is using.


32 posted on 08/02/2012 8:01:23 PM PDT by DustyMoment (Congress - another name for white collar criminals!!)
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To: Chickensoup

You’re not getting rid of me that easily. What area of comm? Networks, computers, radio, satellite? And, I wouldn’t assume that everything is owned by veterans. All areas of communications are expanding (despite a lot of misperceptions) and the need remains great for people who understand the technology.

I have worked in communications for over 40 years, so I have a pretty good understanding of the industry. One particular area of specialization in communications is for RF engineers. The RF field used to be owned by veterans and “old-timers” who learned it in the military. However, after the colleges and universities stopped teaching RF technology and analog technology, it fell to these same veterns and old-timers to pass on their knowledge to the younger engineers, many of whom never spent a day in uniform. The schools thought that these technologies would be replaced by digital everything but, if you want to transmit a signal to the space station, or you just want your cell system to work, you still have to have an RF carrier.

The need for RF engineers is still pretty high and the technology is, essentially, in the “hand-me-down” stage where the old-timers teach RF to the digital whiz-kids who haven’t a clue! If your daughter is interested in doing that and can master the math, she could do quite well.

On the other hand, if she is interested in computer networking, there are two fields that are emerging with high demand. One is for cyber security people who can protect our computer networks and, more importantly, the data that travels over them. A related field is providing security for a lot of the new iPhone/iPad type devices that use a lot of IP networks and Internet infrastructure. Security there is a giant hole and these devices are particularly vulnerable to various nasty viruses, hackers and the like.


33 posted on 08/02/2012 8:19:45 PM PDT by DustyMoment (Congress - another name for white collar criminals!!)
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To: Hop A Long Cassidy

Coursera also.


34 posted on 08/03/2012 2:04:06 PM PDT by Fire_on_High (WTB new tagline, PST!)
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